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07-01-2018, 00:07   #16
Jellybaby1
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Our family home was occupied by my ancestors for over a hundred years ending in the 1980's so I know about those residents, before them there were a few small businesses. Wish I'd thought of a TV series! My version of the Forsyth Saga!
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07-01-2018, 01:47   #17
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I was delighted to see the presenter of this series too. Did he write it as well? He made a previous series on black people in Britain and twas very interesting. I'm looking forward to the next episode.
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07-01-2018, 10:14   #18
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Right: back on topic you lot. David Olusoga is really very attractive, isn't he?

I think it's a brilliant idea for a show: combining the stuff WDYTYA does in a new fresh way. He's a good presenter and yes he did write it too. I have his Black & British book but haven't read it yet.
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07-01-2018, 23:01   #19
Jellybaby1
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[QUOTE=pinkypinky;105759455]Right: back on topic you lot. David Olusoga is really very attractive, isn't he?

Well yes he is! (I'm furtively smirking but too old to do it right!)
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18-01-2018, 22:43   #20
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Have to say the endless assumptions and overindulgence in sentimentality is starting to ruin this for me.
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19-01-2018, 18:44   #21
pinkypinky
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Have to say the endless assumptions and overindulgence in sentimentality is starting to ruin this for me.
Oh really. Will you elaborate?
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19-01-2018, 20:03   #22
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Assumptions as to what the occupants were like as people, from toys on the floor to the parents regard for their children. All we really know for sure about them is the written documentary evidence. Everything else is in the realms of speculation and to speculate too much is actually to make the picture less vivid than it might otherwise be.

Overindulgence in sentimentality on the theme of people triumphing over adversity. There's no doubt that some of the occupants of No. 62 had to overcome huge challenges in their time but there's a limit to how often you can make this point before it begins to sound gushing.

Overall it's a great programme, well researched and well presented, but in last nights episode I felt the standard dropped as the presenter veered too far in the direction of populism.

Last edited by Hermy; 20-01-2018 at 22:19. Reason: o
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01-02-2018, 23:12   #23
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What did people think of the final episode?

I was expecting there might be a sudden jump towards the end to the present owner, owing to time constraints and a lack of interesting events to speak of, but no such thing. He tracked down every recorded occupancy and dealt with each in turn, and, just as throughout the earlier episodes, there were stories to tell. The woman who posed for John Lennon was fascinating to listen to. The Toxteth riots were striking for the way the various creeds and colours came together in revolt against the neglect they were subjected to. And then the AIDS epidemic which I remember but didn't fully understand at the time.

And I really liked that he spent some time with the present occupier of 62. It just finished things off nicely.
More of this please BBC.
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02-02-2018, 09:43   #24
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I really liked the last episode. Also expected they might skip forward in time but the stats at the end saying how many people had lived in the house that they'd traced, etc was great. I did really want to know what the current owner did for a living to own such a big house solo but that's just nosiness.
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10-04-2019, 00:29   #25
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Yay it's back on BBC. Newcastle is the setting this time
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10-04-2019, 10:08   #26
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Yes, first episode on Monday. Was vg.
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10-04-2019, 15:02   #27
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Yes, first episode on Monday. Was vg.
It was indeed and all the better as the lovely Mr Olusoga is from Newcastle. I'd really love to see this programme done from an Irish city.
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11-04-2019, 00:03   #28
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First episode of the second series was very good, really enjoyed it. The UK census is a great asset to have.
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11-04-2019, 09:29   #29
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The one thing that jarred with me was the portrayal of the 14 year old umbrella nickers as children. Of course they were young (and didn't probably deserve what happned them) and by today's standards 'children', but in 1820 they would have been of working age.
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11-04-2019, 11:35   #30
pedroeibar1
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Saw the first episode – interesting but not great. I’d like more on the architectural history of the house – building methods, style, material, etc..

The two ‘boys’ were lucky not to have been hanged – in 1820 stealing anything worth more than 5 shillings (about 50 euro in today’s value) often led to hanging which in those days also was in public. Even for lesser theft offences a transportation sentence of 5 or 7 years was the norm for the poorer classes.

As a result of hitherto non-capital offences being deemed capital (the ‘Bloody Code’) during the 1700’s, the Statute books of England by 1823 held 222 crimes punishable by death. Prison reform commenced that year also (e.g. Elizabeth Fry) , and between that year and 1837, the death penalty was eliminated for over 100 ‘capital crimes’.

However, Ireland had to wait until the ‘Capital Punishment (Ireland) Act 1842 (5 & 6 Vict c.28) brought the law in Ireland closer to that of England by reducing the penalties for numerous offences.

Transportation was the norm for theft – the jails were full/overcrowded, American independence closed that market for ‘indentured servants’ (i.e. slaves) so Australia became the destination until about 1850 when the authorities out there got fed up of being a dumping ground and put a stop to it.
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