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23-08-2020, 14:47   #331
xper
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Surprised that the derecho event in the US midwest a couple of weeks ago hasn't gotten a mention:
https://weather.com/news/news/2020-0...damage-impacts
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At a Glance
- Three deaths in Iowa were blamed on the derecho that swept the Midwest.
- An Indiana woman was killed when her mobile home was rolled by high winds.
- The storms caused widespread wind damage as they pushed eastward in the Midwest.
- In Iowa, Illinois and Indiana, more than 1 million homes and businesses lost power.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJ5-ijji3cA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBkPichBlt8
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06-09-2020, 02:05   #332
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California is like a burning inferno with record breaking temperatures this weekend

https://www.latimes.com/california/s...at-is-forecast
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07-09-2020, 22:01   #333
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By way of a contrast!

The American western interior is about to receive a mighty Arctic blast. Could see a 30c fall in 24 hours as it plunges southwards.
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08-09-2020, 00:28   #334
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By way of a contrast!

The American western interior is about to receive a mighty Arctic blast. Could see a 30c fall in 24 hours as it plunges southwards.
33C in Denver today and the airport is forecasting snow in the morning.
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08-09-2020, 00:36   #335
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33C in Denver today and the airport is forecasting snow in the morning.

Bolder 33C today and next two days total snow accumulations of 9 to 15 inches


30-32C in 24 hours difference.
In Ireland probably the greatest difference was 25-26 Dec 2010 which was 25C difference.
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08-09-2020, 06:46   #336
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The American western interior is about to receive a mighty Arctic blast. Could see a 30c fall in 24 hours as it plunges southwards.

Spotted that alright, that must be really weird to experience
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08-09-2020, 11:17   #337
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Spotted that alright, that must be really weird to experience
It actually feels surprisingly uneventful! At least here in continental Europe. In the centre of France, we'd regularly get 25-30°C of difference between day and night in January/February. The record, IIRC, is a swing of 55°C. Last week, we had overnight lows of around 12°C for a daytime max of 30-32°C.
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08-09-2020, 13:15   #338
Charles Babbage
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It actually feels surprisingly uneventful! At least here in continental Europe. In the centre of France, we'd regularly get 25-30°C of difference between day and night in January/February. The record, IIRC, is a swing of 55°C. Last week, we had overnight lows of around 12°C for a daytime max of 30-32°C.

Yes, but +10 to -20 (say) is January is a light coat to a heavy coat type transition, 33C to 2C is a T-shirt and shorts to winter wear transition, in the middle of the day in both cases.
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08-09-2020, 16:56   #339
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It's a shock to the system alright. Where I live, which is near the US-Canada border midway across southern BC, we had 32 degrees C on Sunday, and then the colder air arrived Monday morning, it stalled out around 15 C all day and dropped to near freezing last night. We're going to warm back up into the low 30s by Wednesday, today looks to be around 24 C.

The storm in Colorado has swept the cold, dry air all the way around to Nevada and Utah, now it's moving through northern Arizona. At Las Vegas the front hit at 0700h (today local time) and winds reached NNE 50 mph in gusts. After yesterday's scorching heat, today won't go up much from the morning "low" in the mid 80s F.

The concern is that the strong winds will jump the Sierra Nevada and interact with already massive forest fires in central California and north of LA. It's a bit hard to predict the extent of the strong wind regime in California with the heat trough likely to shift 50-100 miles west. I would imagine most of the central valley will get hit by strong winds ranging from northerlies to easterlies depending on terrain. Around LA they might get alternating Santa Ana and calm periods with the sea breeze front trying to join the party at times. Some very humid air is in place over southern interior California too, dew points into the 23-25 C range being reported. It could lead to some heavy mountain thunderstorms in places.

The strong winds blasting through the Great Basin and eastern WA state yesterday have caused blowing dust problems and accelerated some fires in those states too. Power failures were caused by branches blowing into power lines. We escaped those problems locally as we have no fires in our region this summer. There is a bad situation near Bridgeport, WA (on the Columbia River mid-state) with an evacuation of that small town ordered.

The Colorado snow will probably be a rain-snow mix in some populated areas, certainly trending to all snow around Denver and higher elevations. A secondary low further west near Grand Junction is bringing a chilly rain to eastern Utah and western Colorado lower elevations.

