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16-09-2020, 10:37   #16
whisky_galore
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Found those countries and their cities easy, cheap and very safe to get around. Most places were neat, litter free and well looked after.

Unlike here no nackery kids throwing fireworks, burnt out cars or benefits underclass perpetually making trouble. They can do apartment living without going down the Ballymun dystopia road.
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16-09-2020, 10:41   #17
denartha
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The pay in Ireland is higher. An Eastern European friend said to me once that their job back home only covered their living expenses. In Ireland a job can cover your living expenses plus a bit more. Trying to quantify the bit more part is hard as it depends on your job/pay. I'd imagine moving from a lower cost economy in Eastern Europe to Ireland would be a bit of a shock financially speaking due to the cost of living here. As the economies of Eastern Europe continue to develop Ireland will probably lose some of its appeal. I've been to much of Eastern Europe and liked it for the most part. Slovenia was probably my favourite.
I worked with a Polish guy back in 2005. He was earning same as me so about 20k a year and was sending money home to his mother. She was concerned he wasn't eating enough because he could send over so much money to her.

I moved to the Czech Republic in 2009. Lifestyle was great. Went out in the evening 3-4 times a week. While the wages compared to here are so much lower, life in general is a lot cheaper. I met a french couple while over there who had been living in Dublin until the downturn in 2008/2009. Their experience of both places was similar to my own, in that in Ireland you went out once a week at most but if your ipod/laptop/phone needed replacing you went out and replaced it. In Czechia you could afford to go out 3-4 times a week but if something expensive needed replacing, you had to save up for it, probably over a few months.

Over there, my budget for a friday night sesh was about 20 euros. 5 or 6 pints, dinner, see a stripper, have a few games of pool and a taxi home.

The 10% deposit I need to save in Ireland would buy me a home in full in some parts of Czechia, Slovakia, Poland etc.

So to answer the OP, living a frugal life in Ireland you can save up a meaningful amount of money that will set you up in Eastern Europe. That's why people want to come here.
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16-09-2020, 10:43   #18
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I found Poland great. Can I ask where you went and what you disliked?
Krakow. Couldn't get any info from staff at museums, couldn't get served at restaurants and the only person I encountered who was remotely civil was the woman shilling for a stripclub.

Last edited by ancapailldorcha; 16-09-2020 at 10:48.
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16-09-2020, 10:44   #19
denartha
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I taught English in Brno in the Czech Republic back in 2011/2012.

It's a decent-sized city. There's a good amount of IT companies there and there's a good bit of industry. It's not a poor place at all. It's not Prague either, though, where things are more expensive and more exciting. I earned about €600 a month and I never had to worry about not having enough. About half of that went on rent (which many told me was expensive for where I was). It was a comfortable enough life but any time I came home, I noticed the difference. A pint there could be had for €1.20 which doesn't compare to paying between €4 and €5 at the time.

Saving a decent amount of money was the big problem. Whatever you could save didn't go very far as soon as you left. The Czech Republic is one of the more stable Eastern Europe countries. Public transport is pretty good and accomodation in that there is a lot of both, though it is dated. The problem is the money that can be earned for the majority, not that those opportunities don't exist.
I'm pretty sure I met you in the Immigrant in Brno in 2012.
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16-09-2020, 10:51   #20
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I was in Gdansk and Sopot and basically had the opposite experience. People were nice. Maybe more of a big city attitude in Krakow?
I tend to stick to cities and this is the only Eastern European one I couldn't find anything nice to say about it. I had a much better time in any other country I've been to.
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16-09-2020, 10:53   #21
denartha
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I tend to stick to cities and this is the only Eastern European one I couldn't find anything nice to say about it. I had a much better time in any other country I've been to.
My experience of Krakow was the opposite of yours. Had a really great time there.
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16-09-2020, 10:58   #22
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I have been to a few places in Eastern Europe if your definition of Eastern Europe stretches to places that were formerly part of Yugoslavia.
I've been to Lithuania, Poland, Hungary, Croatia, Bosnia, Herzegovina, and Montenegro.

They're all great places to visit, particularity enjoyed Montenegro and Lithuania. Bosnia and Herzegovina were a very underdeveloped however.

