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24-10-2010, 15:29   #91
 
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Good thread; it got me wondering where Ó Néill, Ruairí Ó Dónaill and those who led the Irish side in the Nine Years War are buried.
Thanks dionysis -any idea how they died and what they did when they got there.

These guys were skilled soldiers.

I often wonder whether like other nobles around Europe " they had issue"
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06-11-2010, 19:57   #92
 
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This is a very interesting thread to read lads i must say
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06-11-2010, 20:10   #93
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Not Irish but we visited there and thought you might be interested. there's a real vibe at this grave. hard to explain.
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07-11-2010, 11:56   #94
 
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Tomb of St Columbanus in Bobbio, Italy. He died in 615 AD. He was one of the greatest Irish missionaries of the period. He founded schools and monasteries all across Europe. Pilgrims still go to the tomb.

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07-11-2010, 12:18   #95
 
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Thanks dionysis -any idea how they died and what they did when they got there.

These guys were skilled soldiers.

I often wonder whether like other nobles around Europe " they had issue"

The Great Hugh O'Neill is buried in the church of San Pietro, Montoria, Rome. He died in Rome in 1616 apparently from an illness which caused a fever. Here are images of the church and the tombstone.




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15-11-2010, 03:01   #96
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hi all,first time posting in this section

i have one to add..its rory gallagher

he's buried in Saint Oliver's Cemetery, Model Farm Road, Cork



The design was modeled after an award that Rory achieved in 1972,
International Guitarist of The Year.
The award was about 10 in high and sat on a marble base...
The edge of one of the rays was made to be an exact replica of a Stratocaster neck.
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15-11-2010, 03:36   #97
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Both Wilde and Beckett have been done but I'll post two pictures I took in Paris a few weeks ago of their graves.



Attached Images
File Type: jpg wilde.jpg (212.1 KB, 678 views)
File Type: jpg beckett.jpg (127.9 KB, 662 views)
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15-11-2010, 04:03   #98
 
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LOL at the lipstick on the Wilde Monument.Becketts headstone is as stylish as the man himself and reflects him as Wilde's does him.
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15-11-2010, 06:33   #99
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I wonder about yerman who was found in the Bastille when the French revolutionaries stormed it? The mad Irishman?
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15-11-2010, 08:28   #100
 
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His name was james Whyte - Comte de Malleville and his story is here .

Following his release he was given a place to stay by some for the night -robbed it - and was locked up again in an asylum Charenton.






More here


http://www.irishmeninparis.org/frame...mesfxwhyte.htm

It would be interesting to know where he is buried.
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15-11-2010, 12:09   #101
 
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And there is more on the guy
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Friday, July 17. 2009

Bastille connection, by James O'Fee


Nicholas Whyte

Nicholas Whyte is an Ulster-born acquaintance with an amazing family connection with the Bastille. Once Nicholas asked to meet me in Belfast when I had been active in the postal Diplomacy hobby for some years and Nicholas was first becoming interested in the game of Diplomacy.

We're now back in touch through a social networking site and, through it, I have learned of the amazing Whyte family connection with the Bastille, the royal prison stormed by the Paris sans-culottes on 14th July 1798, an event commemorated by the French today as their most important national festival.

The claim to fame of Chevalier James F.X. Whyte (Dublin, 1730-Charenton, 179…), also known as Comte Whyte de Malleville, rests on his presence in the Bastille on the day the prison was stormed on July 14, 1789.

In fact, he was one of only seven (or six, it depends on who you read) prisoners that the Revolutionaries “liberated” from the Bastille that day, and one of two certified lunatics. Whyte’s perilous mental state did not stop his liberators from parading him through the streets and proclaiming him a hero of the revolution. According to Richard Hayes’ Biographical Dictionary of Irishmen in France, “an eyewitness of the day’s events describes him as ‘a little feeble old man who exhibited an appearance of childishness and fatuity, tottering as he walked and his countenance exhibiting little more than the smile of an idiot.’” Another witness described Whyte as having “a beard almost a yard long”, and as “wearing the smile of an idiot”.


Hero of the Revolution

When released, he is said to have declared himself “majeur de l’immensité”. A sympathetic citizen gave Whyte shelter for the night, but the Irishman pillaged the house of his benefactor. The following day, the hero of the Revolution was locked up again – this time in the lunatic asylum in Charenton, where he was to spend the rest of his days. Ironically, before the Revolution, Whyte’s family had tried to avoid having him placed in Charenton because of the harshness of the regime there. So much for ‘liberté, fraternité’ etc…But at least in Charenton, he would have hooked up with his acquaintance, the Marquis Sade, who had been shipped to Charenton from the Bastille on July 4, 1789.

Whyte had followed a military career in France after leaving Ireland and rose to the grade of captain in Lally’s regiment of the Irish Brigade. He suffered a mental breakdown in 1781 and was confined in a hospital in Vincennes and then to the Bastille three years later (along with the Marquis de Sade) when the institution in Vincennes was closed. In March 1789, he was deprived of his civil rights and his property was transferred to his daughters.


See Irishmen in Paris.

