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02-07-2015, 00:36   #1
sarkozy
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Damaged white Formica worktop - how to repair?

I stupidly dropped something heavy on our white formica kitchen worktop. The worktop itself is solid birch plywood. Now there's a deep crack in the surface with some of the brown material showing.

This kitchen is out pride and joy.

Is there anyway to fill/repair?
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02-07-2015, 09:45   #2
sarkozy
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Or how much, generally, to remove the worktop, strip, relay the formica and re-install worktop?
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02-07-2015, 11:00   #3
tabby aspreme
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Could you put up some pics of the damage
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02-07-2015, 11:10   #4
adelcrowsmel
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You can buy seamfill or something similar to fill cracks in your desired colour for minor repairs - I got a friend of mine to pick me up some of this in the US when they were there to fix my black countertop and it did the job perfectly as it was only a small crack/repair.
Its also worth checking to see how much it would cost to replace the whole section of countertop - most good fitters will replace a countertop without damaging tiles etc around it - I also had this done recently to one side of the kitchen as I unfortunatley oven cleaner leaked onto the countertop and it stripped the colour off - the fitting cost me €120 ontop of the price of the actual countertop itself, but maybe go back to your kitchen fitter and suss out a price if filling the crack doesn't do a good enough job.
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02-07-2015, 16:38   #5
sarkozy
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I wouldn't go back to the fitter who did our worktop!

Here are two photos. It's hard to see the indentation. It's deepest where the dark mark is (where the Formica chipped off), and there's a shallow slope down to that darker patch.

I've ordered some Formica samples so I can match the colour with ColorFill. The joiner doing the other job thinks this is worth a go and it may work, but I should practice first. He wasn't so hot on replacing the worktop.

One approach, suggested to me by another company, would be to 'burn off' or remove with heat (and acetone) the layer of Formica already on and attempt to re-apply a new sheet in situ. Perhaps this is possible, but it would be quite labour intensive. Perhaps I could do some of the prep work to save costs (we're broke) and have the expert in to fit the laminate - I've been looking at a few videos about the process.
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02-07-2015, 19:32   #6
recipio
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Is it actually formica or more commonly melamine ?
Either would resist a gentle steaming and the dent would raise up a little. A white filler and a spray of white enamel paint should get it back to near normal but I would practice on some scrap first.
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03-07-2015, 01:39   #7
sarkozy
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It's definitely Formica brand Formica, from their Colour Core range. I might have an offcut to practice on. I reckon I'll try the ColorFill once I get the exact colour reference. Do you think I should lightly sand the interior of the dent to help with adhesion of the filler?
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03-07-2015, 10:47   #8
recipio
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Originally Posted by sarkozy View Post
It's definitely Formica brand Formica, from their Colour Core range. I might have an offcut to practice on. I reckon I'll try the ColorFill once I get the exact colour reference. Do you think I should lightly sand the interior of the dent to help with adhesion of the filler?
No point in sanding the 'inside' of the crack - the filler will adhere to it. Press it in as level as possible with a spatula. You might need to sand the filler when hard but I would start at 240 grit - anything coarse will scratch the formica too much.
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03-07-2015, 11:03   #9
sarkozy
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This sounds promising. Have you successfully repaired with this product in the past?
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04-07-2015, 10:49   #10
recipio
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This sounds promising. Have you successfully repaired with this product in the past?
Only to fill gaps between joins. I think you might have to accept a near perfect result. You won't think about it after a few months !
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05-07-2015, 10:29   #11
sarkozy
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Only to fill gaps between joins. I think you might have to accept a near perfect result. You won't think about it after a few months !
Sure. If it's well camouflaged, we could move on. In a few years, we'll probably replace the Formica anyway.

Here's hoping!
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06-07-2015, 03:40   #12
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Please let us know how you get on. I need to fix this shortly and I'm keen to see how yours turns out:

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