Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
17-01-2021, 14:28   #136
furandfeather
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 375
Hello. After many years promising myself I'm going finally going to treat my self to a lathe.
I haven't done any turning since school, along long time ago and even at that it was very limited.
So looking for it of advise as to what I'd need
Good quality middle of the road lathe
What chisels?
Good book for beginners

I'd be more interested in trying my hand at bowls etc more than longer stuff.
Thanks
furandfeather is offline  
Advertisement
17-01-2021, 15:35   #137
magicbastarder
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 35,287
do you have a budget? you could spend anywhere from €400 to €2000 on a 'hobbyist' lathe, but you'd have to budget another few hundred for a chuck and some jaws, and gouges.
lathes *will* get more expensive as the swing over the bed increases, but on some the headstock can rotate so your piece is turning clear of the bed.
magicbastarder is online now  
17-01-2021, 21:52   #138
furandfeather
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 375
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicbastarder View Post
do you have a budget? you could spend anywhere from €400 to €2000 on a 'hobbyist' lathe, but you'd have to budget another few hundred for a chuck and some jaws, and gouges.
lathes *will* get more expensive as the swing over the bed increases, but on some the headstock can rotate so your piece is turning clear of the bed.
Ah id around a grand in the head. Wouldn't want a full bells and whistles one but a decent quality lathe that I could find my feet on. Suppose what I'm asking is there anything I should steer clear off?
A chuck and jaws are bought separately from the lathe?
A good set of gouges?
furandfeather is offline  
17-01-2021, 22:24   #139
magicbastarder
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 35,287
Quote:
Originally Posted by furandfeather View Post
A chuck and jaws are bought separately from the lathe?
yep; for example, this is what i got when i got my lathe; am happy so far with it (bought two other sets of jaws since too):
https://www.thecarpentrystore.com/p/...x-16tpi/101967

unfortunately all woodturning chapters are in hibernation at the moment, which is where you'd often find people trading in lathes.
this is an example of a lathe which can (in theory) turn a bowl a foot in diameter:
https://www.thecarpentrystore.com/p/...g-lathe/105119

i say 'in theory' because unless you're starting out with a blank that's already nice and circular, your bowl will be limited to the smallest complete circumference of the wood you've mounted (if that makes sense).

i've just noticed that naas carpentry store seem to be out of stock of most lathes they have listed; perhaps that's a brexit glitch, but there are other places which sell lathes. where are you based?
magicbastarder is online now  
17-01-2021, 22:41   #140
Sparks
Moderator
 
Sparks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 38,258
I have that lathe - it can't do an exact foot in diameter
It's a lovely lathe mind, I don't have any complaints about it, but 11.5" is the maximum diameter I've managed and it was pretty evident that I was pushing it at that even though the blank was only 2" thick or so. Squeaky bum time.







Mind you, how much of the squeaking is down to that being a hot melt glue block holding the platter there at the end while I took off the tenon I'm not sure. Glue blocks. Crazy how much those things will take.



Mind you, I've got a smaller chuck than MB's, I'm using what rutlands now sell as the Precision 75 (it used to be the Xact 3) so a 3" diameter chuck. The lathe will handle a 100mm chuck, maybe even the 114s that axminster do, but they're spendy (I got two of the rutlands ones for 80 quid by buying ex-demo stock). If you're doing large stuff; go spendy. If you cheap out like I did (well, technically I sank money into having a few different kinds of jaws instead of one set with huge capacity), don't try to find the lathe's limits.
Sparks is offline  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
17-01-2021, 22:44   #141
furandfeather
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 375
.

i've just noticed that naas carpentry store seem to be out of stock of most lathes they have listed; perhaps that's a brexit glitch, but there are other places which sell lathes. where are you based?[/QUOTE]

Thanks for your replies. I'm in galway
furandfeather is offline  
18-01-2021, 00:40   #142
mayo.mick
Registered User
 
mayo.mick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,307
Quote:
Originally Posted by furandfeather View Post
.

i've just noticed that naas carpentry store seem to be out of stock of most lathes they have listed; perhaps that's a brexit glitch, but there are other places which sell lathes. where are you based?
Thanks for your replies. I'm in galway[/QUOTE]

Not sure if Caulfields on the Tuam rd still sell woodturning gear. I bought a chuck there back in 1997, many moons ago! Robert Sorby were over and had a woodturning exhibition on there. Think Tripart might do some woodturning gear. Roynanes in Limerick would be your nearest, should have a good selection there.

