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19-07-2020, 04:53   #61
M.T. Cranium
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It can be seen all night as it's well above the northern horizon, moving from NNW to NNE between 10:30 pm and 3:30 a.m. (roughly the interval of dark skies). There is no best time to see it, depends on your local horizon and viewing parameters. However, it may be about to fade rapidly. I'm eight hours behind your time zone and waiting for darkness to have a look (sun just set here at 9 p.m. local time). Will report back how it compares to last two views I had.

(later edit) _ Just back in from viewing, would say it has dropped in brightness by about one magnitude past two days, it's about equal to the two guide stars it just passed. At best it is borderline of 2nd and 3rd mags. Still a good sight in binoculars. If you don't have very dark rural skies plus binocs, I would say not worth your time or effort now, but try for it if you have those two things.

Last edited by M.T. Cranium; 19-07-2020 at 07:07.
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19-07-2020, 07:13   #62
oriel36
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The dual effects of experimental theorists ('climate change' for example) and celestial sphere enthusiasts (descriptions of the comet without solar system context) are a product of Royal Society empiricism which unfortunately dominates this era.

The 17th century experimental method is like a virus which hijacked the machinery of astronomy and re-directed astronomical predictions towards experimental predictions as universal theories. It used the late 17th century equatorial coordinate system (RA/Dec) to make astronomical observations subservient to timekeeping or what became the 'clockwork solar system' of Newton thereby turning interpretation of the motions of the planet and the structure of the solar system on its head.

Whereas the geocentric astronomers and the original heliocentric astronomers could predict astronomical events as dates within the calendar system, the RA/Dec system allowed observers to predict events using the 24 hour clock within those dates. The trade-off was that more accurate predictions meant a loss of cause and effect that is more drastic than geocentricity, after all, those venerable astronomers distinguished between the direct motion of the Sun through the background field of stars while the planets wandered while RA/Dec also puts the Sun in a wandering motion -

https://community.dur.ac.uk/john.luc...n_ecliptic.gif

https://community.dur.ac.uk/john.luc...solar_year.gif


Our era is trapped within a conundrum created by two groups with a definite beginning in late 17th century England. Because academic society is dominated by these empirical descriptions, the stranglehold looks unbreakable, however, a glimpse of something new and exciting permits the perceptive or intuitive side of humanity to escape the intellectual gridlock created by people who organised things to suit themselves.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AEluR-CBu4&t=39s

The comet just reminds people of what astronomy and Earth sciences used to be with the connection between the motions of the planet and Earth sciences still in its infancy.
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19-07-2020, 08:33   #63
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Was much fainter than last week despite this being the optimal few days.
Woke my, son up after him moaning last week that I hadn't.
He was unimpressed and couldn't see it. Went back to bed
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19-07-2020, 09:19   #64
Calibos
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Dublin SkyGlow and clouds ruining things for me in Bray.

Thankfully I’ll always have 97’s Hale-Bopp being in my mid 40’s as I am. Where did 23 years go!!
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19-07-2020, 10:06   #65
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I was happy enough that I’d see it before closest approach on the 23rd but ye are all saying it’s getting dimmer.

Why would that be? Is it because it’s moving away from the sun?
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19-07-2020, 12:02   #66
Oneiric 3
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Completely clear in Sligo now but cant see it. Off to bed.
Perfect sky here last night for viewing and no sign of it either despite looking in all the right directions, even with binocs.
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19-07-2020, 12:03   #67
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I'm glad to see I wasn't the only one who couldn't see it. Went outside at 1 am and had a perfect sky to see it. Not a sign of it.
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19-07-2020, 12:25   #68
riffmongous
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Originally Posted by M.T. Cranium View Post
It can be seen all night as it's well above the northern horizon, moving from NNW to NNE between 10:30 pm and 3:30 a.m. (roughly the interval of dark skies). There is no best time to see it, depends on your local horizon and viewing parameters. However, it may be about to fade rapidly. I'm eight hours behind your time zone and waiting for darkness to have a look (sun just set here at 9 p.m. local time). Will report back how it compares to last two views I had.

(later edit) _ Just back in from viewing, would say it has dropped in brightness by about one magnitude past two days, it's about equal to the two guide stars it just passed. At best it is borderline of 2nd and 3rd mags. Still a good sight in binoculars. If you don't have very dark rural skies plus binocs, I would say not worth your time or effort now, but try for it if you have those two things.
I'll probably give it a miss then, definitely don't have dark rural skies here anyway so I'd say even the binocs won't help at those magnitudes
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19-07-2020, 12:26   #69
riffmongous
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Dublin SkyGlow and clouds ruining things for me in Bray.

Thankfully I’ll always have 97’s Hale-Bopp being in my mid 40’s as I am. Where did 23 years go!!
That was really something wasn't it, I can still remember it well too
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19-07-2020, 15:28   #70
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Dublin SkyGlow and clouds ruining things for me in Bray.

Thankfully I’ll always have 97’s Hale-Bopp being in my mid 40’s as I am. Where did 23 years go!!
Set the dairy for Fri 13th April 2029 (T- 3,206 earth days) for the wormwood-esq 'Lordy of Chaos' to arrive, it'll look like a moving gradually brightening star as it approaches.

Back in 2004 during its time of infamy as an asteroid that might strike Earth, Apophis set the record for the highest rating on the NEO Torino scale, reaching level 4 threat by the end of that year.
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19-07-2020, 22:46   #71
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Too early or anyone spotted it this evening yet? Contemplating a spin (north Wicklow) but won't bother my arse if it's tough to spot without binoculars by now?
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19-07-2020, 23:15   #72
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What time are you guys seeing it at?
I only got a chance to look for it at 1.45 am and it was faint but easily noticeable with the najed eye but i was in a rural area with no light polution.
I took the pic i posted at 3am and could barely notice it with the naked eye, definitely had dimmed a good bit since last Saturday night.
Best time would be between 12 and 2am.
If theres any lighr pollution where you are I'd forget about it as it will likely be a bit dimmer again tonight.
Use the Plough/Saucepan as a guide.
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19-07-2020, 23:24   #73
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Too early or anyone spotted it this evening yet? Contemplating a spin (north Wicklow) but won't bother my arse if it's tough to spot without binoculars by now?
I was in Fanore last night, perfect view of the northwest sky in a dark sky region, still couldn’t see it till about Half 12 due to the twilight glow

Was lovely to see with the naked eye but definitely bring binoculars to see it in more detail
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19-07-2020, 23:29   #74
lolie
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Too early or anyone spotted it this evening yet? Contemplating a spin (north Wicklow) but won't bother my arse if it's tough to spot without binoculars by now?
I just went out a few mins ago and spotted it, only for i knew exactly where to look.
If you get a spot with no light pollution go for it.
That or look out again in 6,800 years.
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19-07-2020, 23:55   #75
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Visible to the naked eye here now

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