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18-08-2019, 14:01   #61
Quandary
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I started to get others opinions. It’s easy to overlook signs or look to read too much into something.
We were sale agreed for 9 months before finally pulling out because the seller was evasive and awkward at almost every turn. We absolutely loved the house and were devastated to have to walk away but in hindsight we should have walked much sooner. The straw(s) that broke the camels back for us was the seller refusing to provide essential planning related documentation and there were question marks over a right of way issue which the seller also refused to clarify.

It turned out to be a great decision because we ended up in a house we love just as much!

If I was you I would start actively viewing other properties, and let the seller know ye will be withdrawing from the sale unless he is willing to facilitate yer requests.

Don't let your heart make a decision you know you should be making with your head.

Best of luck
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18-08-2019, 14:16   #62
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Is it not normal for engineers to point out the limitations of their visual inspection? Has your engineer actually described this to you as something really important. Any engineer I've used has always pointed out what they couldn't determine to be alright but I could tell it was boilerplate arse covering.

If your solicitor is also good at finding potential issues, then it may be just a case of you sending the wrong signals to the buyer.

Buying a house is a big deal and mentally stressful. It's normal to be a bit paranoid. At the end of the day you have to make a judgement call on which issues really matter.

I once lost out on a good property because I queried the land registry documents for the property. What was described as 5 acres turned out to be 3.5 acres. I was eventually proven to be correct but I still lost out on the purchase.
He can not determine as he cannot access it and has recommended cctv exploration. We have a company lined up.
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18-08-2019, 14:28   #63
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Originally Posted by Quandary View Post
We were sale agreed for 9 months before finally pulling out because the seller was evasive and awkward at almost every turn. We absolutely loved the house and were devastated to have to walk away but in hindsight we should have walked much sooner. The straw(s) that broke the camels back for us was the seller refusing to provide essential planning related documentation and there were question marks over a right of way issue which the seller also refused to clarify.

It turned out to be a great decision because we ended up in a house we love just as much!

If I was you I would start actively viewing other properties, and let the seller know ye will be withdrawing from the sale unless he is willing to facilitate yer requests.

Don't let your heart make a decision you know you should be making with your head.

Best of luck
Given the sheer pressure we have been put under in the last couple of weeks to sign contracts, the sudden cancellation of our plumber and now saying no one else can gain access, if we do now get access, I cannot shake the doubts I now have.

There is no good reason to deny access especially since they cancelled on us initially.

It all went pear shaped once we told them we need to check the concern regarding the pipes.
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18-08-2019, 14:40   #64
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Given the sheer pressure we have been put under in the last couple of weeks to sign contracts, the sudden cancellation of our plumber and now saying no one else can gain access, if we do now get access, I cannot shake the doubts I now have.

There is no good reason to deny access especially since they cancelled on us initially.

It all went pear shaped once we told them we need to check the concern regarding the pipes.
So pull the plug and withdraw your offer. Don't waste any more time or money on this property.
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18-08-2019, 15:59   #65
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He can not determine as he cannot access it and has recommended cctv exploration. We have a company lined up.
My engineer said the same about the septic tank. He also said that I could ask him to do a more invasive inspection (rather than purely visual) of the house but that would need the seller's permission. He didn't say either thing with any conviction or emphasis.


Anyway best of luck with your purchase. Things sometimes work out well.
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18-08-2019, 16:19   #66
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The engineer could not access the manhole out the back. They have raised the level of part of the back by half a meter. There is a cover at new garden level which opens and exposes the original manhole. That has been essentially wedged shut by the the resining of the garden. He said you’d nearly need to smash the cover to access it. He recommended a specially with CCTV to check it.
Doesn't sound like something that can be easily approached or assessed- sounds like you either take a risk on it or move on to a new property- but the fact that the vendors aren't allowing you do anything does sound like there's a specific issue there.
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18-08-2019, 16:49   #67
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I’m not saying the vendors are hiding or not hiding anything here but it would be extremely rare to allow plumbers and electricians into a Propety you are buying.

The norm would be your Surveyor for the visual pre purchase survey. Anything beyond that is out of the norm.
Thanks for the reply. Apologies if I’m missing something but how is an engineer going to know if the electrics are needing replacing or the plumbing/heating is up to standard.

Why are so many other people here calling it out as a red flag?

