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06-06-2019, 14:22   #16
Hedgehoggy
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Just wondering how you've been feeling mentally in these races. I think sometimes when you're starting out you don't know what to expect so you're not held back by any fears. Maybe you've been putting too much pressure on yourself during races??
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07-06-2019, 21:27   #17
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For most of us though it goes in the other direction. More experience, more running, more training adaptation - long period of sometimes dramatic improvement for 6 or 7 years before the inevitable plateau. If youre going backwards from a good start there’s something badly wrong. In this case already identified - running too hard on easy and long runs.
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07-06-2019, 22:29   #18
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Would defo recommend Pfitzinger (and Douglas) book.

Been following their up to 90km plans for last two marathons and my Pb went from 3:29 to 3:17 to 3:09.

Will be following their up to 115 plan for my next marathon.
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07-06-2019, 22:49   #19
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First step is always medical. Get all blood tests done, I agree with the lads on the paces and you should definitely heed their advice and in still it into your training but something still smells off to me here beyond training and I think getting some blood tests done wouldn't hurt either.
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08-06-2019, 18:04   #20
rom
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Originally Posted by Fusitive View Post
First step is always medical. Get all blood tests done, I agree with the lads on the paces and you should definitely heed their advice and in still it into your training but something still smells off to me here beyond training and I think getting some blood tests done wouldn't hurt either.
Sorry but applying Occam's razor to this OP is training too fast. Have been in the exact same place as them training a lot. Ran a 5k 6 months apart 23:10 both times. Very frustrating. Then trained correctly and ran 19:10 a year later. Run much faster since. I do find only 1 of of 10 people hear the advise to train their easy runs slower and take that advise.

Think of it this way. If you were studying to become a certain profession and someone who had years of experience, came from the exact same spot you were in and achieved what you wanted gave you advise why would you ignore it. It would be madness but somehow in running (as this same question is asked a lot) do people ignore it so often ? This is not targeted at the OP but people in general.

You even have elites making the same mistakes.

https://www.letsrun.com/news/2006/09...ed-in-college/

"The point is now I don’t really care about the pace. I’m not trying to run “slow” by any means, but I have no concerns that I am going too slow."

"THE GOAL OF EVERY INTERVAL OR EVERY WORKOUT IS NOT TO RUN AS FAST AS YOU CAN."
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08-06-2019, 18:58   #21
Fusitive
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Sorry but applying Occam's razor to this OP is training too fast. Have been in the exact same place as them training a lot. Ran a 5k 6 months apart 23:10 both times. Very frustrating. Then trained correctly and ran 19:10 a year later. Run much faster since. I do find only 1 of of 10 people hear the advise to train their easy runs slower and take that advise.

Think of it this way. If you were studying to become a certain profession and someone who had years of experience, came from the exact same spot you were in and achieved what you wanted gave you advise why would you ignore it. It would be madness but somehow in running (as this same question is asked a lot) do people ignore it so often ? This is not targeted at the OP but people in general.

You even have elites making the same mistakes.

https://www.letsrun.com/news/2006/09...ed-in-college/

"The point is now I don’t really care about the pace. I’m not trying to run “slow” by any means, but I have no concerns that I am going too slow."

"THE GOAL OF EVERY INTERVAL OR EVERY WORKOUT IS NOT TO RUN AS FAST AS YOU CAN."
I'm confused what you are disagreeing with. I said to take the advice of everyone else here on paces but I said to get blood tests too to check it out as something could be wrong there and the totality of the problem being 100% down to pace doesn't make sense either for me.

It's possible that two things can be combining. Could you explain what the harm is in taking both the pace and blood test advice is?

A blood test takes a couple of days to get results and can quickly confirm/deny a medical issue like low iron or thyroid and stuff like that which would be common in women who have been training at high intensity. A change in approach like the earlier advice which is also needed will indeed help a lot but might not fully uncover a medical issue if that is also present.

So while you're occams razor analogy may turn out true, being able to confirm or write off two possible issues early is much more efficient which is much better than lobbing all your money in one basket and seeing what happens.
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08-06-2019, 19:11   #22
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It’s a good observation, E, but I think the thrust of the post was that medical - while a possibility- is not usually the first port of call on such a common and easily explained issue. But certainly no harm!
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08-06-2019, 19:18   #23
Fusitive
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It’s a good observation, E, but I think the thrust of the post was that medical - while a possibility- is not usually the first port of call on such a common and easily explained issue. But certainly no harm!
It's always the first port of call in my opinion as it is so easily confirmed or denied(literally days). I think we all agree on the pace and that it needs to be dialled back substantially either way to improve. There's just something that doesn't feel right instinctally here to me as well though, I could be talking pure baloney and imagining things but I think it would be worthwhile to get the bloods done just to see as well as taking on the training advice offered earlier.
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