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21-10-2019, 19:07   #16
Force Carrier
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Some pilots go the whole way in third gear.
Awful waste of juice.
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21-10-2019, 19:12   #17
sdanseo
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The most common aircraft flying from Ireland to the UK (737-800, A320-200) will use around 3 to 5 tons of fuel for approximately 180 seats. Dublin to London for this example.

If full, that's around 27 litres of Jet A1 each. Since jet fuel is hedged by airlines in extremely large quantities it's very comparable to the amount of fuel burnt by an individual driving the same distance but at about half the fuel cost.
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21-10-2019, 19:12   #18
GhostyMcGhost
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Some pilots go the whole way in third gear.
Awful waste of juice.
They balance it by switching off the engine for landing
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21-10-2019, 19:21   #19
Jonybgud
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They balance it by switching off the engine for landing
Yeah you just need the engines to get up there, gravity brings you down. Luckily there isn't many thorns up there punctures are rare enough...
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21-10-2019, 19:44   #20
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Think Ryanair said recently it's was the most eco-friendly airline.
Perhaps so, if i's using newer fleets of craft, and if the metals/plastics used to create them, were smelted by fairy magick and wizard wands.

Ideally getting rid of 1st class altogether would be the best (more space/passenger load).
The eco-warriors who often like to fly premium, can just settle for cattle class like most regular people.
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21-10-2019, 19:48   #21
magicbastarder
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There are a lot of variables involved with this. Weight, weather, aircraft type etc... but lets say you are flying with Ryanair (FR), DUB-LGW. Block time is about 1hr.

If its Ryanair then you'll be on a 737-800 which burns approx 4.88 gallons per seat per hour (with ave capacity this is around 750 gallons per hour).
i assume that includes takeoff and climb? i did note a few years ago when going to bristol that aer lingus/stobart seemed to exclusively use turboprops getting there, but ryanair fly 737s. i wouldn't be surprised if the 737 never even reaches its cruising altitude on that short hop?
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21-10-2019, 19:52   #22
antodeco
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Surely they'd use less on the way back as it's downhill?
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22-10-2019, 05:44   #23
Captain_Crash
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i assume that includes takeoff and climb? i did note a few years ago when going to bristol that aer lingus/stobart seemed to exclusively use turboprops getting there, but ryanair fly 737s. i wouldn't be surprised if the 737 never even reaches its cruising altitude on that short hop?

Nah I just was as basic as possible. TO and Climb would mean a change or two in the figures I gave, but also there is descent which balances out the hour (as you wouldn't be in cruise for very long)


For any short flight to BRS, LPL MAN etc, the crew will do the maths and find the most efficient altitude to climb to (or start descending from should they never level off). On a flight to BRS they would reach a cruise level but it'll be quite low, maybe 25 or 26 thousand feet. And yes Stobart and the ATR's a so much more efficient on those routes.
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22-10-2019, 07:37   #24
blergh
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113kg of CO2 emissions per passenger on a flight from Dublin to Heathrow according to the calculator on this page:
How your flight emits as much CO2 as many people do in a year

https://www.theguardian.com/environm...y_to_clipboard

It takes into account the different sized aircraft used in different routes.

Emissions by planes at an altitude are in fact more damaging than emissions at ground level.
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22-10-2019, 19:34   #25
Capt'n Midnight
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Think Ryanair said recently it's was the most eco-friendly airline.
Perhaps so, if i's using newer fleets of craft, and if the metals/plastics used to create them, were smelted by fairy magick and wizard wands.

Ideally getting rid of 1st class altogether would be the best (more space/passenger load).
The eco-warriors who often like to fly premium, can just settle for cattle class like most regular people.
An empty 737 weighs about 40 tons so if its burning 5 tons a flight it's nearly going through it's own weigh in fuel every day doing London - Dublin

Very rough rule of thumb it takes 2kg of oil to make 1kg of plastic.

Unlike the average car that spends most of it's life parked commercial aircraft are worked hard.
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23-10-2019, 13:26   #26
sdanseo
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An empty 737 weighs about 40 tons so if its burning 5 tons a flight it's nearly going through it's own weigh in fuel every day doing London - Dublin

Very rough rule of thumb it takes 2kg of oil to make 1kg of plastic.

Unlike the average car that spends most of it's life parked commercial aircraft are worked hard.
True figure there is about half that. 4 tons an hour is a handy average as is a figure of six sectors a day for short haul.

6x4 = 24 tons and proportionately less if used for longer flights, burn will be about 2-2.5 tons per hour in the cruise.

In the same amount of time it will have carried almost 1,000 people who if they all drove their cars 500km would have used 25,000L or 20+ tons of petrol/diesel. Everything is relative.
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