Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
04-07-2010, 20:43   #46
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 17,645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judgement Day View Post
Where do you get them from? Typhoid Mary....I'll be having nightmares about her tonight - yuck!!
Its my tabloid mind -with a name like mary she had to be irish - I read footnotes

i am sure there is an executed policeman or gangster out there waiting to be found.
CDfm is offline  
Advertisement
04-07-2010, 20:57   #47
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 15,428
CDfm you should start looking at local papers from about a hundred years, you'd love some of the stories that they have. Also there was a history of County Sligo written in the late nineteenth century by a priest/bishop which was full of the sort of gossipy/tabloid stories you're looking for.
brianthebard is offline  
Thanks from:
04-07-2010, 21:16   #48
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 13,401
Just to be clear, what is the criteria for a persons grave to be shown here? I have a few in mind, such as Wolfe Tone....
Wolfe Tone is offline  
04-07-2010, 21:25   #49
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 13,349
Quote:
Originally Posted by MUSSOLINI View Post
Just to be clear, what is the criteria for a persons grave to be shown here? I have a few in mind, such as Wolfe Tone....
You have to be a Protestant like Wolfe Tone?
Judgement Day is offline  
04-07-2010, 21:26   #50
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 15,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by MUSSOLINI View Post
Just to be clear, what is the criteria for a persons grave to be shown here? I have a few in mind, such as Wolfe Tone....
I think the point is to talk about people who are not well remembered by history, as well as to look for the more tabloidy elements as CDfm puts it. Politics isn't out of the question but everyone already knows who Wolfe Tone is. On the topic of politicians I wonder does anyone know where Willie Redmond was buried? I'm fairly sure he was killed during WWI. Thomas Kettle too.
brianthebard is offline  
(2) thanks from:
Advertisement
04-07-2010, 21:36   #51
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 17,645
Michael John O'Leary of Inchigella won a Victoria Cross in 1915.He stormed a position and shot 8 Germans.


Quote:
"A machine gun was O’Leary’s mark. Before the Germans could manage to slew round and meet the charging men, O’Leary picked off the whole of the five of the machine gun crew. Leaving some of his mates to come up and capture the gun, he dashed forward to the second barricade, which the Germans were quitting in a hurry and shot three more.
"Some of the enemy who couldn’t get away quick enough faced our men but very little bayonet work was needed. The majority did not wait and we picked them off a good lot of them from our trenches as they left their holes.
"I had a job keeping my men in the trench. "Why can’t we go across?" they shouted at me and I wanted to go as much as they did. We soon understood how necessary it was to keep up the steady fire. We actually lost more men than the storming party.
His father Daniel was a fervent republican and was non-plussed by his sons actions, rheumatism was no excuse in West Cork at the time.

Quote:
"I am surprised he didn't do more. I often laid out twenty men myself with a stick coming from Macroom Fair, and it is a bad trial of Mick that he could kill only eight, and he having a rifle and bayonet"
and this beauty

Quote:

“Mr. O’Leary, senior, father of the famous V.C., speaking in the Inchigeela district, urged the young men to join the British army. ‘If you don’t’, he told them, ‘the Germans will come here and will do to you what the English have been doing for the last seven hundred years’.” (excerpted from Frank Gallagher's Four Glorious Years, 1953. He wrote under the pen name David Hogan.)
He finished the War as A Captain and married a Ballavourna girl and headed to Canada as a Policeman.

Canada didnt go well and he was on trial twice for helping illegal immigrants etc and returned to Ireland and onto London.

He is from the same area as Peader O'Laoighaire of Mo Sceal Fein fame so could be a relative.In World War II he became a Major. After the War he became a builder.




He died in 1961 and is buried in Paddington.
CDfm is offline  
04-07-2010, 22:16   #52
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 17,645
Quote:
Originally Posted by MUSSOLINI View Post
Just to be clear, what is the criteria for a persons grave to be shown here? I have a few in mind, such as Wolfe Tone....
There are no hard and fast criteria -but this thread is for quirky and forgotten people & the footnotes.A bit more anthropological history if you like.It was a spinoff of looking for Mr Charlotte Bronte.

I have another thread on executions here

http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showt...p?t=2055944797

Matthew Tone - Theobalds brother would be a fit as would his wife or son as would Thomas Emmet brother of Robert graves be here.

The Parkeeper in Stephens Green in 1916 -tea with Countess Markiewicz during the Rising & saved his ducks - who was he ??

The thing is that it is something that someone else will get a kick out of or it is something of interest.

