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15-08-2019, 12:47   #451
Feu
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Hi Leinster Dude, thanks for posting - honestly what you are describing could be a number of diverse conditions - it sounds a bit like me (feeling overwhelmed a lot) and i have dyspraxia. So see my post below for some stuff do before you meet the psychiatrist - really try to think about functional difficulties: is it memory/forgetfulness? disorganisation? zoning out? emotional regulation? adverse reaction to poor feedback/rejection? And specific examples where you set out to do small or large things and failed due to poor executive functioning.



Whatever the outcome, i would encourage you to have a discussion with your family about getting an assessment for your child - think about how difficult things are for you, and how you could prevent that for him


best of luck with the meeting, do let us know how you get on, there's loads of experience and support here for you!



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A psychiatrist may diagnose you in the one visit, depending who it is. This is a relatively painless process () just asking questions about your history and behaviour. Again it is worth having a think about this before you go along (although attending unprepared could be seen as symptomatic in itself ]), like what are the functional difficulties you are having, what impacts your day to day life. While many adults will not have "documentation" from when they were at school, it is actually worth bringing along a school report or something if you have one, they are often illuminating! Frequent comments along the lines of "X won't stay in their seat" or "X daydreams through class" can speak to history of these difficulties. If a clinical psychologist does the diagnosing, you will still need to see a psychiatrist or GP before medication is prescribed. Liz i think you said you were going to a psychiatrist, but if being diagnosed by a clinical psychologist, this can take up to 3-4 visits depending on the psychologist. You shouldn't have too many appointments if being diagnosed by a psychiatrist, but there will be follow up if medication is commenced.

If you have not already had your appointment, it is worth thinking ahead of time about whether you want to try medication or not, and discussing any concerns re: medication with the psychiatrist when you meet them. There's lots of research out there on the efficacy, side effects, long term outcomes of medication, mostly on children (i.e. started when kids, followed through to their late 20s/30's). Laurence Greenhill is one of the experts on this, he actually spoke here a couple of years ago, and he really knows his stuff: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18573923.
This is also a nice article on the European situation for adult treatment, although 6 years old: https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral....471-244X-10-67 That article states that stimulant medication is effective for about 70% of people with ADHD.

Most people say that stimulant medication is very effective in increasing focus, and decreasing distractability. Therefore doing what they want it to do. Some people express side effects such as reduced appetite (and when prescribed to children and adults they will monitor their weight), weight loss, nausea, sleep difficulties, and one of the reasons some people dislike it is a feeling of "not myself", which could be described as being less emotional, feeling "robotic", or even devoid of emotion. There is lots about this online, obviously. Cost really varies, I've seen from €65 a month to over €100, so definitely shop around.

There are lots of behavioural and environmental modifications that you can make apart from or in conjunction with medication. I have a lot to say about this, depending on the difficulties you are having, so maybe I'll hold off unless people are interested
In a nutshell, routine routine routine! Routine will help prevent/improve some of the functional difficulties associated with add/adhd e.g. losing things as mentioned by numerous posters above. I think it was also Cannex that mentioned having a little chest of drawers for like bills and things like that, that can so easily be lost or misplaced, and leaves people with ADHD tearing their hair out. Having a set place for things, and then developing the habit of always putting things there, can really work over time. Some people i work with have a literal checklist for when they come in the door, and for when they are leaving the house, to reduce stress and anxiety.

I think as well for people with a recent diagnosis of ADD/ADHD, considering seeing a counsellor, with experience/knowledge of the difficulties associated with ADHD would be beneficial. There is a high incidence of other difficulties correlated with ADD/ADHD particularly depression, anxiety, substance abuse and sleep disturbances. Some people are interested in ADHD coaches which is more of a thing in america

You could also consider seeing a life coach or OT on a regular basis, who may focus on the more practical side of things then therapy, like helping you set and achieve goals to reach a particular milestone in your life


