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10-09-2019, 12:28   #31
nox001
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Originally Posted by Topgear on Dave View Post
I rarely had a bedroom lock and iv been through a few shared houses.

If I couldn't trust the other occupants in a small house then it was time for one of us to leave.
Many people are living with total strangers when in houseshares its totally reasonable to want to lock your door.

I can't ever recall a bedroom door without a lock be it in houseshares or family or friends houses I would call it very abnormal. Even in your own home with family there are times you want to lock the door of your bedroom.

I would see it as highly unreasonable for a LL not to have locks and the reasons given are bordering on tin foil hat stuff.
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10-09-2019, 13:00   #32
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I would see it as highly unreasonable for a LL not to have locks and the reasons given are bordering on tin foil hat stuff.
I would consider it reasonable not to want a key lock from internally in a bedroom.

If a tenant doesn't like that, move on.
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10-09-2019, 13:18   #33
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So not wanting a door locked and requiring a key to open while potentially in a fire is tin foil hat job? Is all fire safety a conspiracy?

There is also the problem of someone taking ill, perhaps an elderly person getting a stoke or heart attack and not being able to be reached because their door is locked, they are incapacitated and the door cannot be opened from outside either. Or a small child turning a key or thumbturn and locking themselves inside unable to be reached.

There are multiple reasons why a homeowner might want to stay clear of locks on internal doors.

You must remember that 99% of houses are intended as family homes. They are not intended as house shares with multiple people living semi-independent lives.
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10-09-2019, 14:01   #34
nox001
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Originally Posted by kceire View Post
I would consider it reasonable not to want a key lock from internally in a bedroom.

If a tenant doesn't like that, move on.
I would consider it unusual and very unreasonable.

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Originally Posted by TheBoyConor View Post
So not wanting a door locked and requiring a key to open while potentially in a fire is tin foil hat job? Is all fire safety a conspiracy?

There is also the problem of someone taking ill, perhaps an elderly person getting a stoke or heart attack and not being able to be reached because their door is locked, they are incapacitated and the door cannot be opened from outside either. Or a small child turning a key or thumbturn and locking themselves inside unable to be reached.

There are multiple reasons why a homeowner might want to stay clear of locks on internal doors.

You must remember that 99% of houses are intended as family homes. They are not intended as house shares with multiple people living semi-independent lives.
But any family house I’ve ever been in has keys on the bedroom door so that’s not a reason. There aren’t often reasons to want to lock your door even at home in a family home.

I’m shocked this is even a topic for conversation having a lockable bedroom door to be is an absolute given, I am very surprised to hear some people don’t have this and even more bizarrely people are finding fault with it.

Last edited by nox001; 10-09-2019 at 15:27. Reason: Lock not kick
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10-09-2019, 14:03   #35
Del2005
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Originally Posted by Claw Hammer View Post
All he needs is a thumb turn on the inside and the ability to lock it from the outside when he is outside. Plenty of euro-profile locks are made that way.
Bedroom doors aren't designed for Euro cylinder locks though. You can only get the locks which can be easily opened.

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Originally Posted by nox001 View Post
I would see it as highly unreasonable for a LL not to have locks and the reasons given are bordering on tin foil hat stuff.
If the property isn't built with internal locks, apartments and new builds, then why should the landlord alter the property. The only way to install a lock would be to remove the door and cut out a new lock profile or drill into the doors/frames.

The other thing is that the property was viewed and accepted without locks so why should the landlord change them afterwards.
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10-09-2019, 14:28   #36
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I am very surprised to hear some people don’t have this and even more bizarrely people are finding fault with it.
I'm sure you would change your tune if someone you know or family member got severely burned or died in a house fire because they couldn't find the key of their locked bedroom door timely enough to get out or dropped it on the dark floor in the panic of the moment.

Of if a toddler locked themselves into a room and choked on something and couldn't be got to in time to save them because of a locked door.

Millenial generation strikes again with this perpetual house sharing.
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10-09-2019, 14:42   #37
Graces7
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I'm sure you would change your tune if someone you know or family member got severely burned or died in a house fire because they couldn't find the key of their locked bedroom door timely enough to get out or dropped it on the dark floor in the panic of the moment.

Of if a toddler locked themselves into a room and choked on something and couldn't be got to in time to save them because of a locked door.

Millenial generation strikes again with this perpetual house sharing.
So logically we cannot then eg lock the door when we are in a shared bathroom or toilet?