I deal mostly with Raitts in Stranorlar in Donegal. Very heplfull, huge variaty of everything there. You'd reallly need to call in and have a few hours looking around!
mayo.mick is offline  
Thanks from:
18-01-2021, 12:29   #143
Guru Maith Agut
Registered User
 
Guru Maith Agut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by bamayang View Post
Decided to try a live edge bowl for the first time. Probably could have picked an easier piece of wood to work with for first go.
Wasn’t sure the plan of the design until I was half way through. Thought the tea light holder might be a good look for it.
Very hard stuff to turn.

That is fu#*ing class Bamayang!!!! Perfect look for a candle holder. Fair play
Guru Maith Agut is offline  
19-01-2021, 22:34   #144
furandfeather
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 375
More soft questions. . . .

I was cutting off a few dangerous limbs of a sycamore tree today, so I said I may aswell keep a bit for my future woodturning.
Few questions

What thickness should I cut the rings?
Would I be better with rings from straightest part of the trunk (perfect concentric circles) or would it be nicer coming from near junction, where the grain is more irregular ?

If I wanted to turn a 10inch bowl would a 12 inch ring do or would I be better off getting it from a 14 or 15 inch ring?

Or are these things I just need to experiment with and find out for myself?
furandfeather is offline  
Advertisement
19-01-2021, 22:47   #145
magicbastarder
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 35,287
you want to do more than just cut it into rings; don't cut the lengths shorter than the width of the limb. i.e. if the limb is eight inches wide, cut the lengths at least eight inches long. that means that the length you cut the wood to won't be the limiting factor.

one thing that's important to note - you don't (well, very rarely) turn bowls from rings. if you were to orient a bowl in the original position it came from in the tree, it does *not* sit flat/horizontal. it's actually oriented at 90 degrees, with the bowl sitting vertically and the 'mouth' of the bowl sitting facing the centre of the trunk. the base would usually be pointing out from the bark.

but also split the cylinder of wood down the middle and remove the pith if possible; this video will explain more; even the thumbnail might explain how the bowl sits in the tree:

magicbastarder is online now  
Thanks from:
19-01-2021, 22:58   #146
furandfeather
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 375
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicbastarder View Post
you want to do more than just cut it into rings; don't cut the lengths shorter than the width of the limb. i.e. if the limb is eight inches wide, cut the lengths at least eight inches long. that means that the length you cut the wood to won't be the limiting factor.

one thing that's important to note - you don't (well, very rarely) turn bowls from rings. if you were to orient a bowl in the original position it came from in the tree, it does *not* sit flat/horizontal. it's actually oriented at 90 degrees, with the bowl sitting vertically and the 'mouth' of the bowl sitting facing the centre of the trunk. the base would usually be pointing out from the bark.

but also split the cylinder of wood down the middle and remove the pith if possible; this video will explain more; even the thumbnail might explain how the bowl sits in the tree:


Great help, thank you
furandfeather is offline  
19-01-2021, 23:15   #147
magicbastarder
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 35,287
the problem with wood generally is that it does not tend to shrink along the length of the trunk as it dries, so doesn't shrink evenly in all directions; so it changes shape as it dries. it will tend to form cracks from the centre outwards if not split in half - by splitting it as per the thumbnail above, you in a sense create a massive 'crack' in the wood before the wood starts to choose the paths of least resistance itself, which in theory will reduce the cracking considerably. and painting the ends of the logs with a sealant slows down the drying of the wood, so the stresses as it changes shape happen more slowly and are less likely to pull the wood apart.
magicbastarder is online now  
Thanks from:
18-03-2021, 22:09   #148
treehugger22
Registered User
 
treehugger22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 8
Hi,
Im a young wood turned and wang to buy a bandsaw for preparing blanks etc. And have around 700-1000 to spend would anyone recommend a bandsaw around that price range,
Thanks
treehugger22 is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet