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12-03-2019, 16:58   #31
Coyler
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Originally Posted by Simple_Simone View Post
Yep, as I wrote, the NPPR was ex Green Party leader John Gormley's brainchild.

The fine for non-payment was introduced by the then Minister for Environment and Local Government, Phil Hogan.

Now, wipe that rabid foam off your mouth, make your self a nice mug of tea and stop being nasty about cuddly Mick Noonan!
May I wash my mouth out and say three Hail Mary's

Seriously, though, thanks for the correction. Always good to have things clarified.
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12-03-2019, 16:59   #32
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Originally Posted by Askthe EA View Post
Doubt that. GDPR.
You are indeed correct. Wasn't clear. They will tell you if you were paying the bill or not at the very least. Best place to start. The years they can't tell you about are still useful.
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12-03-2019, 18:19   #33
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Doubt that. GDPR.
You can ask for your own data from EIRGRID, which if you were the registered user would mean they have details of your bills. If you were not the registered owner the information is useless anyway.
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12-03-2019, 18:22   #34
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Originally Posted by daddy pig View Post

NPPR was a self declaration charge and there was a huge amount of advertising at the time so the excuse that you didn't know will not wash. As far as taking legal action on this I can guarantee you that it is a complete waste of time and money.
The legal action would not be on the basis of not knowing about it. the legal action would be on the basis of the constitutionality of the Oireachtas imposing penalties and not the courts.
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12-03-2019, 21:20   #35
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We're considering selling a site in Dublin if we get the right offer. There is a dwelling house on the site but it was in our opinion uninhabitable during the entire time the NPPR applied. It was last occupied ca. 2000 and in 2008 after my father passed away we gutted it completely (even removing kitchen units and all bathroom fittings leaving it completely bare). The windows had already been boarded up around 2000.

If we have to swallow the 7.2k we will but does anyone think we have genuine grounds to claim an exemption?
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12-03-2019, 21:24   #36
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We're considering selling a site in Dublin if we get the right offer. There is a dwelling house on the site but it was in our opinion uninhabitable during the entire time the NPPR applied. It was last occupied ca. 2000 and in 2008 after my father passed away we gutted it completely (even removing kitchen units and all bathroom fittings leaving it completely bare). The windows had already been boarded up around 2000.

If we have to swallow the 7.2k we will but does anyone think we have genuine grounds to claim an exemption?
the definition of dwelling for NPPR purposes is very wide. Did it have a roof?
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12-03-2019, 21:26   #37
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the definition of dwelling for NPPR purposes is very wide. Did it have a roof?
Yes.
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12-03-2019, 21:47   #38
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Yes.
You will have problems so.
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12-03-2019, 22:13   #39
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Originally Posted by murphaph View Post
We're considering selling a site in Dublin if we get the right offer. There is a dwelling house on the site but it was in our opinion uninhabitable during the entire time the NPPR applied. It was last occupied ca. 2000 and in 2008 after my father passed away we gutted it completely (even removing kitchen units and all bathroom fittings leaving it completely bare). The windows had already been boarded up around 2000.

If we have to swallow the 7.2k we will but does anyone think we have genuine grounds to claim an exemption?
You have genuine grounds for claiming an exemption if it had neither a kitchen nor a bathroom.
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12-03-2019, 22:24   #40
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No sympathy. I see this catching alot of people however it was heavily advertised at the time but people just didn't bother.
The 200 or 250 per year was a small amount. What they then did was added 20 per month penalty. When this went to second year unpaid, you were paying 40 per month penalty etc.
There was then a period when people were allowed to pay 4k or so to completely discharge the debt and at that stage if you contacted the council there were option for part payment or instalments etc. If you still ignored all, it went to 7k plus and was to be recovered by revenue on sale or transfer of the property.
I believe that it will no longer be collected after a certain date so if you hold the property long enough it will be ok, otherwise it's owed and no way out if selling today.
Some interesting advice here. Am I right to understand that this charge becomes "dead, not collectable etc " after 2023 ?

I have a holiday home, purchased in 2007, did`nt pay the NPPR, was told by the County Council that I have to pay the €7200.

Property tax paid up to date by the way
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12-03-2019, 22:27   #41
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Originally Posted by Drifter50 View Post
Some interesting advice here. Am I right to understand that this charge becomes "dead, not collectable etc " after 2023 ?

I have a holiday home, purchased in 2007, did`nt pay the NPPR, was told by the County Council that I have to pay the €7200.

Property tax paid up to date by the way
Wait until either you sell, the council issue proceedings, or 2025.
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12-03-2019, 22:27   #42
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I've done a spot of googling. Donegal CC have a cheat sheet in PDF form. it says the following:

.3 UNINHABITABLE
An exemption is being sought on the basis that the property was
uninhabitable. Copy of Land Registry Folio for the property, to be provided in
all cases.
 Photographs of the property and a declaration of the condition of the property,
including details of when it was last occupied, should be submitted as part of
a covering letter.
 Details of the planning reference number if the property is a new build.
 Alternatively, if the property is for sale, details of the estate agent who is
selling the property or a property brochure should be submitted.
 The following criteria is referenced in determining if a property is
uninhabitable:
 Does the property have a sound roof?
 Is it so affected by dampness as to make it unsuitable for habitation?
 Does it have toilet / bathroom facilities?
 Does it have a heating system?
 Does it have a water supply? (a supply that is disconnected only would
not deem a property uninhabitable).
 Does it have windows and doors?
 Does it have an electricity supply connected? (a supply that is
disconnected only would not deem a property uninhabitable)
 Is the house dilapidated and run down?
 Does it require major repairs to make it habitable?
A number of the above criteria will have to be met to deem the property
uninhabitable. If necessary, an inspection can be carried out following receipt of
the above information. If the property was undergoing renovations during the
years 2009 – 2013, evidence to support this, in the form of receipts, photographs,
etc, should be submitted.
The Council reserves the right to seek further clarification should the need
arise.

We'd have no issue with them inspecting it. In fact we applied for PP for a change of use in 2009 with photographs of the outside all boarded up. This might help. It would all be on record with SDCC.
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12-03-2019, 23:36   #43
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Originally Posted by murphaph View Post
We're considering selling a site in Dublin if we get the right offer. There is a dwelling house on the site but it was in our opinion uninhabitable during the entire time the NPPR applied. It was last occupied ca. 2000 and in 2008 after my father passed away we gutted it completely (even removing kitchen units and all bathroom fittings leaving it completely bare). The windows had already been boarded up around 2000.

If we have to swallow the 7.2k we will but does anyone think we have genuine grounds to claim an exemption?
If it had a roof and a water supply and had the capability to be reconnected to electricity then it was habitable.
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13-03-2019, 07:56   #44
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If it had a roof and a water supply and had the capability to be reconnected to electricity then it was habitable.
Are you familiar with the process? It does seem a little at odds with that Donegal CC memo, which us not as black and white.
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13-03-2019, 09:01   #45
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Are you familiar with the process? It does seem a little at odds with that Donegal CC memo, which us not as black and white.
I would go to a solicitor with your information and ask them how best to proceed - will set you back a few hundred but could save you a few thousand.

If you go to the solicitor who will be involved in the sale it may not cost anything extra
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