I wouldn't live in any of them though, there is an obvious difference in development in all of the countries I visited compared to Ireland that became more apparent once you left the cities and visited more rural areas.
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16-09-2020, 10:58   #23
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From working abroad and renting to a lot of eastern europeans the two things that attract them

More money for returning to home. They save 10% of their Irish money and after a few years, they have a sizable deposit for a house back home or they send money home and it's going a lot lot further.

Life experience. Young and exploring the world, practising English in a business environment will improve their careers.


I personally have never understood the dread about leaving home. Millions do it every year and never look back. Others return home but with great memories.
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16-09-2020, 10:59   #24
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A couple years working here in minimum wage jobs will let you build a house back home in Eastern Europe, we tend to get alot of the under-educated working class Eastern Europeans who come here to do the hard graft, wheras a Solicitor in Poland isn't going to be coming here to wash cars or do housekeeping in hotels etc. Its the typical story of immigration everywhere, work abroad, save money for your future and to provide for parents and family.
Yeap. Dated a Hungarian girl years ago who worked here in a beauty salon for 5 years and saved up enough to buy outright a brand new house in Hungary.

I find eastern european people in general to be fantastic and love their work ethic (much like the Irish in that regard) and have high family values. They are mostly also deeply proud nationalists which is to be greatly admired.
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16-09-2020, 11:00   #25
XsApollo
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Edit : scratch that.
Too lazy
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16-09-2020, 11:01   #26
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I have been living in 'eastern' Europe for the best part of 10 years, across 3 countries. It's grand. Bureaucracy can be a nightmare, a lot of government institutions are very old fashioned and painful to do business with, but in general the people are friendly and helpful, if a little stand offish at first. Salaries are much lower than home but cost of living also is much cheaper. I managed to buy a house here which I could never have done at home.

In general, don't believe everything you see or hear about the iron curtain, the countries are developing rapidly with much more western influence. Before coming here, my expectation was dreary Communist era apartments and damp and snow, and while there is plenty of old Communist architecture around, it is modernising fast.

Weather is also great, with warm summers and snowy winters, beautiful countryside, and as for the women...
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16-09-2020, 11:01   #27
breezy1985
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Yeap. Dated a Hungarian girl years ago who worked here in a beauty salon for 5 years and saved up enough to buy outright a brand new house in Hungary.

I find eastern european people in general to be fantastic and love their work ethic (much like the Irish in that regard) and have high family values. They are mostly also deeply proud nationalists which is to be greatly admired.
I wouldn't be too fond of some of the nationalists knocking around Poland and Hungary at the moment
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16-09-2020, 11:02   #28
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I was in Gdansk and Sopot and basically had the opposite experience. People were nice. Maybe more of a big city attitude in Krakow?
Krakow is probably the Polish city most visited by foreigners and like many places where tourism has become one of the main money spinners tourists are often just about tolerated.
I liked Krakow but not the people, the city has a wealth of history and considers itself Poland's cultural capital so maybe they have a bit of a superiority complex. Warsaw ranks pretty much bottom of the list of cities I would like to revisit.
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16-09-2020, 11:04   #29
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Personally, I found Poland a lovely country and the Poles a warm and friendly, helpful people - much friendlier than the Czechs and Slovaks, IMO. Russians were as cold as ice, I found.

I made a few Polish friends from the time they worked with me in the early 2000s in Dublin and even though they've long since returned to Poland (one of my friends from Krakow saved furiously in Dublin and bought a large apartment in Krakow for cash - yes indeed!) we are still in touch and I've been over and stayed with two of them. The warmth and hospitality I was shown over there was wonderful.

The young women in Prague were stunning on the two occasions I visited there in 1999 and 2004. Real head turners - model-esque in their beauty. The Czech guys are so-so in their looks - they are often handsome and fit in thier 20s but many seem to let themselves go as they get older. Maybe that's because in Czechia and some other neighbouring countries - women outnumber men significantly - a legacy of World War 2 and the Iron Curtain, I believe.

Last edited by JupiterKid; 16-09-2020 at 11:10.
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16-09-2020, 11:04   #30
denartha
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Weather is also great, with warm summers and snowy winters, beautiful countryside, and as for the women...
Thats something I miss. Proper discernible seasons.
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