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09-09-2019, 16:42   #1
hotshot88
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Bedroom locks in a shared flat

Hi
myself and my flatmate each have our own bedrooms but our bedrooms don't have locks on the doors, has anyone ever experienced this, is it possible to ask the landlord for locks for the bedrooms? its a two bedroom flat, non owner occupied

I'm asking as my flatmate has friends visiting often(as do I) and I would like to avoid a scenario where someone walks into a room that they shouldn't by accident or otherwise. We get on fine and I don't want to cause a scene that might cause a slightly uncomfortable living arrangement.

any info is appreciated.
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09-09-2019, 17:33   #2
kceire
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I, as a landlord would not provide locks for bedroom doors.
I believe they are a great fire hazard should they be mistakenly locked at night.
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09-09-2019, 17:45   #3
beauf
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5 mins googling is that while lots of house (especially older ones) are fitted with internal doors with keys.
It seems to be considered a bad idea to need a key to open any door if its fire escape egress route.
Which suggests even the front and back door shouldn't need a key. Ditto windows.
Its a required standard in some countries.

But then if you have a glass or similar light panel you can just break it and reach and gain access - burglary.
In a shared property you could argue your bedroom is almost like a front door.

Where you do have some internal latch instead of a key seems to be good practice to have a means of opening it from the other side in case a child or someone falls sick on the other side.

Its not like you leave a key beside it either has they can be fished, and or lost.

https://www.fireengineering.com/arti...ocks.html#gref

Last edited by beauf; 09-09-2019 at 19:53.
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09-09-2019, 18:28   #4
Edgware
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I undertand your situation and there is no restriction on people living in private homes locking bedroom doors. In a shared accommodation I can understand why people would want their bedroom locked, particularly when away from the property
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09-09-2019, 18:32   #5
Del2005
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Originally Posted by Edgware View Post
I undertand your situation and there is no restriction on people living in private homes locking bedroom doors. In a shared accommodation I can understand why people would want their bedroom locked, particularly when away from the property
The problem the OP has is that they are in a rented home and it's designed not to have locking internal doors. So to fit locks they'd need to drill the doors and door frames to install locks and no landlord will allow that, not to mention that since they will be on the outside someone could easily lock a person in.
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09-09-2019, 18:35   #6
thenightman
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Originally Posted by kceire View Post
I, as a landlord would not provide locks for bedroom doors.
I believe they are a great fire hazard should they be mistakenly locked at night.

Another of the many reasons why renting is crap in this country. 'Landlords' not being reasonable. If I'm paying out the ass in rent sharing an apartment with a stranger, I don't want him/her to have the ability to access my private room when I'm not home and go through my belongings/valuables.



Do you ban kettles, toasters and washing machines too? surely they are even more of a fire hazard.
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09-09-2019, 19:04   #7
Spanish Eyes
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I am possibly an outlier here, but I would want a means to preserve my privacy. What the heck is wrong with locking your bedroom door when you are going out, or ahem "entertaining", or just using your room yourself?

I understand what people are saying about fire safety and so on, but surely a bedroom door is only plywood (mainly) and could be kicked in if necessary. The bedroom owner keeps the key on him/her at all times.

All the bedroom doors in our house (owned) have locks with a basic key, and although not used, it is very useful to be able to put personal stuff and electronics in the spare room when tradesmen are traipsing around. Not saying that these people would do anything untoward, it is more about keeping personal things private when others are working in the house. Similar to visitors in a shared house I reckon.
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09-09-2019, 20:07   #8
Del2005
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Originally Posted by Spanish Eyes View Post
I am possibly an outlier here, but I would want a means to preserve my privacy. What the heck is wrong with locking your bedroom door when you are going out, or ahem "entertaining", or just using your room yourself?

I understand what people are saying about fire safety and so on, but surely a bedroom door is only plywood (mainly) and could be kicked in if necessary. The bedroom owner keeps the key on him/her at all times.

All the bedroom doors in our house (owned) have locks with a basic key, and although not used, it is very useful to be able to put personal stuff and electronics in the spare room when tradesmen are traipsing around. Not saying that these people would do anything untoward, it is more about keeping personal things private when others are working in the house. Similar to visitors in a shared house I reckon.
In apartments all doors are fire rated and you won't be able to kick them in.