Why not also a lock on the outside eg a padlock and short chain or similar, and a simple bolt on the inside ?

When we had bedsits, it was similar and we had locks and keys and never once was there a problem like fire or injury. It was like house sharing is now in that.
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10-09-2019, 14:47   #38
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Bedroom doors aren't designed for Euro cylinder locks though. You can only get the locks which can be easily opened.



.
You can get casings which are the same size as the existing lock with euro profile
keyholes. It is just a matter of enlarging the keyhole.
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10-09-2019, 15:01   #39
TheBoyConor
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So logically we cannot then eg lock the door when we are in a shared bathroom or toilet?

Why not also a lock on the outside eg a padlock and short chain or similar, and a simple bolt on the inside ?

When we had bedsits, it was similar and we had locks and keys and never once was there a problem like fire or injury. It was like house sharing is now in that.

The issue with proper bathroom locks doesn't occur because there is a thumbturn on the inside and s slot on the outside that can be turned with a coin or any flat bladed instrument like a screwdriver or knife. It is easily openable if needed.

That is because there wasn't a fire. When there is a fire, it is an emergency situation. You don't have the luxury of time to try remember which pants the key might be in the arse pocket of, nor do you have time to warm up and stretch before kicking a door down, which is wishful thinking anyway. You shouldn't need to kick a door down.
Bedsits were usually dangerous hovels anyway, good riddance to them.
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10-09-2019, 15:36   #40
nox001
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I'm sure you would change your tune if someone you know or family member got severely burned or died in a house fire because they couldn't find the key of their locked bedroom door timely enough to get out or dropped it on the dark floor in the panic of the moment.

Of if a toddler locked themselves into a room and choked on something and couldn't be got to in time to save them because of a locked door.

Millenial generation strikes again with this perpetual house sharing.
Sure you wouldn’t leave the house for what if’s if you get so worried. You are in far far more danger crossing the road than getting in a house fire.

Also why would you take the key off the inside of the door? I’m fine with thumb locks too but especially for houseshares they need to be lockable from outside.

I’m racking my brain and I can’t really remember a house that you can’t lock the doors, either by key or thumb lock. The vast majority of houses have keys on all room doors. I was in a new build recently alright that had thumb locks on the bedrooms but it still had locks.
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10-09-2019, 15:57   #41
Obvious Desperate Breakfasts
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Originally Posted by kceire View Post
I, as a landlord would not provide locks for bedroom doors.
I believe they are a great fire hazard should they be mistakenly locked at night.
I don’t think I’ve ever mistakenly locked a door in my life. That’s seems like a statistically really unlikely thing to happen. It could happen but so could lots of things. Is accidental door-locking a scourge I’m not aware of?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Topgear on Dave View Post
I rarely had a bedroom lock and iv been through a few shared houses.

If I couldn't trust the other occupants in a small house then it was time for one of us to leave.
Yeah, this is a good point. If I felt I needed to lock my door in a house-share, I wouldn’t have wanted to live there any more.
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10-09-2019, 16:12   #42
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Originally Posted by Graces7 View Post
So logically we cannot then eg lock the door when we are in a shared bathroom or toilet?

Why not also a lock on the outside eg a padlock and short chain or similar, and a simple bolt on the inside ?

When we had bedsits, it was similar and we had locks and keys and never once was there a problem like fire or injury. It was like house sharing is now in that.
Bathrooms are not habitable rooms and typically people do not sleep in them.
Therefore cannot be woken in the dead of the night by a screaming fire alarm and possibly panic trying to escape safely.
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10-09-2019, 16:14   #43
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Originally Posted by Obvious Desperate Breakfasts View Post
I don’t think I’ve ever mistakenly locked a door in my life. That’s seems like a statistically really unlikely thing to happen. It could happen but so could lots of things. Is accidental door-locking a scourge I’m not aware of?



Yeah, this is a good point. If I felt I needed to lock my door in a house-share, I wouldn’t have wanted to live there any more.
Yes. I’ve seen teenagers go to their rooms, lock the door from the inside, pop in head phones or turn on music and not even hear the smoke alarm on the landing.
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10-09-2019, 16:27   #44
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Do you mean there's no locks, or just no keys? I've never lived in a house-share that didn't have locks, though keys were never supplied.
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10-09-2019, 16:51   #45
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Do you mean there's no locks, or just no keys? I've never lived in a house-share that didn't have locks, though keys were never supplied.
The door handles have no locks built in, not even a thumblock
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