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16-06-2010, 23:06   #1
 
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Famous Irish Graves -They are dead but where are they buried.

I was at a funeral recently in St Fintans in Sutton and took time out to see where Phil Lynott & Charlie Haughey were buried.

I never found Charlies Grave but then he wasn't a rock star.

Here is a pic of Philip Parris Lynott's grave.



It got me thinking that before Catholic Emancipation 1830 you did not have Catholic Graveyards and the family graves I have found on my own bunch were in Protestant Cemetaries.

Great Uncle Peter was buried in a grave in use since at least 1777 by his namesake.

So dotted around Ireland you have graves of "famous" people and little bits of local history and even worldwide.Where was Patrick Sarsfield interred. James Joyce, Peig Sayers???

Oscar Wilde is a neighbour of the Lizard King himself Jim Morrison in Pere Le Chaise in Paris.

Here is a cool link to the mystery Robert Emmets final resting place.

http://homepage.eircom.net/~seanjmur...smys/emmet.htm
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17-06-2010, 10:43   #2
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Interesting thread.

Peig is buried in Dunquin on the Dingle Peninsula. I have been to her grave.

That was an interesting article about Robert Emmet.


A few weeks ago I was in Galway and went to find the grave of William Joyce, Lord Haw Haw, in the graveyard on Botharmor. I couldn't find it and there was nobody around that I could ask. I didn't want to knock on the caretakers door as it was around lunchtime on a Sunday.

Does anyone know, where in the graveyard this grave is?


D
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17-06-2010, 12:25   #3
 
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Joyce is buried in Paris isn't he? (nope, Zurich)
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17-06-2010, 13:31   #4
 
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The Strange and Bizarre tale of the reinternment of Willie Yeats
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But the end of the war brought a bizarre and unwelcome surprise. The body had disappeared. When Yeats’s last lover, Edith Shackleton Heald, returned to Roquebrune to visit the grave, she found that the grave was gone. A confused exchange of correspondence between the priest at Roquebrune, the undertaker’s office, and a small group of Yeats’s friends revealed that, apparently due to a clerical error and the priest’s ignorance of Yeats’s identity, the grave had been dug up and the poet’s remains taken to the ossuary, where anonymous bones were kept. It would be difficult to find the poet’s skeleton: in the ossuary skulls and limbs were stored separately.
So was there really another skelleton with a surgical truss ??

Here is the link

http://www.hudsonreview.com/PhillipsSp04.html

Not to be outdone on having just the one grave Peter Kavanagh, eccentric doctor and literary executor of Patrick Kavanagh had a cunning plan for two graves

Quote:
In November 1967 Patrick Kavanagh finally died and was buried in the "stony grey soil" of Inniskeen graveyard. There were stepping stones on his grave and a wooden cross with his name inscribed on it, with a few lines of one of his poems written on the stepping stones. When his wife died there was a dispute between the Kavanaghs and the wife's people which resulted in Peter removing the stepping stones and the cross, and arranging them near the gate of their original home.
http://www.redbrick.dcu.ie/~scruff/kavanagh.htm

So you have the real grave and one that looks like one.

Last edited by CDfm; 17-06-2010 at 13:44. Reason: To give the poets equal billing
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17-06-2010, 13:40   #5
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Interesting thread.

Peig is buried in Dunquin on the Dingle Peninsula. I have been to her grave.

That was an interesting article about Robert Emmet.


A few weeks ago I was in Galway and went to find the grave of William Joyce, Lord Haw Haw, in the graveyard on Botharmor. I couldn't find it and there was nobody around that I could ask. I didn't want to knock on the caretakers door as it was around lunchtime on a Sunday.

Does anyone know, where in the graveyard this grave is?


D
easy to find it.
the problem with that is that if everybody know some crazed anti fa will desecrate it. behind the KLm graves.


look out for the grave of Padraig O conaire and walter Macken. siobhan mcKenna?
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17-06-2010, 13:59   #6
 
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A few weeks ago I was in Galway and went to find the grave of William Joyce, Lord Haw Haw, in the graveyard on Botharmor. I couldn't find it and there was nobody around that I could ask. I didn't want to knock on the caretakers door as it was around lunchtime on a Sunday.

Does anyone know, where in the graveyard this grave is?


D
I havent been there but I read somewhere that he was buried in the Protestant Section of the New Graveyard -if that makes any sense.

His daughter gave away some of the family papers to a collector as she couldnt afford a headstone.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2...secondworldwar
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17-06-2010, 14:16   #7
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easy to find it.
the problem with that is that if everybody know some crazed anti fa will desecrate it. behind the KLm graves.


look out for the grave of Padraig O conaire and walter Macken. siobhan mcKenna?
Thank you. I'll be in Galway again in August and will go again. So Joyce is literally behind the KLM graves?

I'm glad you mentioned O'Conaire, Macken and McKenna. I never knew they were buried there too. I have always enjoyed Mackens triology.


Thank you.
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17-06-2010, 19:47   #8
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Where was Patrick Sarsfield interred.
St Martin's hurchyard, Huy, Belgium. He died of wounds after the Battle of Landen in 1693.

Coincidentally I stopped in Littleton, Co. Tipperary on the way home today to look for the grave of Gen. Richard Mulcahy. I'll take a pic next week.