Disclosing to your workplace can be a really good idea depending on the setting. Sometimes employers can be really supportive, and really open to modifying your role etc, and sometimes it is hard for them to understand the condition. Their attitude can depend on how much "this will affect the business", i.e. if it is quite easy to move you to a slightly different role, that's handy. Having a good idea of how things could be improved for you is helpful when thinking about having this discussion i.e. if i could change x and y, I will be able to work mostly independently, that kind of thing.
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Originally Posted by leinsterdude View Post
Hi all, first post...
I am 43, and have been all over the place all of my life, from school and not being able to concentrate, leaving school, and changing jobs way more than anyone else I know......I finally ended up in sales At aged 24, which suited me in terms of doing different things every day, but have moved so much within sales, that my cv looks a bit crazy.....I can be very intelligent, but get confused easily, get wires crossed so much.....someone can say something to me, and I hear it my own way, often wrong....I can read an email, see it one way, then read it again a week later and see it clearly then, after I already actioned it......I’m ok when not stressed or questioned, but if put under pressure I can fall down like a pack of cards, I recently took a promotion, which left me moving from sales into management, all numbers and excel sheets, I was under so much pressure, that in meetings I could not even see the numbers on the computer from feeling so swamped.......I quit that job, and was out of work for a month......have two kids, wife mortgage, so not ideal.....I see my younger son very like me, and Ai want to change, I have a referral for next week with a HSE psychiatrist, and don’t know if I am adhd, add, or not......what do you guys think ? My close family think I might be.......is diagnosis easy, I would be happy but not delighted to take meds if it helped me focus on life......I thought at 43 I would be clearly minded.....but I feel worse than ever.
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15-08-2019, 17:50   #452
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Thanks for that, will update here soon.
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29-08-2019, 13:53   #453
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Hi folks!
hope everyone is well?



This is just my annual reminder for the concentration affected who are in college/will be attending, to register with your disability service., or re-introduce yourself if you've been avoiding them!


There is a disability officer in every higher education institution in the country. You could avail of exam accommodations (extra time, smaller room), class accommodations (tech/software to make up for missing bits, extensions), and even Occupational Therapy if you are attending TCD, UCD, DCU, NUIG, UCC or CorkIT. Its well worth your time, and if you don't have a diagnosis, it may be worth your financial input to get a diagnosis to avail of the above.


If you don't want to go down that route, or don't yet have a diagnosis, most colleges have a student learning department, which can offer tech, notes, tutorials, writing centre and even 1:1 meetings to help you improve your learning skills and just make college easier. There are loads of supports out here for students, so take advantage of them!


Any Qs give me a shout
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25-09-2019, 11:19   #454
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I'm looking to be assessed for ADHD and have a few questions.
I have used my brother's ritalin prescription in the past and my family think how it worked for me confirms I have ADHD because the same problems were alleviated. But could mentioning that I've tried ritalin illegally bar me from getting that medication in the future?
Any specific experience with Stephanie Bourke from Blackrock Clinic?

Last question, I'm wondering do all the consultants give general cognitive assessments, or do some offer ADHD-specific? Do all of them encompass a screening for autism and IQ tests? I was told by a consultant that the person in St. Pats who assesses for ADHD has to do an overall cognitive assessment, not just ADHD, including both these things. For personal reasons I definitely don't want to know my IQ, and as an aside I'd also like to avoid knowing if I have autism or not if possible. I'm not implying there's anything wrong with autism, it's only the IQ thing that I feel feel is demeaning and I'd feel **** about even if I score above average. I'm fine thinking that I might be autistic, I'd just rather not be told where exactly I am on the autistic spectrum. Sorry for the little blog I just don't want someone to misinterpret and think I'm implying autism is something to be ashamed of.
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25-09-2019, 14:13   #455
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttrreeww View Post
I'm looking to be assessed for ADHD and have a few questions.
I have used my brother's ritalin prescription in the past and my family think how it worked for me confirms I have ADHD because the same problems were alleviated. But could mentioning that I've tried ritalin illegally bar me from getting that medication in the future?
Any specific experience with Stephanie Bourke from Blackrock Clinic?

Last question, I'm wondering do all the consultants give general cognitive assessments, or do some offer ADHD-specific? Do all of them encompass a screening for autism and IQ tests? I was told by a consultant that the person in St. Pats who assesses for ADHD has to do an overall cognitive assessment, not just ADHD, including both these things. For personal reasons I definitely don't want to know my IQ, and as an aside I'd also like to avoid knowing if I have autism or not if possible. I'm not implying there's anything wrong with autism, it's only the IQ thing that I feel feel is demeaning and I'd feel **** about even if I score above average. I'm fine thinking that I might be autistic, I'd just rather not be told where exactly I am on the autistic spectrum. Sorry for the little blog I just don't want someone to misinterpret and think I'm implying autism is something to be ashamed of.
I wouldn't mention that you've taken your brother's meds because he is breaking the law in giving them to you, not you. You should definitely make it clear that you have close relatives with ADHD, because that'll show that you know what you're talking about. And the heritability for ADHD is about 85%.

