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11-01-2019, 21:58   #16
Beanie5
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That's the thing, she could be for all we know. We've told her we won't be upping our bid so it's theirs if they want to take it at that price. Will be interesting to see what happens next.
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11-01-2019, 22:02   #17
dudara
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Chancing her arm to boost her % commission more like. Hold fast!
The additional income that an EA earns is peanuts, it’s literally not worth the bother.

In the EA’s mind, they had an accepted bidder, happy days. Now the seller has accepted another bid, possibly one outside their remit.
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11-01-2019, 22:58   #18
CollyFlower
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The additional income that an EA earns is peanuts, it’s literally not worth the bother.

In the EA’s mind, they had an accepted bidder, happy days. Now the seller has accepted another bid, possibly one outside their remit.
Estate Agents sometimes have a friend or family member looking to buy, they do stoop.
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11-01-2019, 23:09   #19
dubrov
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Estate Agents sometimes have a friend or family member looking to buy, they do stoop.
I'd say the more common situation where they need to be inventive is when the seller is asking too high and the bidders bidding too low. They need to talk down the seller and talk up the bidder as otherwise there is no commission at all
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12-01-2019, 11:15   #20
depcon
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Could be the seller chancing their arm . Bit strange that the underbidder drove to the house and made the offer to the seller . Maybe the seller is lying to the EA to see if they can extract another 10 k or more out of you.
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12-01-2019, 11:34   #21
bleary
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I had a somewhat similar situation when buying my house. It ended up the bidders couldn't follow through.

A few months later the house turned up again on the market. The ea ended up pushing through my offer with the buyers second time around.

I got the strong impression the ea saw the value of a solid bidder that would complete but the sellers were always hoping for more.

The last thing he ea wants is a flaky buyer or seller. Very poor form on behalf of the seller here
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12-01-2019, 11:58   #22
awec
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Avoid overplaying your hand.

I would just say your current offer still stands. Don’t put a time limit, don’t reduce it

And keep looking elsewhere.
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12-01-2019, 12:01   #23
mr_cochise
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Do not put a time limit on your offer. Leave it as is. There is no ink dry on any contract yet with the other bidder.
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14-01-2019, 09:43   #24
ted1
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The auctioneer could be bullshiing.. if she "sounded confused" sounds like she doesn't know what she's doing,
could be she's chancing her arm and hoping you'll upp your bid. Stick to your guns and don't upp your offer.
Sounds nothing like that, sounds like the seller is making deals with people bypassing the EA.
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14-01-2019, 09:44   #25
ted1
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Estate Agents sometimes have a friend or family member looking to buy, they do stoop.
Any proof to back up your wild claim
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14-01-2019, 10:55   #26
DaraDali
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Hi All,

We were caught in a bidding war over the past few weeks, found out last week that our offer had been accepted and we were delighted. So we've spent the last week getting our letter of offer issued, getting our solicitor in contact with the auctioneer, putting down the deposit etc. Auctioneer emailed us a receipt and told us the house was now off the market and we were sale agreed.

Got a phone call last night to say the underbidder had a change of heart, went and drove to the sellers house and made them an offer of 10k more. So the seller has decided to go with them- even though they're not even mortgage approved yet. We're not in a position to offer anymore at the moment unfortunately, plus the house really isn't worth another 20k.

Is there anything at all we can do in this position? Or is it just take the deposit back and get over it?
Drive to the sellers house yourself and sell your offer that was accepted! Just like with renting a house, sell your offer and the situation you are in! Like another poster said " nothing stopping you going over there "
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