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10-10-2020, 20:49   #1
feargale
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Thugamar féin an Samhradh linn

I encoutered the following online:

"Thugamar Féin An Samhradh Linn is a traditional Irish tune sung on May Day (Lá Bealtaine). Edward Bunting—a 19th century music collector—said this song “is probably extremely ancient” and was sung in the Dublin area around 1633. Even so, Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin says it dates back to 1745, yet Mary Devlin (author of The Lost Music of Ireland) claims it was 1726, so the origin is rather vague."

I distinctly recall reading that when King James Ii rode through Dublin on his way to the Boyne the crowd serenaded him with this song. Can anybody confirm?
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09-12-2020, 22:10   #2
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I distinctly recall reading that when King James Ii rode through Dublin on his way to the Boyne the crowd serenaded him with this song. Can anybody confirm?
I'm afraid I can't contribute to anything about James leaving Dublin but when he arrived back post haste with his aul nag half dead he bewailed Lady Talbot "Your Countrymen M'Lady, they ran away!" To which Lady Talbot replied "I see your Majesty won the race".

That's a nice song you speak of though Sir. I often hear it in the morning on the Irish radio station.
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09-12-2020, 23:24   #3
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I'm afraid I can't contribute to anything about James leaving Dublin but when he arrived back post haste with his aul nag half dead he bewailed Lady Talbot "Your Countrymen M'Lady, they ran away!" To which Lady Talbot replied "I see your Majesty won the race".

That's a nice song you speak of though Sir. I often hear it in the morning on the Irish radio station.
And James consequently acquired the well-merited soubriquet in Irish, Séamus an cháca. The Stuarts were a curse on three kingdoms.
I read that twelve Talbot men sat down to breakfast in Malahide Castle on the morning of the Battle of the Boyne and that evening all twelve were dead.

It is indeed a nice song. I believe it has its origins in South Ulster, Cavan, Monaghan, Armagh or thereabouts.

P.S. Do you mean Raidió na Gaeltachta or Raidió na Life?
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10-12-2020, 02:08   #4
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According to Maurice Craig, when the Duke of Ormonde arrived in Dublin in 1662 as Viceroy on behalf of the recently-restored Charles II, he was greeted on landing at Sandymount by a rejoicing peasantry dancing, strewing flowers and singing Thugamar féin an samhradh linn. So that suggests it goes back to at least then. But I don't know what Craig's source was.
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10-12-2020, 02:53   #5
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P.S. Do you mean Raidió na Gaeltachta or Raidió na Life?
I think its the former Sir.

I knew 4 lads of Malahide Castle were killed didn't know 'twas 12.
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