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12-09-2019, 14:46   #16
voluntary
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sheer curtains will sort you out
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12-09-2019, 15:11   #17
TheBoyConor
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sheer curtains will sort you out
Exactly. They can't see in to you but you can peer out at them.
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12-09-2019, 15:16   #18
Spanish Eyes
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Mirror film on the windows is good too, you can see out, no one can see in except at night when a light is on, but you close your curtains and pull down your blinds at night.
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12-09-2019, 15:21   #19
Odyssey 2005
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Wow...!
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12-09-2019, 15:23   #20
kceire
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The house is being built right across from our house on a narrow road they’ll basically be able to look straight into our living room and bedroom and I’m not comfortable with that. Awkward objecting because it’s a neighbours family building it.
Thanks for all the replies
Seriously, do you really think people want to sit there looking into your house for the night?

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It will only be for about a year, we’re renting and will be starting to build a bit further up the road at the start of 2020 all being well. So I think I’ll have to weigh it up. Thanks
Hopefully nobody lodges a petty objection to your Planning Application.
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12-09-2019, 15:25   #21
Addle
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Relax OP.
I think your objection is unreasonable anywasys, but if planning is only going in now, sure they won’t be in the house by the time you intend to move.
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12-09-2019, 15:32   #22
DaveyDave
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Anywhere I've lived the glass is reflective on the outside. You can't see into someone's house as easily as you can see out. Unless it's dark and their lights are on with the curtains open.

The real issue here would be the increase in traffic and parked cars along the road, in my opinion.
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12-09-2019, 15:36   #23
Ray Palmer
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Originally Posted by godtabh View Post
There are minimum separation distances and over looking
At first floor level.
Nope, the ground floor applies too. Do you think Tudor style over hanging first floors are common in Ireland that there is a law to prevent windows in that situation?
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12-09-2019, 16:36   #24
kceire
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Nope, the ground floor applies too. Do you think Tudor style over hanging first floors are common in Ireland that there is a law to prevent windows in that situation?
You may be referring to the 22m rule for opposing windows at first floor level? It’s from this 22m rule that the 11m exempted rule stems from at first floor level.

It’s by no means a hard and fast rule, it is relaxed very regularly in planning applications.

The ground floor is irrelevant as you can go to 1m from the boundary without planning so that’s a non runner with objections.
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12-09-2019, 17:54   #25
Darkglasses
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You don't strictly speaking have to have a reason to make your submission - as long as you pay your €20 and your name is on the submission, it is valid. A one liner of "I object to this development" is accepted onto the file. However, it is probably not going to be successful in having permission refused unless the planner can find a reason within the Planning acts or Local Development Plan etc. to do so.
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12-09-2019, 18:06   #26
skallywag
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I had empathy with the OP until they revealed that they are only renting for a limited time there anyway.

OP, if I was the one building and a short term renter put in such a disagreement then I would frankly be furious. You are being completely unreasonable.
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12-09-2019, 18:15   #27
holliehobbie
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Would the landlord of the house not have to put in the objection?
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12-09-2019, 18:41   #28
Darkglasses
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Would the landlord of the house not have to put in the objection?
No, anyone can object to any Planning Permission application.
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12-09-2019, 18:43   #29
kceire
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Would the landlord of the house not have to put in the objection?
No.
Technically speaking, if the OP gave me the reference number I can object to it using my personal address here in North Dublin.

I had one planning 2 years ago in Cabra, Dublin 7. One observation from a guy who lived on the clonliffe Road, Dublin 3, a couple of miles away!
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12-09-2019, 19:28   #30
riclad
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IF someone builds an extension near you ,they have to put the windows a certain distance from the neighbours on the right and the left.
You are saying they will be able to look into the bedroom and the front room,.
Only if you have no blinds or curtains on the windows .
There was a 4 storey apartment building built behind my gaff,about 35 foot from kitchen .
i presume most of the tenants there could look into my kitchen or bathroom,
i do,nt care because i have curtains on the window,s .
The apartment block was built on the site of an old car garage
so it,s an improvement ,in that its now more quite ,
than it was when the garage was in operation .
i,m not a planning expert ,
I do not think you,d have reasonable grounds for an objection , unless
for instance the building was large enough to block out light,
putting your house in shade .
But you can consult with a planning expert if you are willing to spend money on an objection that might be futile .

i think you could object if someone was planning to build an office
or a retail building in an area zoned for residential use.

i can see no point in objecting to planning permission since you are renting and you intend to move out .
I would find it strange if someone lives in a house in an urban area ,
with no curtains or blinds in the front windows .
If someone is building a house on an empty site or knocking down an old building not in use , that would be considered a positive development
as long as it complys with building regulation,s

Last edited by riclad; 12-09-2019 at 19:32.
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