Grave of Sean Treacy, Kilfeacle, Co. Tipperary


Grave of George Plant, St. Johnstown, Co. Tipperary

I should have Dan Breen around somewhere too.
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18-06-2010, 00:16   #9
 
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George Plant is an interesting one as he was known as the IRA Executioner and effectivelly tried twice for the same crime. He also was a Protestant & his background was not too disimilar to Patrick Kavanaghs.

An objective mini bio is here

http://www.turtlebunbury.com/history...orgeplant.html

Now I didnt really mean this thread to be Find A Grave for Republicans but local angles are good.
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18-06-2010, 17:17   #10
 
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There's one of the footballers who died in the Munich Air Disaster buried in Glasnevin Cemetery.

Liam Whelan. I have some pictures of it somewhere.
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18-06-2010, 17:32   #11
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Most of the famous people are buried in Glasnevin Cemetery: Daniel O'Connell, C.S. Parnell, Éamon de Valera, Michael Collins, Brendan Behan, Maud Gonne. Guided tours are organised for the cemetery.

Peig Sayers's graveyard has one of the best views in Ireland.
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18-06-2010, 23:08   #12
 
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Mr Protestant Porter A/K/A Arthur Guinness is in Oughter Ard Co Kildare while the rest of the family are in a tomb in the more salubrious Mount Jerome



His grave has recently been rediscovered
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HERE lies the best known Irishman in history .... in a grave hardly anyone knows about and even less visit.
Stout king Arthur Guinness was buried almost 200 years ago after leaving behind the famous recipe for the pint that would carry his name - and the name of Ireland - across the world.
But today only a handful of local folk in Co Kildare know where to find him.
And as for the modern day multi-national brewers, they don't seem to care.
There are no signposts, no maps to his grave and even in the nearby town of Naas, few know where he lies.
In terms of tourism, it could be one of the most shameful oversights in Irish history.
"I was told that the last time the Guinness family were over from England, they didn't know where it was," says Johnny Dunne, who lives just yards from the graveyard.
"There wouldn't really be any tourists. People still get buried up there, but it's only local people with the plots up there who you find doing that."
The beautiful resting place, which dates from the sixth century, is like the recipe for the famous big pint, one of the best kept secrets in Ireland.
Even the Guinness brewery in St James's Gate, Dublin, were stuck for an answer and had to call on its archivist to help us track the location down.
Graveyard caretaker Sean Meaney said the cemetery had been disused altogether in the past but that he and some friends decided to clean it up.
"My parents are buried up there," he said. "A group of us lads decided to form a committee and do some work on it.
"This was when it was just a wilderness about 15 years ago. No one was interested in it at all.
"I had to beat a track into it when I wanted to get up there.
"Nowadays you get school tours going up to see it because it's historic. There are supposed to have been nuns buried in it at one stage."
Sean said he knew that the Guinness angle was not drawn on by Irish tourist bosses.
But he would be wary of visitors trampling on the ancient ground.
"The trouble is that you might get the wrong elements knowing about it," he said.
"There was talk there of putting a sign up at one stage, but that hasn't happened."
Oughterard Cemetery, just a few miles outside of Naas, sits atop a hill overlooking spectacular Kildare countryside.
It holds the souls of both Protestants and Catholics and only those with a direct connection can be buried in it.
Its popularity as a beautiful resting place has been rekindled since its makeover, and it's said that local farmers have offered to donate land to extend it.
But the walled property that boasts a round tower and tumbledown crypt is unlikely ever to be reshaped.
Today it has a gate indicating to passers by that it is a sacred place.
But only by accident would visitors realise they were on the same ground as the King of Stout.
Arthur Guinness, who shares a vault with his wife Olivia, children and grandchildren, is thought to have been born nearby in Selbridge.
He was a butler for a landed family, and began experimenting with brewing techniques in his own home.
His projects with 'porter,' a dark beer that had its roots in the east end of London, brought him a brand new flavour and he was brewing stout at St James's Gate soon after.
The brewery there today is one of Ireland's biggest tourist attractions with people from across the world queuing in their thousands to hear about the beer.
But the whereabouts of the man himself, who lies less than 20 miles from Dublin, is not part of the show.
Local farmer, teetotaller Johnny Dunne said: "It's hard to say if there are people going up there to see his grave or not. You wouldn't notice people driving by."
Stout fans who fancy paying their respects to the man himself might enjoy a pilgrimage to the lonely graveside.
They might take heart from the carved words on the tomb of Arthur, who died at 78, and his wife.
The grave reads: "They lived universally beloved and respected and their memory will long be cherished by a numerous circle of friends, relations and descendants."
Millions of people would agree.
A spokeswoman for Guinness Ireland said the grave was 'private'.
She added the entire history of the company was on open display at the Dublin brewery.
"We have half a million visitors a year," she said.
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18-06-2010, 23:19   #13
 
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Originally Posted by DubMedic View Post
There's one of the footballers who died in the Munich Air Disaster buried in Glasnevin Cemetery.

Liam Whelan. I have some pictures of it somewhere.
a forgotten hero -now thats interesting -was he from the area
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19-06-2010, 22:07   #14
 
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a forgotten hero -now thats interesting -was he from the area
Not sure about Liam, but from what I've been told his mother is/was a local resident.
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19-06-2010, 22:41   #15
 
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Not sure about Liam, but from what I've been told his mother is/was a local resident.
He was from Cabra -there is some stuff on You Tube about the Busby Babes and Boby Charlton at Home Farm but this is the video I like

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