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04-01-2019, 12:06   #61
Ada Victorious Lip
 
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What I’m arguing though is that we might be close to a situation whereby not doing is would be the end of the EU as we know it as well (with the European Parliament having a majority of euro sceptic MEPs, and national governments in large countries willing to change the status quo a lot more). At some point I believe it could very possibly come to choosing between the lesser evil and even our governement might decide that it is a better move to compromise on taxation matters rather that risking to break a free trade zone which is key to our economy.
It is definitely going to be an issue, and obviously this one will affect property prices in some way if it happens. We may have drifted off topic though here!
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04-01-2019, 20:07   #62
Pussyhands
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Congratulations on the deposit that's good saving. But if you're made unemployed you won't be getting a mortgage.
Even in a once in a generation recession 84 out of every 100 people were still employed.

My job is pretty ok I think, even if I'm let go I'll get redundancy.
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04-01-2019, 21:04   #63
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I'm hoping for another recession, tbh.

Bought during the last recession for cash, sold April 2018 (you can guess, I came out winning, also no CGT because of PPR).

Currently have 80% deposit for what i'd consider 'perfect home' budget. A recession that would bring prices down a few % and boom, I can buy my ideal home with cash.

C'mon ta fcuk.... I don't want to be waiting around any longer.
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04-01-2019, 21:24   #64
InstaSte
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I'm hoping for another recession, tbh.

Bought during the last recession for cash, sold April 2018 (you can guess, I came out winning, also no CGT because of PPR).

Currently have 80% deposit for what i'd consider 'perfect home' budget. A recession that would bring prices down a few % and boom, I can buy my ideal home with cash.

C'mon ta fcuk.... I don't want to be waiting around any longer.
How much are ya paying on rent in the meantime ?
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04-01-2019, 22:34   #65
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How much are ya paying on rent in the meantime ?
0
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04-01-2019, 23:24   #66
Ada Victorious Lip
 
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I'm hoping for another recession, tbh.

Bought during the last recession for cash, sold April 2018 (you can guess, I came out winning, also no CGT because of PPR).

Currently have 80% deposit for what i'd consider 'perfect home' budget. A recession that would bring prices down a few % and boom, I can buy my ideal home with cash.

C'mon ta fcuk.... I don't want to be waiting around any longer.
Good lad. Did you come in to boast or discuss the title?
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05-01-2019, 10:45   #67
UpTheSlashers
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I'm hoping for another recession, tbh.

Bought during the last recession for cash, sold April 2018 (you can guess, I came out winning, also no CGT because of PPR).

Currently have 80% deposit for what i'd consider 'perfect home' budget. A recession that would bring prices down a few % and boom, I can buy my ideal home with cash.

C'mon ta fcuk.... I don't want to be waiting around any longer.
Classy.
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05-01-2019, 10:50   #68
kippy
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Originally Posted by JohnCleary View Post
I'm hoping for another recession, tbh.

Bought during the last recession for cash, sold April 2018 (you can guess, I came out winning, also no CGT because of PPR).

Currently have 80% deposit for what i'd consider 'perfect home' budget. A recession that would bring prices down a few % and boom, I can buy my ideal home with cash.

C'mon ta fcuk.... I don't want to be waiting around any longer.
There are plenty like you as well. More power to ye.
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05-01-2019, 11:00   #69
stateofflux
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If their wages are cut significantly imagine how the wages in the rest of the country will be effected.
Rest of Country won't be affected.

Salary increases of min 10% are overdue from fallout of last recession. FDI related salaries are somewhat outside this.
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05-01-2019, 11:21   #70
Bob24
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Rest of Country won't be affected.

Salary increases of min 10% are overdue from fallout of last recession. FDI related salaries are somewhat outside this.
When there is a skill overlap, multinational salaries cannot possibly be completely disconnected from the rest of the job market.

For exemple even though they work for an Irish organisation, a software developer working for Dublin Bus or an accountant working for Eir do benefit from multinationals drying up the job market and paying better salaries. Their employers won’t match Google levels but they are pressured to pay more than they otherwise would if better paid jobs didn’t exist in multinationals.
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05-01-2019, 12:08   #71
stateofflux
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When there is a skill overlap, multinational salaries cannot possibly be completely disconnected from the rest of the job market.

