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28-03-2021, 23:17   #1
looksee
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Name/type of joint

Can anyone tell me the name or type of joint you would use in the following circumstances. I can't post a pic as I cannot find one that shows the joint and I want to be able to talk to someone about it.

Building a pergola from 6" timber, no roof just basic framework. I want it to be very simple looking of substantial timber with minimum uprights and cross beams.

There is an upright, then a beam across for the length, cut into each other, continuous beam to the front. Then a beam going across the width, cut into the other two. So you have a solid three way joint.

I can visualise the upright having a half lap at the very top with the long beam cut into it, but how do you put in the cross beam without losing strength. If you cut down into the top of the upright so it was reduced to a 3"x3" section, with a 3" section on the cross beam, would it be strong enough, and how would you bolt it?

If I used 6x3 timber for the beams I can easily see how it could be done, but would it look solid?

I hope this is clear enough, any help appreciated.
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29-03-2021, 14:33   #2
Calahonda52
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IMO would weaken it too much
https://www.shedfactoryireland.ie/ie...UaAtIpEALw_wcB
or the more conventional way
https://www.woodford.ie/product/woodford-pergola/
which I prefer as you can cap the end grain in the post to avoid rain getting into the grain
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29-03-2021, 18:30   #3
looksee
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Thanks for that, though that is the look I am trying to avoid, but I may not have a choice in the matter.

https://www.pinterest.ie/pin/334321972344362745/

This is the kind of look I would like to go for, but reading odd bits of info (I finally found the right rabbithole to go down) it looks as though it would be looking for complicated mortice and tennon joints that I doubt I could afford even if I could find someone to do them.

I am trying to avoid lots of galvanised joiners while still going for a simple look.

I may consider going the route of having deliberate ironmongery that is part of the structure, if I can find it. There is an excellent metal worker near me that would do it for me if I can come up with the designs.
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07-04-2021, 20:50   #4
kadman
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Do it like a chinese temple builder

https://www.core77.com/posts/67922/T...rthquake-Proof
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07-04-2021, 20:51   #5
kadman
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Or Japanese perhaps,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lejRwON-WaY
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11-04-2021, 19:23   #6
Bonzo Delaney
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kadman View Post
A beautiful mixture of artistry, craftsmanship and witchcraft
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11-05-2021, 22:22   #7
tabby aspreme
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Some ingenious old Irish joinery, the house was built in the 1700s, and this front doorframe may have been the original, curved sections joined to each other, and the stiles using wedges.
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11-05-2021, 23:03   #8
kadman
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Hammer head tenons.


Now replaced with 5x100 screws,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammer...rHeadedKey.png
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11-05-2021, 23:42   #9
kadman
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Back in the day ( giving away my age now) early 70's working in London,

one of the first jobs I was given on site, was to make a pair of sliding sashes for
up and down sash windows. At that time it was common place to buy the sash material length
in the local hardware, as well as all the pao components for the frames as well. And then make them ob site
to fit into the opes. Along with the stop beads, parting beads and fittings.
Remember it well.

Handmade haunched tenons, and hammered mortices, so tools had to be sharp.

Non of this order from the local joinery rubbish. All handmade on site.

Different times indeed.
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08-06-2021, 00:57   #10
policarp
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Try Japonese joinery.
They're amazing for all kinds of timber joints.
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08-06-2021, 01:21   #11
Spook_ie
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Would any of these free plans suit?

https://www.thespruce.com/free-pergola-plans-1357132
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08-06-2021, 08:37   #12
CelticRambler
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The wonderful algorithms of YouTube recommended this video to me the other day, which reminded me of this thread.



It's all in French (and will certainly lose some of the clever, very subtle humour in translation) but sure maybe it'll make some of ye feel like ye've had a bit of a foreign holiday.
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