People have died in houses due to locked doors. A little bit of insecurity is better than burning.

I know then locks and how few different key combinations that they have. If someone working in your home wanted to open the door that lock won't stop them. So while you might think that it's safely locked up it's not.
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09-09-2019, 21:12   #9
nox001
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I always locked my door at night when living in shared houses and also when going home at weekends, going away etc. no way would I live in a shared house without a lockable bedroom door.

I wouldn’t be in the least bit worried about a fire, they are so rare anyway to begin with and you can just open the door. Sure our house has a key lock on the front and back doors and we don’t keep keys near either door so I wouldn’t be getting in anyway worried about locking a bedroom door.
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09-09-2019, 21:18   #10
kceire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beauf View Post
5 mins googling is that while lots of house (especially older ones) are fitted with internal doors with keys.
It seems to be considered a bad idea to need a key to open any door if its fire escape egress route.
Which suggests even the front and back door shouldn't need a key. Ditto windows.
Its a required standard in some countries.

But then if you have a glass or similar light panel you can just break it and reach and gain access - burglary.
In a shared property you could argue your bedroom is almost like a front door.

Where you do have some internal latch instead of a key seems to be good practice to have a means of opening it from the other side in case a child or someone falls sick on the other side.

Its not like you leave a key beside it either has they can be fished, and or lost.

https://www.fireengineering.com/arti...ocks.html#gref
Keys on windows and final exits are prohibited here in Ireland too as per our building regulations, specifically TGD Part B (Fire Safety). It’s been like that since the 2006 regs were released and possibly before that.
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09-09-2019, 21:21   #11
kceire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thenightman View Post
Another of the many reasons why renting is crap in this country. 'Landlords' not being reasonable. If I'm paying out the ass in rent sharing an apartment with a stranger, I don't want him/her to have the ability to access my private room when I'm not home and go through my belongings/valuables.



Do you ban kettles, toasters and washing machines too? surely they are even more of a fire hazard.
If you want that amount of privacy then maybe house sharing is not for you.
Machines, kettles and toasters have built in protection but should they catch fire, then the last thing I want is a tenant stumbling around his room at night looking for a key that may or may not be in the door lock and this endangering themselves and affecting the means of escape of that dwelling.

The interlinked smoke detection alarms will alert my tenants and they will be provided with early warning of fire. I’ve also placed detectors in all bedrooms. Call me anal but I believe I’m
Not being unreasonable.

Those are my rules. You don’t like them, move to a house where the LL doesn’t give a sh1t.
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09-09-2019, 22:20   #12
beauf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kceire View Post
Keys on windows and final exits are prohibited here in Ireland too as per our building regulations, specifically TGD Part B (Fire Safety). It’s been like that since the 2006 regs were released and possibly before that.
I don't know if this applies....

Quote:
In general, Building Regulations apply to the construction
of new buildings and to extensions and material
alterations to buildings. In addition, certain parts of the
Regulations apply to existing buildings where a material
change of use takes place. Otherwise, Building
Regulations do not apply to buildings constructed prior to
1 June 1992.
Does this not apply to private homes? What if they are rented out?
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09-09-2019, 22:33   #13
boege
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Some means to lock a bedroom in a houseshare is absolutely normal. Most house shares are a mixed bag and you never know them all well.

It's not about safety, its about security, both your personal security and the security of your property. I have had other people's house guests try enter my room while I was asleep. At any decent house party an open bedroom is an invitation to use (and to check out the contents). Have seen plenty of stuff go missing over the years. If I had company I wanted guaranteed privacy.

By way of an example, friend recently had a south american house share lad go a bit strange (bad drink and drugs mix) and he started trying to break down friend bedroom door. Friend was glad to have it locked.

OP ask the landlord. Alternatively, just change the lock - keep the old one and refit it when leaving. Buy one with a thumb turn cylinder on the inside, if you want to comply with health and safety.
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09-09-2019, 23:13   #14
kceire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beauf View Post
I don't know if this applies....



Does this not apply to private homes? What if they are rented out?
No, you cannot apply the regs retrospectively. I was more replying to the comment that stated it’s a requirement in other countries by confirming it’s a requirement in new builds here too.
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10-09-2019, 01:15   #15
Bandana boy
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If fire regs are the issue then a thumb lock should do the trick .
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