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09-01-2019, 20:27   #61
ULMarc
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I'd say if you stick with hand signals you'll do fine. It's a natural motion, it's familiar to other road users, and it's cheap.

I find that the more you can reduce extra equipment on your commute the more pleasant your experience will be. Just sticking with basic gear in winter can already be a chore, never mind additional items that need batteries.

Having said that, if you do happen to be buying a pair a gloves then a bright colour, or a pair with reflective elements, would be a benefit. A high vis windbreaker will also make both you and your arm positions more visible.

And enjoy it, Limerick's not a bad spot for the old cycle commuting.
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09-01-2019, 20:59   #62
Squall Leonhart
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And enjoy it, Limerick's not a bad spot for the old cycle commuting.
So far so good, would definitely echo this, no incidents so far, feel safe as well. I've just avoided dangerous spots.

Part of my cycle is the Dock Road, out of town as far as the cement factory roundabout, and up towards South Court Hotel, this is fine in this direction, but I go an alternative route home rather than try that roundabout. You'd want a heavy boot in a car some evenings!
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09-01-2019, 23:55   #63
bilbot79
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As dangerous as driving with one hand on the steering wheel and the other holding coffee/changing gears/texting/changing radio/etc ?
Changing gears is fine there. Texting is terrible.

When someone is cycling their concentration is spent on maintaining balance while levels of movement all over are changing constantly. The centre of balance is moving round all the time and some people have better balance than others. For these reasons, using one hand in a car or even a motorbike doesn't even compare with doing it on a bike. Although i wouldnt recommend it in any vehicle.
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09-01-2019, 23:57   #64
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A small mirror would be handy, see what's coming up behind
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10-01-2019, 00:20   #65
YFlyer
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You've to take one off the bars and steer and keep youself stable with just one arm while signalling. If you hit a bump or your other hand slips you will fall.
All can be done without any arms.
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10-01-2019, 00:24   #66
YFlyer
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So far so good, would definitely echo this, no incidents so far, feel safe as well. I've just avoided dangerous spots.

Part of my cycle is the Dock Road, out of town as far as the cement factory roundabout, and up towards South Court Hotel, this is fine in this direction, but I go an alternative route home rather than try that roundabout. You'd want a heavy boot in a car some evenings!
I would imagine the O'Connell Street and Avenue, out towards the hospital be a safer route?
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10-01-2019, 06:46   #67
Mc Love
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I would imagine the O'Connell Street and Avenue, out towards the hospital be a safer route?
It would but it probably adds a bit more work haha
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10-01-2019, 07:30   #68
Squall Leonhart
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I would imagine the O'Connell Street and Avenue, out towards the hospital be a safer route?
It would probably, but there's a lot of stop starting and once you get to dooradoyle roundabout as far as Raheen it's quite busy that route also.
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10-01-2019, 07:32   #69
Lumen
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Originally Posted by bilbot79 View Post
When someone is cycling their concentration is spent on maintaining balance while levels of movement all over are changing constantly. The centre of balance is moving round all the time and some people have better balance than others. For these reasons, using one hand in a car or even a motorbike doesn't even compare with doing it on a bike. Although i wouldnt recommend it in any vehicle.
That's complete nonsense.

The centre of balance does not move around while cycling. Your legs are going around in a perfect counterbalanced circle.

Controlling a bicycle is a semi-conscious activity for all but the most beginnery beginner.

I was cycling home one evening a few years ago with my hands lightly on the hoods and hit a massive pothole I didn't see coming. In a fraction of a second it bounced my hands off the tops, I looked down and saw my hands holding the drops with a perfect grip. This required my brain to effectively catch a set of rapidly rising bars I wasn't looking at, in almost complete darkness.

I have completely unexceptional balance and terrible hand-eye coordination, as anyone who has has seen me attempt to play sport can attest.

The human brain is mostly not thinking about what the body is doing.
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10-01-2019, 08:02   #70
bilbot79
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That's complete nonsense.

The centre of balance does not move around while cycling. Your legs are going around in a perfect counterbalanced circle.

Controlling a bicycle is a semi-conscious activity for all but the most beginnery beginner.

I was cycling home one evening a few years ago with my hands lightly on the hoods and hit a massive pothole I didn't see coming. In a fraction of a second it bounced my hands off the tops, I looked down and saw my hands holding the drops with a perfect grip. This required my brain to effectively catch a set of rapidly rising bars I wasn't looking at, in almost complete darkness.

I have completely unexceptional balance and terrible hand-eye coordination, as anyone who has has seen me attempt to play sport can attest.

The human brain is mostly not thinking about what the body is doing.
I think it is moving around, albeit slightly, same happens for a tightrope walker. I can cycle over speed bumps with no hands easily but I would be nervous if I had one hand out to indicate left and had to deal with a sudden hazard.

Imagine braking hard with only one hand on the bars while turning for example. You could easily mess it up. An older relative hit a kerb with both hands on the bars, fell of and broke her arm. Imagine her cycling with one arm signalling. People are different.
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10-01-2019, 08:14   #71
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my 2c - balance comes with practice. someone not used to cycling will of course feel far less steady with one hand off the bars. it's a question of getting used to it.
i remember a few years ago, after nearly 10 years off the bike, i was disappointed at how bad i was at going hands free. now it's a piece of piss.
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10-01-2019, 14:43   #72
Mc Love
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Came across these two options and both look quite good

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Signal-Pod-...TP8ZZ6P6JVRDTG

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ampulla-Rec...TP8ZZ6P6JVRDTG
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10-01-2019, 20:02   #73
flatface
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I much prefer to indicate with road position than with my hands. Hands rely on someone yielding but position takes control of the situation. Specially at night.
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11-01-2019, 16:35   #74
CramCycle
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Originally Posted by bilbot79 View Post
I think it is moving around, albeit slightly, same happens for a tightrope walker. I can cycle over speed bumps with no hands easily but I would be nervous if I had one hand out to indicate left and had to deal with a sudden hazard.

Imagine braking hard with only one hand on the bars while turning for example. You could easily mess it up. An older relative hit a kerb with both hands on the bars, fell of and broke her arm. Imagine her cycling with one arm signalling. People are different.
It takes milliseconds for your brain to override your decision to indicate and reach back to the bar. You won't have actually thought about it in a conscious way. I have hit loads of bumps etc with no hands on the bars and before you realise, and it is actually difficult to resist, your hands are on the bars in milliseconds.
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11-01-2019, 17:22   #75
bilbot79
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It takes milliseconds for your brain to override your decision to indicate and reach back to the bar. You won't have actually thought about it in a conscious way. I have hit loads of bumps etc with no hands on the bars and before you realise, and it is actually difficult to resist, your hands are on the bars in milliseconds.
Same for me. But not everybody and the point is this balance business is an extra pressure on a cyclist that motorists don't have. Easier and safer to be able to use your index finger to hit a button
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