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12-01-2021, 11:04   #16
Testacalda
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I am considering a diesel/ kerosene heater, but not sure on its running costs
I have a 50,000 BTU Diesel heater, Running it on Kero bought from the pump at 76c per litre, it burns 0.9 litres per hour, so not that costly really.

I only use it a few hours at a time to blow heat where I'm working. My garage is uninsulated also, so obviously a waste of energy trying to heat it.
Only thing is it may not be great for a woodworking workshop. Fumes from it not noticeable in my garage, but it's not for enclosed use

Can't say I was cold in there last week though. Overalls, latex gloves and a decent jacket helps a lot. The gloves make a huge difference, even though you wouldn't think it.

https://www.craigmoreonline.ie/sip-0...-heater-diesel

Last edited by Testacalda; 12-01-2021 at 11:11.
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12-01-2021, 11:58   #17
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the problem is excess moisture from the combustion as well as the fumes, the excess moisture will condense on tools etc ......
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12-01-2021, 12:02   #18
kadman
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Originally Posted by Testacalda View Post
I have a 50,000 BTU Diesel heater, Running it on Kero bought from the pump at 76c per litre, it burns 0.9 litres per hour, so not that costly really.

I only use it a few hours at a time to blow heat where I'm working. My garage is uninsulated also, so obviously a waste of energy trying to heat it.
Only thing is it may not be great for a woodworking workshop. Fumes from it not noticeable in my garage, but it's not for enclosed use

Can't say I was cold in there last week though. Overalls, latex gloves and a decent jacket helps a lot. The gloves make a huge difference, even though you wouldn't think it.

https://www.craigmoreonline.ie/sip-0...-heater-diesel
Bit surprised its not recommended for enclosed use, yet listed for garages, workshops, ect.

Are the fumes noticeable at all, or is it the carbon monoxide thats the issue for enclosed areas, Thanks,

K.
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12-01-2021, 12:21   #19
An Ri rua
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Bit surprised its not recommended for enclosed use, yet listed for garages, workshops, ect.

Are the fumes noticeable at all, or is it the carbon monoxide thats the issue for enclosed areas, Thanks,

K.

Carbon monoxide is an issue no matter what combustible is used. There is no difference, that I'm aware of between burning paraffin or kerosene in an enclosed space. Apart from the sulphurous smell from kero. Which is marginal if you add Dipetane.
Fuel burned incorrectly, eg diesel in a kero burner or vice versa, would be dangerous as the jets need to be optimised for either.

I use 2 CO detectors with my paraffin Inverter heater. One inbuilt, one portable. An inverter is direct injection evaporation so good kero gets burned optimally.

Last edited by An Ri rua; 13-01-2021 at 00:13.
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12-01-2021, 12:25   #20
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the problem is excess moisture from the combustion as well as the fumes, the excess moisture will condense on tools etc ......
Gas certainly creates moisture but I haven't found that to be so with rolf paraffin, in all of my years using it. That includes using air moisture meters and also damp meters in a caravan office. Although I used to use the paraffin heater in tandem with either electric or an Ecograte (convected dry air) so that likely nullified the moisture issue.
Do you think paraffin also can create moisture issues? Thanks.
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12-01-2021, 13:46   #21
Testacalda
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Are the fumes noticeable at all
No, you get a bit of that TVO smell on first switching it on but that's it. no issue with fumes at all. My garage is 47 x 30.
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12-01-2021, 21:32   #22
Calahonda52
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Gas certainly creates moisture but I haven't found that to be so with rolf paraffin, in all of my years using it. That includes using air moisture meters and also damp meters in a caravan office. Although I used to use the paraffin heater in tandem with either electric or an Ecograte (convected dry air) so that likely nullified the moisture issue.
Do you think paraffin also can create moisture issues? Thanks.
You cant deny the science of an exothermic reaction

Any fuel +oxygen = carbon dioxide and water in the form of water vapour
Dirty paraffin will give out SOx and NOx and if the burn is not perfect CO as well as CO2
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12-01-2021, 21:40   #23
magicbastarder
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You cant deny the science of an exothermic reaction

Any fuel +oxygen = carbon dioxide and water in the form of water vapour
not *any* fuel though? with hydrocarbons, yes, but with coal there's no H to form water.

and much less H in the likes of wood than there is in diesel.
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12-01-2021, 21:44   #24
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Indirect space heaters are available, leaves the exhaust fumes outside


https://www.crosshireservices.ie/pro...direct-heater/
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12-01-2021, 21:56   #25
kadman
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Indirect space heaters are available, leaves the exhaust fumes outside


https://www.crosshireservices.ie/pro...direct-heater/
Good, but I cant help thinking 2.7 litres an hour would be an expensive option.
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12-01-2021, 22:10   #26
gctest50
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Good, but I cant help thinking 2.7 litres an hour would be an expensive option.

That one ia about 30kW though



You should find smaller ones if you nose around




https://www.heatersuk.com/kroll-mak1...ce-heater.html
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12-01-2021, 22:16   #27
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Or you could get one of these and connect to it to an ordinary boiler :


https://www.donedeal.ie/heating-for-...olume/23842248
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12-01-2021, 23:54   #28
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Or you could get one of these and connect to it to an ordinary boiler :


https://www.donedeal.ie/heating-for-...olume/23842248


I saw them before and i think its a great bit of kit. Its an option, I could put a flue boiler on my existing workshop stove and run that from it.
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13-01-2021, 00:14   #29
An Ri rua
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You cant deny the science of an exothermic reaction

Any fuel +oxygen = carbon dioxide and water in the form of water vapour
Dirty paraffin will give out SOx and NOx and if the burn is not perfect CO as well as CO2
Far be it from me to deny the science of an exothermic reaction. We were raised not to.

Who buys or burns dirty paraffin though? I use Rolf or else kero treated with Dipetane. Combined with a secondary dry heat source, eh electric or convected wood burner, moisture was a non issue. No exothermic reactions were harmed or caused in making this statement.

Last edited by An Ri rua; 13-01-2021 at 00:18.
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13-01-2021, 05:48   #30
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I have an air to air heat pump. It’s the job, heats the place up very quickly and is efficient. Also have the option to cool if it’s one of the four days in the year it’s needed.

The units themselves aren’t hugely expensive (start around €400) but professional installation can cost three times that. It would be better if you know someone in the air conditioning trade to either do it for you or lend you the tools.
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