Have we done things in a terrible order or something?
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18-08-2019, 17:08   #68
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Three weeks isn’t a long time when it comes to house contracts.
Quite quick really, especially considering August is holiday month for many solicitors (and those in building trades).
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18-08-2019, 17:51   #69
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Thanks for the reply. Apologies if I’m missing something but how is an engineer going to know if the electrics are needing replacing or the plumbing/heating is up to standard.

Why are so many other people here calling it out as a red flag?

Have we done things in a terrible order or something?
No you haven't.

Here's what you could do. Ask your solicitor to talk to their solicitor- outline the concerns. Tell them that if there's no issue found, you're good to complete the sale. Even if there is something found, or if the vendors are willing to state any known issue, you still might go through with the sale- but right now, you can't progress until this issue is cleared up.

Now that, is reasonable- and if they refuse, then I'd get out quickly and get on with starting your search again.
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18-08-2019, 21:35   #70
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Very interesting thread, I would think in most cases perspective purchasers go for Surveyor to look at the place.
My understanding Surveyors will do so much examination, but can't see certain things such as pipes underneath, so in addition to surveyors, who else should a buyer get in before proceeding?
-Electrician?
-Who else?
In terms of gardens, are there any unforeseen issues?
If you want to be 110%, who else would you get in to check a house.
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18-08-2019, 21:52   #71
Dav010
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Very interesting thread, I would think in most cases perspective purchasers go for Surveyor to look at the place.
My understanding Surveyors will do so much examination, but can't see certain things such as pipes underneath, so in addition to surveyors, who else should a buyer get in before proceeding?
-Electrician?
-Who else?
In terms of gardens, are there any unforeseen issues?
If you want to be 110%, who else would you get in to check a house.
You can get in whomever you want, of course you will have to pay them, and unlike a surveyor they do not have to stand over the opinions they give you.
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18-08-2019, 23:40   #72
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Thanks for the reply. Apologies if I’m missing something but how is an engineer going to know if the electrics are needing replacing or the plumbing/heating is up to standard.

Why are so many other people here calling it out as a red flag?

Have we done things in a terrible order or something?
It’s not the engineers job to do that.
Or surveyors for that matter. You are buying a property from a particular period. The standard of the build is to that period. If you don’t like that, you don’t buy. The house doesn’t have to be up to any greater standard than the standards in place at the time of construction.

Are purchase survey is to highlight any possible issues, areas to which you can upgrade in the future or areas of concern at the moment.

If I point out cracking in a table wall, I recommend an engineers inspection and tell tail placement to monitor the cracks, but that takes a period of 2-3 months to rule out the risk of structural cracking or seasonal cracking.

If the vendors don’t allow that then you as the purchaser have to make the decision whether to buy or not.

Same goes for the plumbing. If it’s a 90’s built house, then you expect 90’s plumbing. If it requires updating, you factor that into your offer and decide to buy or not.
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18-08-2019, 23:43   #73
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Very interesting thread, I would think in most cases perspective purchasers go for Surveyor to look at the place.
My understanding Surveyors will do so much examination, but can't see certain things such as pipes underneath, so in addition to surveyors, who else should a buyer get in before proceeding?
-Electrician?
-Who else?
In terms of gardens, are there any unforeseen issues?
If you want to be 110%, who else would you get in to check a house.
Surveyor for initial pre purchase survey and to pick up on any planning requests.
Engineer for structural inspection (visual only, no invasive inspection).
Plumber for plumbing.
Electrician for electrics.

Of course, you’d have to get the vendors permission for all these and you’d have to pay all these guys for their time spent there on the day and the time spent putting together some form of written reply. Could cost €2k. Not bad if you only do it once!
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19-08-2019, 08:29   #74
FutureGuy
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Surveyor for initial pre purchase survey and to pick up on any planning requests.
Engineer for structural inspection (visual only, no invasive inspection).
Plumber for plumbing.
Electrician for electrics.

Of course, you’d have to get the vendors permission for all these and you’d have to pay all these guys for their time spent there on the day and the time spent putting together some form of written reply. Could cost €2k. Not bad if you only do it once!
And that’s what we are attempting to do and we are being blocked by the vendor.
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19-08-2019, 09:10   #75
Dav010
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And that’s what we are attempting to do and we are being blocked by the vendor.
How long has it been since bid accepted and deposit paid?

Like others, I agree it is odd for the seller not to allow your tradesmen in, particularly if it would expedite the sale, On the other hand they may feel you delayed by not getting it done before this, what legal papers did the engineer need before doing the survey? If you haven’t signed any contracts, both parties can walk away and apart from your professional fees, you aren’t out of pocket.
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