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19-04-2010, 21:35   #16
christramp
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Huge range on prices

Hi,
There are loads of options out there but you gotta know what you want and what suits you, I know too many lads that have bought what they think they want because of looks, brand or because others have them - these same lads have all changed their boats twice since then. If you are buying second hand aim more towards the € 500 mark and new € 800 + mark. again this depends on what you are looking to do but these price range will afford you more choice and better condition / quality boat. Best to make an investment that will last for a bit.
One main thing - Always Demo Demo Demo
Cheers
Chris
kayakhut.com
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23-06-2010, 14:03   #17
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Hey guys,

Im currently "in between outdoor activities" and like the idea of kayaking. Went to oysterhaven near Kinsale years ago and LOVED the kayaking bit.

Im from west cork, about 20 mins from the nearest beach.

Where should I start to get into this?

Does anyone know if theres a club in west cork that does rivers?
or whatever like just wanna see if its for me and go from there

cheers.........
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29-06-2010, 13:31   #18
irishlostboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by christramp View Post
....If you are buying second hand aim more towards the € 500 mark ..
there are plenty of less scruplous paddlers who realise that with the growing popularity of kayaking, they can buy a boat, paddle the arse off it for a year, then flog it for nearly new numbers. traders are increasingly being involved in the second hand market. back in the day it was mainly trade-ins, but now there are traders who buy up the deals on the second hand market and gain good returns on the sale. nothing wrong with that of course, just be aware it is happening.
buying second hand there is NO WARRANTY on the boat. when you buy new, the manufacturer usually offers a warranty on the boat for 1-5 years (depends on manufacturer) to the original owner only.
when you buy second hand you do not know the history of the boat. of course the owner will tell you he only took it on flat water and wrapped it in bubble wrap and only used organic shampoo on it once a week etc. he will never tell you about that one catastrophic hit the hull took on a big round rock which nearly turned the hull inside out. he then kicked the dent out, used the heat hun a bit, and it LOOKS as good as new.
so, is a boat with an unknown history and no warranty worth a mere 200 euro off? your choice. from my experience i would just keep an eye out for a good deal and go for it. i got a dagger CFS in good condition for 300 quid recently. this would be more than good enough for any beginner-intermediate paddler.

when buying second hand boat, remember to look for surface deformations above scratches. any indication that the hull has been oilcanned and pushed straght. ditto on the nose. this stuff is far worse than scratching.
also, remember to question WHY the person is selling the boat? if it is an old boat, they may just want to trade up to a new model. if it is a newer model either they dont like the boat, they have damaged it and want to shift it on to a sucker, or they are jumping onto the band wagon of "trade in your boat every year and flog the old one for a mere 200 euro loss". good racket. who wouldn't want to rent a brand new boat for 200 euro a year?
also, no offence to chris, just good sense, always question the logic of a person who runs a business selling kayaks telling you you really should pay more for your first boat. most of what chris says is good sense, but he is of course not going to agree with anything that wont help keep the ol food on his table. i wouldn't.
for me anyway, 500 euro is too much to spend on any second hand boat with the exception of a jackson crosslink boat or similar. i.e. a +1000 euro boat that has not had a newer model released by same company. so far i have hunted down boats for our club members when they want their own boat and never gone over the 350 euro mark. everyone is happy with their boats.
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30-06-2010, 00:03   #19
christramp
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2

As I said before it all depends on what you are looking to do. I have looked around also for boats for club members and others and so far I have found most reasonable boats to sit in around the 500 euro mark - Pyranha burns, Liquid logic hoss etc - brand new these boats sit just below the 1000 euro mark. These are boats along with the dagger CFS I would recommend to start out with because of the volume to make paddling more stable and rescues easier. The average choice of Dagger GTs etc are too low volume and people quickly tire of these boats and move on. I have came across boats in the 300 euro mark but these have been typically older and poorer condition boats. IMO!
I have to say in the paddling community I have not came across nor have I ever heard of anyone being stung with a dope boat. Ive bought boats that have been repaired but the sellers were 100% up frount about it. I have to agree with Irishlostboy though check boats all over. run your hand up along the entire inside of a boat and if you can - take footrests & airbags out to check for stress areas - typically white lines where deformations would have been. Also try and see under the seat / centre piller if you can, also check the hull for slight creases this may show you the direction to look at.
Im not going to say much about the business that I am involved in apart from the fact that our reputation is the most important factor to us and we are primarily set up because of a passion for the sport. we will always advise on best choices and value for money and that is why we continually seek new brands bringing value and quality.
I hope you find what you are looking for, as I mentioned before demo demo demo and think where you want to be in 6 months and buy a boat that suits you now and then.
Chris
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30-06-2010, 18:32   #20
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i totally agree that the GT type boats that a lot of stores will advise on a cutomer are not a sound investment as yes, most users will trade up to a more specific boat, playboat or creeker (or even god forbid a flatwater cruiser or sea kayak ) , within a year or two and their resale value is low.
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01-07-2010, 11:37   #21
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To disagree slightly, while the GTs do have all the flaws outlined above that does not mean they are a bad boat. They do have a bit of everything in them, so as a beginner buying a GT means that you can go to a playspot and do something, go surfing and do something, or go run pretty much any river in Ireland (assuming you paddling skills are good enough).