Dr. Bourke is the psych I go to myself. She is good. Others think she's not that flexible because she won't give any credence to anything that is not 100% scientifically proven (such as CBD oil) but I see that as a good thing.

I think assessing for co-occuring conditions would depend on the psych and their areas of speciality. Why not ask HADD who they'd recommend?
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30-09-2019, 12:50   #456
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Hi ttrreeww,


It's great that you are getting ready to get an assessment. Tell them about your brother, not the prescription as Lucat recommends. High correlation among families, so this is strong evidence even before assessment begins.

IQ tests are done when testing for ADHD to rule out mild general learning disabilities as the cause for reduced concentration etc. If done, your IQ results would be part of the report, but it's normally the WAIS, so the IQ breakdown is not the same as Stanford Binet (the typical IQ score you see on the telly or when referring to geniuses etc). Not everywhere does it here, and from what i can see would be more typically done with children, as it's harder to ascertain their general intelligence and rule out mgld. That's the way it was when I worked in CAMHS anyway. Pats is the only place i know that specifically does it - they have also demanded brain scans for people in the past before they will confirm ADHD diagnosis, which is not really evidence based, so that's weird. Anyway they have stopped doing assessments for this altogether for the time being. I don't know why - it is a literal cash cow.

I don't know if Stephanie Bourke does them - others on this thread will know, but i doubt it. They are unlikely to be done by a psychiatrist in this country, much more the domain of psychology.

No where will "screen" for autism if you attend for an ADHD assessment unfortunately, although an experienced clinician like myself can spot even a subtle case without doing any specific tests. You would also not be told "where you lie" on the spectrum. This is not a thing. You would be told you would qualify for a diagnosis for the following reasons e.g. restricted interests/routines as shown in fixed interest in trains etc.
If you look at the literature, and the discussions in the media, you will learn that there is a huge amount of overlap in neurodiversity - people with ADHD are likely to have another condition such as dyslexia, asd, dyspraxia, tourettes etc. About 70% of people with ADHD are likely to experience a mental health condition also. About half the people I see with ADHD have ASD also in my opinion, although only a few have that diagnosis. All that being said, I see a lot of reports, and often clinicians won't go there with the diagnosis even when they clearly make an inference to it, especially if they are not well versed in the above, or are just an ADHD "expert" (anyone who claims to be an expert in one of these conditions but failed to consider co-occurring conditions is not an expert or is a sharlatan)

By the same token, it is negligent in my opinion to fail to assess and diagnose fully for any physical and mental health conditions, and depending on the profession, a practitioner could be sued on that basis. It is important to know if you are on the spectrum also for example - ADHD medication is less effective for people who are also on the spectrum.

that being said, if you tell your prospective doctor from the get go, they may not look too hard, but I really think it's in people's interests to know as if a person is both, that offers a unique set of challenges that need to be addressed.



any questions about this, just shout, lot of experience here on this thread, and several at least with dual diagnosis









Quote:
Originally Posted by ttrreeww View Post
I'm looking to be assessed for ADHD and have a few questions.
I have used my brother's ritalin prescription in the past and my family think how it worked for me confirms I have ADHD because the same problems were alleviated. But could mentioning that I've tried ritalin illegally bar me from getting that medication in the future?
Any specific experience with Stephanie Bourke from Blackrock Clinic?

Last question, I'm wondering do all the consultants give general cognitive assessments, or do some offer ADHD-specific? Do all of them encompass a screening for autism and IQ tests? I was told by a consultant that the person in St. Pats who assesses for ADHD has to do an overall cognitive assessment, not just ADHD, including both these things. For personal reasons I definitely don't want to know my IQ, and as an aside I'd also like to avoid knowing if I have autism or not if possible. I'm not implying there's anything wrong with autism, it's only the IQ thing that I feel feel is demeaning and I'd feel **** about even if I score above average. I'm fine thinking that I might be autistic, I'd just rather not be told where exactly I am on the autistic spectrum. Sorry for the little blog I just don't want someone to misinterpret and think I'm implying autism is something to be ashamed of.

Last edited by Feu; 30-09-2019 at 13:11.
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06-11-2019, 14:34   #457
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Hi everyone
I'm just doing my regular trawl of how are people getting assessed? Who is doing it? How reliable are they? Psychiatrist or Psychologist? How long waiting?

a few of my reliable sources for assessment have dried up and I need to know if anyone has found any new Drs or psychologists they would recommend?

hope everyone is well! And of course, if you're in college, register with your disability service!
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