Nicholas adds -

I suspect that he [Chevalier James F.X. Whyte:Ed] was a grandson of Charles Whyte who was Jacobite MP for Naas and governor of Kildare in the 1689-92 war. Though there were other continental family connections - James II's ambassador in the Hague was Sir Ignatius Whyte, another cousin (and yet the Dutch invaded).
http://www.impalapublications.com/bl...ames-OFee.html
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20-11-2010, 03:26   #102
 
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There is a sign just outside Arklow for the grave of Liam Mellows. I followed the direction the sign indicated but then reached another crossroad with no sign, so inevitably drove around in circles for ages until I gave up. Anybody know where it is??
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21-11-2010, 22:29   #103
 
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A memorial to Brian Boru in Armagh's St Patricks Cathedral the place of his burial.


ancient Irish cross still, it is said, marks the spot."
Quote:
Corcoran, one of the marshals of Brian, was the first to fly to the tent of the monarch with the intelligence of the death of his son Murrough. He found Brian kneeling before a crucifix; and the heroic old warrior, on hearing the sad news, though that the battle had been one by the Danes, and instantly said: "Do you, and the other chiefs fly to Armagh, and communicate my will to the successor of St. Patrick. But as for me, I came here to conquer or die, and the enemy shall not boast that I fell by inglorious wounds." At this instant, Brodar, The Dane, with a small party, rushing in their despair towards a small wood near which Brian's tent was erected, resolved, in the madness of his desperate rage, to be avenged for the defeat of his countrymen by killing the king of Ireland. The aged but heroic Brian, seeing them rush into the tent, seized his great two-handed sword, and with one blow, cut off the legs of the first Dane that entered. Brodar, entering next, struck Brian on the back of his head with his axe; but in spite of the stunning wound, Brian, with all the might strength for which he was renowned, by a fortunate stroke, cut off the head of Broder, and killed the third Dane that attacked him; and then calmly resigned himself to death. Thus, in the eighty-eighth year of his age, in the midst of conquest, fell one of the bravest, wisest, and noblest of all the kings of Ireland, whose reign exhibits the most splendid display of glory in all the annals of his country. His long life is a jewel that his country will wear forever, irradiating his glory upon the humblest of her sons........The Danes were pursued to their ships, Dublin was captured........Which to discover the fleeing enemy..........says.
The remains of Brian were conveyed to Armagh by the whole army. With Brian, some accounts say, went also the bodies of Murrough, Conaing, and Moltha; and that their obsequies were celebrated for twelve days by the clergy of Armagh, after which the body of Brian was deposited in a stone coffin on the north side of the high altar in the great cathedral, the body of Murrough, it is said, being interred on the south side of the church. The remains of Turlough, and several other chieftains, were buried in the old churchyard of Kilmainham, known afterwards as "Bully's Acre," where the shaft of an

http://preachan.tripod.com/myths/brianboru1.html
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Saint Patrick's Church of Ireland Cathedral

Saint Patrick's Church of Ireland Cathedral
(authors collection)

Saint Patrick's Damhliag Mor, meaning Great Stone Church, has been burnt and plundered several times by the Vikings and lighting. The roofless church was neglected in the eleventh century, until Archbishop Celsus roofed it with shingles in 1125.
The Saint Patrick's Church of Ireland Cathedral, also known as the Anglican Cathedral, was built in the thirteenth century on the same site as the Damhliag Mor. There is nothing left of the original church, beside perhaps the bases of the tower piers. Bad luck haunted the site when the new Cathedral was partially burnt by accident in the fourteenth century.
Further damage was done in the sixteenth century during the Reformation and the following Plantation of Ulster. The Reformation not only caused structural damage, but also the theft of three important relics of the Cathedral.
Probably the most important relic was the crosier of Saint Patrick. According to the legends a this crosier was given to Saint Patrick by a hermit to whom it was delivered by Jesus, hence the name Bachal Isa, or Staff of Jesus. This crosier was taken to Dublin, stripped from its gems and ornaments and, with other relics, publicly burnt in 1538 in the High Street.
The two other relics which were stolen from the Cathedral, the Black Bell of Saint Patrick and Liber Ardmachanus, or The Book of Armagh, survived the madness and are now in the National Museum of Ireland and in the Trinity College Library respectively.
Archbishop Richard Robinson, who is also responsible for the Armagh Public Library and the Armagh Observatory, rebuilt the Cathedral in 1765 and gave it its present shape.
In the churchyard north from the Cathedral you can find the burial site of Brian Boru, who died in the Battle of Clontarf in 1014. Actually Brian Boru was too old to participate in the battle and he was killed in his tent by a fleeing Viking. A granite commemorating slab in the west wall of the northern transept can be confusing because it only mention the real name of Brian Boru: Brian Boroimhe.
Inside the Cathedral in the north aisle are the remains of a eleventh century High Cross with scenes of the old and new testament. This High Cross stood once on the Market Street, but was destroyed in 1813. After laying on the churchyard for over a century it was more or less reconstructed and placed inside the Cathedral.
The Cathedral also holds several army standards and flags among which a French tricolour. This flag was captured in 1798 by the Armagh Light Infantry from the invading French army led by General Humbert. It is the only foreign flag ever captured on British Isles.
http://www.triskelle.eu/attractions/armagh.php
ttp://www.discoverireland.com/us/ireland-things-to-see-and-do/listings/product/?fid=NITB_3095
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24-11-2010, 00:56   #104
 
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Both Wilde and Beckett have been done but I'll post two pictures I took in Paris a few weeks ago of their graves.


I must say I find it sad that Wilde's grave has been allowed to be debased in this way. I visited the grave in the 90s and then around 2001 and it was not at all written on. I know that his grandson - Merlin Holland - usually takes care of his family graves so I am surprised that he has not seen to this.
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24-11-2010, 02:29   #105
 
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I must say I find it sad that Wilde's grave has been allowed to be debased in this way. I visited the grave in the 90s and then around 2001 and it was not at all written on. I know that his grandson - Merlin Holland - usually takes care of his family graves so I am surprised that he has not seen to this.
Pere LeChaise is a huge graveyard, Jim Morrison (of the Doors) is also buries there. and his grave gets the same treatment.

I think the authorities clean it up once a year.

Oscar is a bit of an icon.
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