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25-10-2018, 10:20   #16
10000maniacs
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The landlords Association are jumping up and down with rage this morning on the radio.
Oh what a beautiful morning.
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25-10-2018, 10:28   #17
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There are properties around Grand Canal Dock to rent on Airbnb and it is clear the tenant can't afford the rent so supplements it with Airbnb. I'm happy these people will ow have to vacate or take a permanent tenant with them.
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25-10-2018, 10:40   #18
handlemaster
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Taking the piss by using residential properties for holiday lets.

We have planning laws for exactly this reason - to ensure that the needs of society are met and properly balanced against the rights of property owners.

If you want to rent out a holiday property, you need to ensure that the property you are renting out is classed as a holiday property. If it's not, then you are in breach of planning law.

The government aren't changing anything, simply calling to enforce long-standing rules.

Landlords know damn well that they are not legally permitted to rent out residential properties on AirBnB. But they do it anyway.

These properties need to go back into the market proper; either sold or rented to long-term tenants.

ok. sit back and watch rental prices go alot higher in these areas.Then another thread will be government plan back fires. . shocker. Same issue with bedsits
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25-10-2018, 10:41   #19
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The landlords Association are jumping up and down with rage this morning on the radio.
Oh what a beautiful morning.
in the end tenants will pay more
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25-10-2018, 10:44   #20
 
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Good. More properties on the market.

Unfortunately I don't think they'd be rentals.
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25-10-2018, 10:48   #21
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There are properties around Grand Canal Dock to rent on Airbnb and it is clear the tenant can't afford the rent so supplements it with Airbnb. I'm happy these people will ow have to vacate or take a permanent tenant with them.
As it's not the entire property it's not breaking any planning law is it?
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25-10-2018, 10:50   #22
10000maniacs
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in the end tenants will pay more
But there are restrictions on landlords upping the rent. I think its 4%.
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25-10-2018, 10:52   #23
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Hang on, what would this mean for tourists coming to Dublin? Less Air BnB places to rent so forced to stay in hotels? Where there is an ever increasing hospitality tax.
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25-10-2018, 10:53   #24
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The landlords Association are jumping up and down with rage this morning on the radio.
Oh what a beautiful morning.
The Landlord association jumping up and down is instructive. It confirms what was long debated or deflected on this forum: the short term letting market has been the path for many supposed residential properties. Effectively meaning large swathes of "landlords" are infact hoteliers without the correct planning permission or other regulatory standards.
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25-10-2018, 10:55   #25
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Hang on, what would this mean for tourists coming to Dublin? Less Air BnB places to rent so forced to stay in hotels? Where there is an ever increasing hospitality tax.
Tourists are down the consideration list in the midst of a housing crisis and when the core economy is booming. But yes, they should be staying in hotels or guest houses with appropriate PPR.

Last edited by LuckyLloyd; 25-10-2018 at 11:03.
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25-10-2018, 10:57   #26
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Accommodation in this country is basically some sort of Fleshy Tetris at this stage.

This is a pain in the hole for us as a family who use air BnB in Dublin, more than anything else.

It's almost impossible to find a hotel setup that can accommodate adults and kids (plus dog sometimes), so renting an apt or house for a few days near family was really bloody handy! 

It was part of a wider range of accommodation offerings. This smacks of sticking the homeless in hotel rooms, putting hospital patients into nursing homes, or leaving them sit in A&E for eternity instead of fixing the root cause.
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25-10-2018, 10:58   #27
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There are properties around Grand Canal Dock to rent on Airbnb and it is clear the tenant can't afford the rent so supplements it with Airbnb. I'm happy these people will ow have to vacate or take a permanent tenant with them.
They won't. Renting out a room in your own home is not in breach of planning laws. AirBnB isn't being outlawed; people will still be permitted to rent out rooms in their home, or rent out their homes for short periods. It will also be legal to continue to offer holiday homes on AirBnB.

It just won't be permitted for someone to offer their Non-PPR on AirBnB.

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ok. sit back and watch rental prices go alot higher in these areas.
How so? These are properties that are not being rented right now. How will their removal from AirBnB increase rental prices?

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Unfortunately I don't think they'd be rentals.
It doesn't really matter, it's all the same market. Private residential properties for sale, eases the pressure on the rental market.

The two markets affect eachother, any increase in availability in one, increases availability in the other.
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25-10-2018, 11:01   #28
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The largest Air bnb host in Barcelona has potential daily rental income at peak season of over 37,000 Euro. They own over 200 flats. The whole holiday rental market has to be regulated, not just because it affects residential rentals but because it affects how communities function, the quality of life of residents and potentially even what amenities are needed.

Last edited by meeeeh; 25-10-2018 at 11:11.
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25-10-2018, 11:10   #29
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Anecdotally, I searched my own estate on AirBnB the other day, and found 4 properties in our location alone. By the user profile's own admission, he was resident in another area of Dublin and running this as a primary(?) source of income. Our estate is very family oriented, with parents + 2/3 kids squeezed into tiny 1 bed apartments, while these 4 houses lie effectively fallow, save for intermittent visitors paying 300-400 euro a night.

AirBnB is one of those quintessential high-minded tech companies: in principal their idea was cute & personable - it's a genuinely nice idea to holiday somewhere and have a local's hospitality as a base - but the reality is it left a gaping loophole for quick n' easy cash at the expense of a reasonable housing market for locals.

The knock-on effect can be pronounced too: I believe in some areas particularly affected by AirBnB, local businesses - cafés, shops, utilities etc. - have seen their own business shrivel because of course, there are fewer locals living in the apartments / estates anymore that contribute to the community.
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25-10-2018, 11:12   #30
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Originally Posted by pekitivey View Post
Hang on, what would this mean for tourists coming to Dublin? Less Air BnB places to rent so forced to stay in hotels? Where there is an ever increasing hospitality tax.
13.5% VAT is one of the lowest total tax takes on hotels in the world. 20%+ sales tax and a city night tax is normal elsewhere.
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