Yes, If after a year or two you decide that trikey-woos and Helixes are what you want to do, than you will need a playboat, of you are hucking big ones and planing your annual trip to Norway, than you need a creeker. But most beginners don't know what they are planing on doing in the future, than a boat like a GT can be a good thing.

It's tail will catch, it will catch edges, but that encourages you to paddle well, if you buy say a CFS or Nomad, you will be able to paddle intermediate rivers easier, but when you step it up to harder ones you will get caught out with with your edges- which is better, doing your learning about edges in a relativity safe environment where a capsize or swim is easy to deal with and unlikely to do any harm, or realising for the first time that your ocean going cruiser has edges on the Dargle, Flesk or when you go foreign to where the water has much more power and speed?
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01-07-2010, 13:32   #22
joey100
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I would have to disagree about the views on the gt boat as a beginner boat.

When a beginner starts out they don't know if they will do whitewater, surf, playboating or sea kayaking. Something like a gt means that they can do a bit of all of these. Gives beginners a chance to try different elements of the sport before deciding on a boat that would suit them.

As KenHy said their tails will catch and their rails may catch and but this just teaches them proper boat control and shows them the consequences of edging the wrong way.

I have been teaching paddling for over 10 years now and paddling approx 16-17 years, for me beginners learning in creek boats is too easy. They get away with too much, strokes don't have to be great and edging doesn't have to be great and they wont capsize. For me beginners learn better in a gt or boat that doesn't let them away with bad technique.

I also belive that their is no need for a creek boat on the anamoe, boyne, liffey or inny which are the rivers most beginners paddle around the Dublin area. A creek boat on these rivers is over kill. Beginners will not progress as fast paddling one of these boats compared to a gt or the like.

My 2 cent's anyway.
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01-07-2010, 16:10   #23
irishlostboy
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yup. creekers are overkill for anything a beginner will be doing. so stick em in playboats. i would tell people to paddle your club boats until you have an idea of what you wanna do. and try out lots of peoples boats. just dont fork out loads of money for something you may not like in a year's time. personally i think getting your own paddle should come before your own boat. i dont mind paddling different boats, but i hate anyone else's paddle.
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07-07-2010, 12:49   #24
 
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Look after your head

I'd say get a forgiving boat with no much edge, and buy the best helmet you can afford.

I have a sweet Rocker full cut, which if you'll fogive the pun is sweet - only problem seems to be when practsising rolling ear pieces hold water for a while whch is kinda weird.

Everything else get 2nd hand until you can afford better.

Sam.

Last edited by SamB64; 07-07-2010 at 12:49. Reason: typo and missed a bit
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07-07-2010, 14:31   #25
ec18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irishlostboy View Post
yup. creekers are overkill for anything a beginner will be doing. so stick em in playboats. i would tell people to paddle your club boats until you have an idea of what you wanna do. and try out lots of peoples boats. just dont fork out loads of money for something you may not like in a year's time. personally i think getting your own paddle should come before your own boat. i dont mind paddling different boats, but i hate anyone else's paddle.
I agree going down grade II/flatwater a creeker really is overkill. The smaller river running playboat type is what i'd recommend. And yes paddle before boat
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07-07-2010, 20:11   #26
 
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cost of a kayak

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Originally Posted by A_Border_Bandit View Post
I don't know if I'm going off topic or not, but how much would a basic kayak be?
a sit on top would be a good boat to start off with and for €320 i could get you a brand new single sit on top.dmcc1987@gmail.com
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07-07-2010, 21:33   #27
 
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dmcc1987^^^

Don't put an email address up on boards unless you want a heap of spam, you can get someone to PM you if they need to contact you.
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08-07-2010, 17:03   #28
/V\etalfish
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So from reading through this thread it seems that a good beginner kayak to get would be the Dagger GT?

I'm very interested in buying a kayak but when it comes down to the details, I really have no idea.

I'd need something that would suit lake and river paddling (no white water).
I live in O'briens Bridge in Clare, so I have easy access to the Shannon.

Any ideas where the best place to buy is and what is a good price for the above kayak?
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08-07-2010, 17:41   #29
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by /V\etalfish View Post
So from reading through this thread it seems that a good beginner kayak to get would be the Dagger GT?

I'm very interested in buying a kayak but when it comes down to the details, I really have no idea.

I'd need something that would suit lake and river paddling (no white water).
I live in O'briens Bridge in Clare, so I have easy access to the Shannon.

Any ideas where the best place to buy is and what is a good price for the above kayak?
that boat will set u back around €700 you would probaly pick one up at either i-canoe in dublin or munster dive and canoe in cork but if your not planning on taking it on white water then its alot of money to spend for what your looking to use it for a sit on top would suit what your looking for you would pick one up for €320 at staroutdoors kenmare and a paddle for €45.
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09-07-2010, 18:56   #30
K_TRICKS
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any advice on life jackets, quality, brands, prices etc
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