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11-01-2019, 09:49   #1
the_syco
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Why are bedrooms furnished in Ireland?

So.... was talking to a Swedish guy, and he was once told (by a previous landlord) the reason that bedrooms in Ireland come as furnished is to prevent some sort of squatters rights, if someone brought their own bedroom furnishings.

Now, this sounds very odd to me. Has anyone heard anything like this? It sounds like some freeman bullshítary, tbh.

I saw this thread, which mentioned that unfurnished had more rights, but was taken out in the 2004 Act, but nothing much apart from that.

Has anyone else heard of this?
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11-01-2019, 09:51   #2
TheChizler
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Squatters rights when you're paying someone for the right to stay there?
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11-01-2019, 10:18   #3
Fol20
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The only reason why properties are furnished is because its the norm in ireland. Ll can advertise as unfurnished as do many other countries howecer since most renters expect it to be furnished. Ll would loose more 90+pc of the potential tenants that would rent it. Its all about trying to market to the largest possible audience and if there is a shift toward unfurnished. I would be delighted. I cant really see this happening though unless legislation comes in enforcing it. Personally, if i didnt need to supply couches, beds washing machines etc, i would be delighted.
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11-01-2019, 10:20   #4
lawred2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_syco View Post
So.... was talking to a Swedish guy, and he was once told (by a previous landlord) the reason that bedrooms in Ireland come as furnished is to prevent some sort of squatters rights, if someone brought their own bedroom furnishings.

Now, this sounds very odd to me. Has anyone heard anything like this? It sounds like some freeman bullshítary, tbh.

I saw this thread, which mentioned that unfurnished had more rights, but was taken out in the 2004 Act, but nothing much apart from that.

Has anyone else heard of this?
No
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11-01-2019, 10:36   #5
Bandana boy
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Once upon a time and I think only in the UK their was different occupation rights based on whether it was furnished or not .
This is no longer the case in either jurisdiction but the practise is still very widespread .
Legally all you have to provide is a Washing machine cooker and microwave .
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11-01-2019, 10:40   #6
the_syco
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TheChizler; this also puzzled me.

=-=

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandana boy View Post
Once upon a time and I think only in the UK their was different occupation rights based on whether it was furnished or not .
This is no longer the case in either jurisdiction but the practise is still very widespread .
Legally all you have to provide is a Washing machine cooker and microwave .
Thanks. As alot of our old laws mirror the UK, I'd say that the issue was similar here. The "that the way it was always done" is a bit of a cop out, tbh.
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12-01-2019, 20:47   #7
1874
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandana boy View Post
Once upon a time and I think only in the UK their was different occupation rights based on whether it was furnished or not .
This is no longer the case in either jurisdiction but the practise is still very widespread .
Legally all you have to provide is a Washing machine cooker and microwave .
you missed fridge, i can't recall if microwave is on the list but as you missed fridge in the first place I'm not sure you're correct about M-wave.
personally I think it's stupid that it's not optional, tenants could buy and be responsible for their own stuff and purchase to whatever quality they want. Including fridges washing machines and cookers. The thing is the anti landlord lot would use it against landlords to malign them when many would be quite happy with that situation, the only condition of have on it is that any appliance is professionally connected, so might rule out a job or cooker for convenience as it's easier to fit/install a washing machine or fridge.
Not in that game anymore but I think many in ireland wouldn't be interested in paying for all the stuff required to fit out a rental, but will happily complain that it's not up to spec.
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12-01-2019, 20:57   #8
nox001
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Because the vast majority of renters see renting as a temporary penance they must go through before buying and have no interest whatsoever in buying furniture, beds etc until they own their own home and so need fully furnished rentals.
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12-01-2019, 20:59   #9
fits
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We would have much preferred to rent unfurnished when we were renting.
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12-01-2019, 21:00   #10
meeeeh
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I suspect renting in Ireland is a lot more short term than in many countries where flats come partly unfurnished.
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12-01-2019, 21:05   #11
Franz Von Peppercorn
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I suspect renting in Ireland is a lot more short term than in many countries where flats come partly unfurnished.
It was more short term. Obviously that has changed.

The countries with unfurnished rentals tend to have better rights for tenants though. It’s obviously going to be hard to give one months notice because your niece wants the property if the tenant has to remove all furniture, fittings and white goods.
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12-01-2019, 22:12   #12
Cash_Q
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We sought to bring a small amount of furniture with us to one flat years ago, and the landlord was wary in case he would have to remove some of the furniture he was providing to be placed into storage. For this reason I can understand why it would be difficult to make it optional as a landlord with multiple furnished properties could be left with lots of furniture to store. The demand for rented accommodation is so high at the moment I'm sure any landlord would have no problem letting an unfinished property if they wished to.
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12-01-2019, 23:26   #13
DrDonkey
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Its actually very difficult to find unfurnished places to rent.

Renting a property unfurnished removes a huge part of the hassle involved for landlords. For many tenants its an advantage, either because they already have furniture and need to put it somewhere, or because they prefer to get their own stuff over time. There should be no loss in rental income for the landlord as these tenants see unfurnished as an advantage.
Also many renting a place unfirnished are looking for long term rentals, so no voids for the landlord either.
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13-01-2019, 08:59   #14
nox001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franz Von Peppercorn View Post
It was more short term. Obviously that has changed.

The countries with unfurnished rentals tend to have better rights for tenants though. It’s obviously going to be hard to give one months notice because your niece wants the property if the tenant has to remove all furniture, fittings and white goods.
I don’t see much change tbh, pretty much every single Irish person or couple I know who doesn’t already own their own place is either saving for it, applying for a mortgage or in the process of buying/building (28 to 35 age group).

Maybe the figure are getting skewed by lots of foreign workers coming here who wouldn’t plan on staying long term so they rent etc but for Irish people buying is still the priority for the majority.
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13-01-2019, 09:04   #15
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Abroad, and I'm generalising here, but in the likes of Germany etc, people find a place to rent with a view to being there for 5, ten, fifteen years. So it makes sense that they bring their own furniture as it's much more "their" home than it would be here.
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