I suppose its for people who may not merit a thread in their own right but as a genre do.
CDfm is offline  
Thanks from:
04-07-2010, 22:17   #53
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 13,349
George Charles Bingham aka the 3rd Earl of Lucan of the Charge of the Light Brigade fame and of the infamous Sligo/Mayo dynasty lies at peace in Laleham, Middlesex. Far from the Balaclava battlefield of 1854 where many died in the most heroic charge/cock-up in British military history which was largely the fault of Lucan and his commanding officer Lord Raglan. Still the spin doctors had a field day and managed to turn utter fiasco into a PR triumph for the Empire. Anyway another Irishman resting far from the old sod.



Birth: Apr. 16, 1800
Death: Nov. 10, 1888

British Army Officer. George Charles Bingham was born in London, the eldest son of the second Earl of Lucan and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Belasyse, the daughter of Earl Fauconberg, who had been married to and divorced from the Duke of Norfolk. Lord Bingham, as he was known until his father's death in 1839, was educated at Westminster School. When he was sixteen, a commision was bought for him in the 6th. Regiment of Foot. Within ten years, he had reached the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in command of the 17th. Lancers. In the same year (1826), he was elected to the House of Commons, representing County Mayo in Ireland, where his family were landowners; he held this seat until 1830. In 1829, he married Anne, the youngest of the seven daughters of the sixth Earl of Cardigan. They were to have two sons and four daughters. Lucan became a Colonel in 1841 and a Major-General in 1851. In February 1854, when the British Army, under the command of Lord Raglan, was about to be sent to the Crimea, he was given command of the Cavalry Divison, which had two brigades: the Heavy Brigade under James Yorke Scarlett, and the Light Brigade under the seventh Earl of Cardigan, Lucan's brother-in-law, with whom he did not enjoy a good relationship. On the 25th. October, the Russians advanced on Balaclava and captured the redoubts, which had been held by Turkish troops. The Russians were then driven back by the Charge of the Heavy Brigade, after which Lucan placed the Heavy Brigade on the slopes. He was waiting for the approach of the Infantry, when Captain Nolan brought him the message: "Lord Raglan wishes the cavalry to advance rapidly to the front. Follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. Troop of horse artillery may accompany. French cavalry is on your left. Immediate." The intention was for the attack to be on the Causeway Heights and the redoubts, but Lucan understood it, quite wrongly, to mean that the advance was to be along the North valley, at the end of which the defeated Russian cavalry was drawn up behind twelve guns, with other Russian troops on the heights at either side. Although he realised "the uselessness of such an attack, and the danger attending it", Lucan felt bound to obey, and sent the Light Brigade forward, with two regiments of the Heavy Brigade to cover its retirement. The Light Brigade was reduced from 673 to 195 men, the two Heavy regiments suffered, and Lucan was wounded in the leg. He was recalled and returned to England at the beginning of March 1855. He applied for a court-martial, which was refused, but was vindicated by the House of Lords. He had no further military employment, but was promoted to Lieutenant-General in 1858, General in 1865, and Field-Marshal in 1887. Also in 1858, he proposed the wording of the clause which enabled practising Jews, who could not take the Parliamentary Oath, to sit in the Houses of Parlaiment. In the 1968 film, "The Charge of the Light Brigade", Lord Lucan was played by Harry Andrews. The fourth and fifth Earls are buried on either side of him, along with their Countesses. The sixth Earl was a minister in the 1945-51 Labour Government, and the seventh Earl (b. 1934), who has not been seen since 1974, was found guilty in absentia of the murder of his children's nanny, Mrs. Sandra Rivett, and the attempted murder of his wife. (bio by: Iain MacFarlaine)


Burial:
All Saints Churchyard
Laleham
Surrey, England

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...r&GRid=9000836
Judgement Day is offline  
Thanks from:
04-07-2010, 22:18   #54
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 13,401
Excellent stuff. I will see what I can think of!
Wolfe Tone is offline  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
04-07-2010, 22:37   #55
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,377
Eilís Dillon

Eilís Dillon (1920–1994) was an Irish author of 50 books, translated into 15 languages.

She was born in 1920 in Galway, Ireland. Her family was involved in Irish revolutionary politics; her uncle Joseph Mary Plunkett was a signatory of the 1916 Proclamation and was executed after the Easter Rising.

She started to produce children's books, in Irish, and later in English in the 1940s, including a string of successful teenage novels, some of which (The Lost Island, The Island of Horses) were still in print 50 years later.

In the 1960s she moved to Rome. Following her husband's death in 1970 she published her most successful historical novel, Across the Bitter Sea (1973), and in 1974 married the American-based critic and professor Vivian Mercier.

Eilís Dillon died in 1994 and is buried beside her second husband in Clara, Co. Offaly; a prize in her memory is given annually as part of the Bisto Book of the Year Awards.



Uploaded with ImageShack.us
Firetrap is offline  
04-07-2010, 23:37   #56
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 17,645
ahem JD

I thought the Earl of Lucan was buried in Huy, Belgium

Patrick Sarsfield was the Jacobite Earl of Lucan

Last edited by CDfm; 04-07-2010 at 23:47.
CDfm is offline  
Thanks from:
05-07-2010, 00:38   #57
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 17,645
Oscar Wilde is Jim Morrisons neighbour at Pere LaChaise in Paris.



