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08-11-2020, 14:08   #1
garymt
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MFT?

Apologies if this question has been answered previously....

Does anyone know of a CNC shop that can supply a replacement MFT- type top?

None of the UK suppliers deliver outside the country, even one based in NI.
Nothing fancy - I only really require a few accurately placed holes to support a fence and track to enable 90deg cuts.
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08-11-2020, 16:55   #2
Calahonda52
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Hva you looked at the u tubes video about making your own
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08-11-2020, 17:41   #3
garymt
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Yes - but i decided that for the price (abt 40GBP), it wasn't worth the hassle (and the potential for inaccuracy!).
But it may be the only option in the end....
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08-11-2020, 19:36   #4
glynf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garymt View Post
Apologies if this question has been answered previously....

Does anyone know of a CNC shop that can supply a replacement MFT- type top?

None of the UK suppliers deliver outside the country, even one based in NI.
Nothing fancy - I only really require a few accurately placed holes to support a fence and track to enable 90deg cuts.

Not sure where you are based, but there is a company in Walkinstown called Dublin Custom carcass that do custom kitchen carcasses. Their website mentions CNC cut parts, may be worth asking them.



I have not used them, but they were highly recommended when I was shopping about for supply only units for our kitchen.



May be well worth a look and if you do contact them let us know how you get on, I was thinking about building a MFT knock off based on 8020 extruded aluminum with a MDF top. Not keen on shelling out €500 for one
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08-11-2020, 21:10   #5
chillyspoon
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Another option is to invest in a jig, that'll give you confidence in the accuracy and the ability to produce multiple tops:

- Cheapest one I've found (and never seen before): https://www.247wood.nl/en/mft-plunge...lete-set/a3957
- Trend's one is mid-range apparently!: https://www.trenddirectuk.com/mft-jig
- The Parf Guide System is a step up in both quality and price: https://www.axminstertools.com/ie/uj...em-mkii-104779
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08-11-2020, 21:46   #6
JayZeus
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Originally Posted by chillyspoon View Post
Another option is to invest in a jig, that'll give you confidence in the accuracy and the ability to produce multiple tops:

- Cheapest one I've found (and never seen before): https://www.247wood.nl/en/mft-plunge...lete-set/a3957
- Trend's one is mid-range apparently!: https://www.trenddirectuk.com/mft-jig
- The Parf Guide System is a step up in both quality and price: https://www.axminstertools.com/ie/uj...em-mkii-104779
I'm with Chilly on this one. I have the Parf Guide II set and it's a ballbuster pricetag, but will last me forever now. I previously had someone load one of the mft slab CNC programs and run it on their machine. Total waste of money and effort, as while the machine was accurate, the finish of the routed holes was just not accurate enough to work with the 20mm dogs to give a snug fit. .1-.2mm out is too much, yet it's perfectly fine for the majority of production full sheet machines routing MDF.

Anyway, not saying the Parf system is the one to buy necessarily, but I'd just get some sort of guide and do it myself if I were you. I went with the Parf as it doesn't need me to be running a router - the drill setup was to my liking for this purpose, but one of those router templates and a suitable cutter would be fine too. Just factor in the router bit as an additional cost along with the jig.
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08-11-2020, 22:06   #7
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Something else I'll point out about the Parf Guide system is that it can be used for other things too - the system includes a couple of dogs and long rules that connect to take advantage of Pythagoras to get the angles right (pun!). I've since used the rules for all manner of whacky things, from spacing dowels in long workpieces to acting as low profile router guides, and the dogs are exactly that, a couple of perfectly accurate stainless steel dogs.

The first test piece I cut ended up as a very flexible panel sled for my tablesaw and is still in regular use: https://www.chillyspoon.com/blog/201...-in-10-minutes

Like JayZeus I'm not saying "go out and buy the Parf Guide system" because it is indeed nut clenchingly expensive but I considered it a good investment for me because I could see future uses.

In fact, I'm half-way through updating my bench and one of the steps will be a panel flush with my inner-vise face that I'll cut two rows of dog holes in - using the Parf Guide.
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09-11-2020, 18:50   #8
Calahonda52
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IT is a nut cracker price but is does what it says it will, no questions asked, every time, and as CS says, once you have it......
In any event setting up a cnc machine for a one off will not be cheap
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09-11-2020, 23:19   #9
garymt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calahonda52 View Post
IT is a nut cracker price but is does what it says it will, no questions asked, every time, and as CS says, once you have it......
In any event setting up a cnc machine for a one off will not be cheap
Thank you all for the comprehensive replies - the Parf system is a clear winner, in spite of price - my only problem is I can't see myself ever using it again (unless mft top had to be replaced).
A Festool top might even be cheaper!
I may experiment as per Keith Browns video, and see what level of accuracy is achievable........
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09-11-2020, 23:39   #10
JayZeus
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If all you need is a simple 90 degree crosscut, there are very accurate, easy to make and super affordable options such as this:

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10-11-2020, 06:12   #11
monkeynuz
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Would this do?

https://www.sautershop.com/perforate...495543?c=13440

They also do their own versions with additional hole placements.
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10-11-2020, 17:50   #12
garymt
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Thanks, everyone, for the contributions - that video from Fine Woodworking looks very interesting..........
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29-12-2020, 20:20   #13
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Hi all, thinking strongly about going the track saw route. Have a cheap rubbish table saw which I have been threatening to upgrade for a year or two now, was looking at €800ish to get a reasonably decent one.
But thinking about it recently, I don’t really have that much need for a table saw and track saw might be much more useful.
Can anyone recommend what model you use?
Is an MFT essential to get the benefit from it?
What are the essential add one that I should be calculating into the cost e.g dogs etc?
Thanks I’m advance.
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29-12-2020, 20:38   #14
JayZeus
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Do you have a specific upper limit you want to work within cost wise? If so, what is it? Will you work in one place, or does it all need to be easily and regularly portable?

I have an MFT/3 and some DIY Parf'ed tops, and a range of dogs and rails. There's a lot of overlap in capability. If you can share some of 'how' you'll want to work, I'll be happy to give some pointers.

As far as the saw goes, there's really only one that I'd give a wholehearted recommendation for and that's the Festool TS55. There are some good options at lower prices, but the TS55 really has earned and deserves the reputation it has amongst those who have used one. If it's not badly abused, I can see it being as close to a lifetime tool as any power tool can be.
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29-12-2020, 21:02   #15
the_pen_turner
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i have a ts55. its great. best tool i ever bought. saying that i also have a dewalt 54v tracksaw that gets used a lot more because its cordless and is perfect for slightly less important cuts. i will use the festool on worktops and prefinished kitchen doors etc.

i never fell in love with the mft top. i have an older festool mft 800 that is used regularly as a clamping table but not realy for cutting on with the dogs or rail attached.
i rather a rail square
i use the clamping elements and dogs a lot for holding parts
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