The windy cold front will probably cause havoc later today around Phoenix with blowing dust and perhaps a few storms over higher areas of central Arizona. It won't arrive for a few more hours yet there.
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13-09-2020, 00:08   #340
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A fire tornado in the US.

https://twitter.com/AaronBastani/sta...683999236?s=20
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15-09-2020, 22:46   #341
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I'm sure there were fire tornadoes before the age of carbon even began. Some people don't seem to realize that huge areas of the North American forest used to burn unchecked every year, and accounts of life a century ago include the routine appearance of choking smoke clouds in the late summer and early autumn.

In fact the term "Indian summer" comes from the observation in New England that warm, dry weather in the autumn was often accompanied by smoke which they attributed to the reputed native American practice of burning grasslands to spook bison herds for hunting. The point is that a lot of burning was a normal part of the annual experience, whether their analysis was correct or the smoke was actually from forest fires.

In the Providence weather journal, in the hot dry summer of 1854, Caswell refers to "very smoky with much reduced visibility" several times.

My guess is that these huge fires in 2020 and recent years are part of a cycle and of course it does not help that there are some cases of arson and human carelessness involved, but on the other hand, in past centuries, similar years would have come to their conclusion only when winter rains set in. The native population had no resources to fight fires and were totally at their mercy, having to move hundreds of miles in some cases to get out of harm's way. Our modern lifestyle keeps us more fixed to locations, and those locations are continuing to spread out into the forest boundaries as suburban and exurban living appeals to more and more people. It's great having a few big trees, wide open spaces, and nearby forest in your back yard until a forest fire comes over the ridge, then you are about where the fire can most easily accelerate forward.
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16-09-2020, 07:33   #342
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.T. Cranium
My guess is that these huge fires in 2020 and recent years are part of a cycle and of course it does not help that there are some cases of arson and human carelessness involved, but on the other hand, in past centuries, similar years would have come to their conclusion only when winter rains set in. The native population had no resources to fight fires and were totally at their mercy, having to move hundreds of miles in some cases to get out of harm's way. Our modern lifestyle keeps us more fixed to locations, and those locations are continuing to spread out into the forest boundaries as suburban and exurban living appeals to more and more people. It's great having a few big trees, wide open spaces, and nearby forest in your back yard until a forest fire comes over the ridge, then you are about where the fire can most easily accelerate forward.

Maybe, maybe not, we have no way of truly knowing for sure, but with the rate of deforestation that has occurred on this planet, we may also be accelerating the likelihood of these fires. trees are critical to our exitence, and to all other creatures we share this planet with, it is also understandable why people want to live amongst them, as it's an incredible way to connect with oneself and this planet, rather than man made concrete jungles
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03-10-2020, 12:22   #343
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Catastrophic flooding in the Var region of France (extreme south-east) this weekend. The town of Saint-Martin-Vésubie suffered a record 235mm of rain in just a few hours, but other parts of the region had in equally devasting rainfall, resulting in landslides, destruction of the bridges and roads, houses and commercial premises washed away; ten people missing including two firefighters, one person (gendarme) found alive and well this morning.

https://www.facebook.com/SDISAlpesMa...type=3&theater

https://twitter.com/marinebrenier/st...52359246340101

https://twitter.com/MeteoCotedAzur/s...46277748764673
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03-10-2020, 14:58   #344
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Maybe, maybe not, we have no way of truly knowing for sure, but with the rate of deforestation that has occurred on this planet, we may also be accelerating the likelihood of these fires. trees are critical to our exitence, and to all other creatures we share this planet with, it is also understandable why people want to live amongst them, as it's an incredible way to connect with oneself and this planet, rather than man made concrete jungles
Trees are important as a habitat for a multitude of animals.
But for example the 'lungs of the earth' for the Amazon has been debunked. The Amazon forest has a net contribution of 0%, replacing forest with farms isn't as impactful to the planet as most would think.
Deforestation is alarming none the less but for different reasons, but not critical to human or existence.
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03-10-2020, 20:43   #345
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Catastrophic flooding in the Var region of France (extreme south-east) this weekend.
A "before" and "during" comparison from one of the places affected.


Sadly, there were two elderly people in this house who couldn't be rescued (civil defence were on the scene) before they and the house were washed away.

The river Vésubie rose by 8m in under 24hrs, and the river Var (main river of the département) rose by 5m in the same period. Total rainfall in 24hrs was between 350 and 500mm.
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