Proust and Chopin are buried there too.The place is fairly huge with probably 100,000 plus graves and an estimated 1 milliom burials.So it is not exclusive.

Wildes funeral has been described as "cheap".

His wife Constance, had ownership of his works and refused to give him money as long as he saw Lord Alfred Douglas. The reason for this is likely to be to prevent a civil suit by his father the Marquess of Queensbury.

She refered to him as her "misguided husband" and they never divorced and predeceased him in 1898 and is buried in Genoa.

CDfm is offline  
05-07-2010, 10:36   #58
Jabba
Registered User
 
Jabba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 2,862
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDfm View Post
...
Nice bit of info. Oscar Wildes' grave is covered in a torrent of graffiti. Stranger still is the amount of people who kiss the grave with lipstick. I dont really understand it.

The cemetary is definitely worth a visit.
Jabba is offline  
Thanks from:
05-07-2010, 13:40   #59
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 17,645
If you thought Jack Lynch was the first Lynch from Cork to run a country -ahem you havent heard of this lady Elisa Lynch




Elisa Lynch (1835-1886) was the mistress of Francisco Lopez President of Paraguay,he was ousted and killed in a Civil War/ brazillian war along with her 15 year old son.

Dying in Paris in the 1990s Paraguay claimed her body and her tomb is her at the Recoleta cementery in Asuncion - Paraguay

http://www.irlandeses.org/dilab_lynchea.htm



Now the Lynch Clan includes Che Guervara
Quote:
You might think that even George Orwell would have no cause to fret about the World Cup reigniting tensions from a war that ended 140 years ago. Au contraire. If not for its winners, the War of the Triple Alliance remains a live issue for its losers. Indeed, as recently as last November, this newspaper carried reports of an event at which Paraguay’s vice-president called on Brazil to apologise for its brutality in 1870.

That call was made, curiously, at the launch of a book by an Irishman about an Irishwoman. The former was diplomat Michael Lillis, the latter Eliza Lynch: whose dramatic life has spawned several other accounts, including one by Anne Enright. Born in Cork, Lynch left Ireland in the fateful year of 1847 and, by extraordinary twists of fate, rose to wealth and fame as de facto “Queen of Paraguay”, until the aforementioned war set her on a reverse trajectory, back to poverty.

In her lifetime, she was regarded by Paraguayan critics as a mere prostitute who had seduced the country’s leader-in-waiting while he was living in Paris and then followed him home to become the unmarried mother of his six children. She was also blamed for provoking him into the disastrous war. But history has been rather kinder to her.

The Lillis book was unveiled in her former home in Asunción, where the regard for “La Lynch”, as she was once known, is such that she is commemorated both by the mausoleum to which her remains were eventually repatriated, and by the name of a major city avenue. Her posthumous popularity does not appear to be waning either. More than 1,000 packed the house for the book launch, with more standing outside.

There are fascinating parallels between Lynch and another Eliza – Gilbert – who was among her contemporaries. Gilbert became better known to the world as the “Spanish” dancer, Lola Montez, but she was born in Limerick (or possibly Sligo). She too was famously beautiful, and also charmed her way into high places – the affections of King Ludwig I of Bavaria in particular – and a low reputation; before, also like Lynch, coming to the sad end that 19th-century morality demanded.

It might be interesting too – in an entirely different way – to compare the Queen of Paraguay with another Lynch – Che Guevara – whose grandmother came from Galway. The influence of the extended Lynch family on Latin American politics is surely worth a PhD thesis, if one hasn’t been written already. In any case, Eliza Lynch is now a national heroine in her adopted country, where her last duties included burying her husband and a teenage son – both killed in the war’s decisive battle – with her own hands.

http://www.google.ie/#q=jack+lynch%2...0c5b9049fc65b6

Last edited by CDfm; 05-07-2010 at 13:49.
CDfm is offline  
05-07-2010, 16:03   #60
oncevotedff
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianthebard View Post
On the topic of politicians I wonder does anyone know where Willie Redmond was buried?I'm fairly sure he was killed during WWI.
Loker, Belgium. He died of wounds during the battle for Messines Ridge. Not my photo but here is the headstone. Redmond was originally buried in the grounds of a convent which is now gone. The CWGC wanted to move his body into the nearby Loker CWGC but the family refused permission so his grave now stands rather oddly in the middle of a field about 50 yards away from the cemetery.



Quote:
Originally Posted by brianthebard View Post
Thomas Kettle too.
No known grave. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

http://www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_...asualty=798121

Last edited by oncevotedff; 05-07-2010 at 16:14.
oncevotedff is offline  
(3) thanks from:
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet