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22-11-2020, 20:21   #1
Vizzy
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Recommend a Table saw for €300 or less

i am in the market for a table saw and could stretch to €300, at a push.

Given that Black Friday is coming up, are there any out there that people would reccommend ?

Thanks.
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24-11-2020, 07:24   #2
Calahonda52
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rather than focus on the mula, whats the application?
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24-11-2020, 09:56   #3
Vizzy
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I'm looking for something for hobby DIY. Nothing too fancy.

Adjustable blade, good fence and powerful enough for cutting ply sheets.

I am looking at this https://mtsdirect.ie/product/sip-10-table-saw/

Any thoughts ?
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24-11-2020, 10:24   #4
Calahonda52
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a dangerous toy as presented
.
look on this site and u tube where guys have built a basic saw like this into a bench so as it can be used to cut sheets of ply SAFELY, or maybe just less dangerously
ditch the legs and the side tables

also upgrade the blade to have more teeth if doing ply
for ply consider a track saw
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24-11-2020, 14:14   #5
boomdocker
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^^^
good advice there
I have a fairly average Einhell saw - this one https://www.einhell.co.uk/shop/en-uk...-2025-1-u.html

But lucky for me - I bought it second hand and the guy I bought it off did a fantastic job building it into a larger table on castors (also made a fence and crosscut sled) - so has transformed what is probably a very ordinary saw into something quite decent
So I'd echo what the previous poster says and if you are going to buy a cheapish saw with a small table, build it into a bigger table
+1 for the saw blades as well

As for sheets of ply - good and all as my setup is ( I could cut sheets of ply on it) much prefer to use the skil saw
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24-11-2020, 14:59   #6
kadman
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If plywood sheets is the criteria, a plunge saw is the tool.
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25-11-2020, 13:05   #7
GaryCocs
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Looking to build my parkside into a workbench myself (old dining room table). Replace the fence of the parkside cause it's awful.

What is the norm for building it in?

Some t -track to the left and right? What about the fence?
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25-11-2020, 13:34   #8
listermint
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vizzy View Post
I'm looking for something for hobby DIY. Nothing too fancy.

Adjustable blade, good fence and powerful enough for cutting ply sheets.

I am looking at this https://mtsdirect.ie/product/sip-10-table-saw/

Any thoughts ?
Plysheets ripping - always a tracksaw, Use one with a sheet of 8x4 insulation underneath it and you wont go wrong ever.

Repeatable smaller pieces e.g sheets 500mmx500mm that need to be cut down yes probably a table saw is best. But they are the worse thing in the world for someone solo, with limited space due to size of the sheets, maneuverability,effort and danger.
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26-11-2020, 13:35   #9
chillyspoon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryCocs View Post
Looking to build my parkside into a workbench myself (old dining room table). Replace the fence of the parkside cause it's awful.

What is the norm for building it in?

Some t -track to the left and right? What about the fence?
I don't think you'd really need the t-track assuming that it's a saw that has mitre slots already. Although you will want to route outfeed slots in line with the mitre slots into the top of your bench if you need to allow sled / mitre gauge travel beyond the end of the cut. A large cross cut sled or panel sled are the two big use cases there.
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26-11-2020, 13:44   #10
GaryCocs
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Well the t-track is moreso for the rest of the table (chop saw down one side, could use the same t-track for a measuring block.

I'm thinking of a large sheet of ply cutting down to 1m strips. (obviously a tracksaw is better for that but $$$$)
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27-11-2020, 08:52   #11
monkeynuz
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Originally Posted by GaryCocs View Post
Well the t-track is moreso for the rest of the table (chop saw down one side, could use the same t-track for a measuring block.

I'm thinking of a large sheet of ply cutting down to 1m strips. (obviously a tracksaw is better for that but $$$$)
Check out Peter Millard on YouTube he does a comparison of festool and cheap tracksaw, you might be able to get a screw fix one for around your budget with the track, although it would mean using screw fix unfortunately!
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28-11-2020, 17:37   #12
Calahonda52
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Check out Peter Millard on YouTube he does a comparison of festool and cheap tracksaw, you might be able to get a screw fix one for around your budget with the track, although it would mean using screw fix unfortunately!
IIRC the main differences are around dust collection, functionality, tool safety and the quality of the build.
The dust collection when working with mdf is critical
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28-11-2020, 17:45   #13
monkeynuz
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IIRC the main differences are around dust collection, functionality, tool safety and the quality of the build.
The dust collection when working with mdf is critical
Yes, but most “cheap” tablesaws will be worse, also why not wear a face mask until you have a decent extractor.

The differences around build quality etc. Are pretty obvious as they’re not even in adjacent ball parks price wise.
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28-11-2020, 17:46   #14
monkeynuz
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Yes, but most “cheap” tablesaws will be worse, also why not wear a face mask until you have a decent extractor.

The differences around build quality etc. Are pretty obvious as they’re not even in adjacent ball parks price wise.
I should add that if I’m ever in the market for a tracksaw I’ll be buying festool, and if I couldn’t afford one, I’d either wait or not bother.
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06-12-2020, 01:24   #15
jimmycrackcorm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryCocs View Post
Looking to build my parkside into a workbench myself (old dining room table). Replace the fence of the parkside cause it's awful.

What is the norm for building it in?

Some t -track to the left and right? What about the fence?
I bought a parkside also as my first saw and the fence is beyond awful. I don't know how they can sell these with a fence that cannot keep straight. I ended up just using a long piece of wood clamped to keep my cuts straight. But I will probably make one and drill it into the existing fence with a right-angled stop at the end to kee it straight.
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