For exemple even though they work for an Irish organisation, a software developer working for Dublin Bus or an accountant working for Eir do benefit from multinationals drying up the job market and paying better salaries. Their employers won’t match Google levels but they are pressured to pay more than they otherwise would if better paid jobs didn’t exist in multinationals.
Id nearly guarantee you there will be no salary cuts in the public service in the next 5 years unless something worst case scenario happens.

Current private sector salaries have to go up also they are way under where they should be. There is a salary gap between Multinational and national wages which will close also...unless something major happens
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05-01-2019, 12:13   #72
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Id nearly guarantee you there will be no salary cuts in the public service in the next 5 years unless something worst case scenario happens.

Current private sector salaries have to go up also they are way under where they should be. There is a salary gap between Multinational and national wages which will close also...unless something major happens
Public sector wages are always the last hard choice made by government all political parties vigorously Court the public sector vote and the media are overtly pro public sector, unions are never off rte
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05-01-2019, 13:15   #73
Bob24
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Id nearly guarantee you there will be no salary cuts in the public service in the next 5 years unless something worst case scenario happens.

Current private sector salaries have to go up also they are way under where they should be. There is a salary gap between Multinational and national wages which will close also...unless something major happens
Public service is a separate beast and isn’t the majority of “the rest of the country” as opposed to multinationals. But for specific skills even public service salaries are influenced be multinationals (being in IT myself and having interviewed with a public organisation, they seem to be having a very hard time to hire without pushing up salary scales significantly in certain professions). Even leaving salary cuts asside, if that job market pressure didn’t exist they would hire with lower wages which would in turn lower their average wages for those professions thanks to cheaper new hires (again I am talking about qualified professionals only).

An in terms of private sector, I don’t think salaries “have to go up” no matter what. Employers are no charities and simply react to market conditions so if pressure was to ease-up on the job market for certain professions such as the ones I mentioned, why would they increase wages no matter what?

Last edited by Bob24; 05-01-2019 at 13:29.
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05-01-2019, 14:34   #74
The_Conductor
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When there is a skill overlap, multinational salaries cannot possibly be completely disconnected from the rest of the job market.

For exemple even though they work for an Irish organisation, a software developer working for Dublin Bus or an accountant working for Eir do benefit from multinationals drying up the job market and paying better salaries. Their employers won’t match Google levels but they are pressured to pay more than they otherwise would if better paid jobs didn’t exist in multinationals.
Not necessarily. Up to around 2006 there was a specific public sector allowance paid to IT post holders- even today it hasn't been restored. E.g. in the civil service there were admin EOs and EO ICT or Junior Systems Analysts. The EO JSA got the EO salary- plus an allowance worth about 8% of the gross salary- for holding an ICT post (note- they had to be appropriately qualified etc- its not that anyone could walk into such a post).

Allowances or special pay rates for ICT, HR, Accountancy and other functions- were never brought back in the public sector (which is why they are finding it impossible to recruit into these roles- they simply can't compete).
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05-01-2019, 15:36   #75
stateofflux
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Public service is a separate beast and isn’t the majority of “the rest of the country” as opposed to multinationals. But for specific skills even public service salaries are influenced be multinationals (being in IT myself and having interviewed with a public organisation, they seem to be having a very hard time to hire without pushing up salary scales significantly in certain professions). Even leaving salary cuts asside, if that job market pressure didn’t exist they would hire with lower wages which would in turn lower their average wages for those professions thanks to cheaper new hires (again I am talking about qualified professionals only).

An in terms of private sector, I don’t think salaries “have to go up” no matter what. Employers are no charities and simply react to market conditions so if pressure was to ease-up on the job market for certain professions such as the ones I mentioned, why would they increase wages no matter what?
A separate beast to a point but linked in the bigger scheme. Salaries have stayed the same for the last few years but cost of living / inflation has increased.. growing economies need salaries that are relatively proportional to cost of living otherwise you have problems.

the salary issue is contributing to the housing problem also.
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