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19-01-2021, 10:35   #106
SouthWesterly
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Lifted the mashua at the weekend and put aside 20 to plant next year. Cooked a big go of them for dinner Saturday night: they tasted absolutely horrible so I am going to put the rest of them aside to plant next year (for the leaves and flowers which are both nice to look at) and give tubers to friends/family.

Only had a few oca so put them aside for next year.

I leave the Jerusalem Artichokes in the ground and harvest them as I need them leaving a few in the ground for next year. One of my favorite plants: nice taste, hassle free and consistently big yields.
I liked the peppery flavour of the mashua. Artichokes took a bit of getting used to.

I roast them
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19-01-2021, 10:57   #107
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I liked the peppery flavour of the mashua. Artichokes took a bit of getting used to.

I roast them

I agree that roasting the Jerusalem artichoke improves their flavour. Also helps to use them fresh out of the ground as they are not as nice when they have been allowed to dry out.


Got a yacon which is another type of edible root crop in a pot at the end of last year so will be planting that in the ground for the first time this year.
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19-01-2021, 16:15   #108
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Agree about roasting Jerusalem Artichokes. They also make great fritters/bhajis grated (raw), mixed with a bit of chickpea flour and fried.

Grew Yacon for the first time this year. Only harvested one plant so far which tasted nice raw and was also nice enough roasted. Very hard on the digestive tract (much worse than Jerusalem Artichokes)... not exactly rushing out to dig more of them (although I should because I don't think they stand well like the J. Artichokes).
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19-01-2021, 21:13   #109
SouthWesterly
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I left the JA for 2 weeks for the inulin to convert to starch.Less side effects

Have yacon and ullicus to plant this year as well.

Gardens for Life has some great video on his YT channel on all these tubers
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19-01-2021, 22:23   #110
macraignil
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I left the JA for 2 weeks for the inulin to convert to starch.Less side effects

Have yacon and ullicus to plant this year as well.

Gardens for Life has some great video on his YT channel on all these tubers

I have never heard anyone else claiming that inulin turns into starch. I don't think what you are claiming is true. This quote from the wikipedia page on inulin is relevant:


"Most plants that synthesize and store inulin do not store other forms of carbohydrate such as starch."


I find them best to eat just straight out of the ground and think the quality reduces if they are allowed to dry out.
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19-01-2021, 22:25   #111
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Took charge of a kilo of Scottish seed potatoes, Sharpe's Express. Onions next and shallots this time with lots of salad greens. I'm wondering if I can keep my winter greens going long enough at tickover level that they might find new vigor in the Spring. Must have a think about other crops.

I'm supposed to be building a tomato house. After last summer I'm not bothering with outdoor cropping.
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19-01-2021, 22:50   #112
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I left the JA for 2 weeks for the inulin to convert to starch.
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I have never heard anyone else claiming that inulin turns into starch. I don't think what you are claiming is true.
Inulin does not convert to starch. If you put the effort in, you can get it to breakdown to fructose, but it's not an easy (or natural) process; quite the opposite - inulin is a very stable carbohydrate, as this study showed:

Quote:
The inulin breakdown occurred when the temperature reached 80C at pH 4 (Fig. 4) however, even after 55 min heating at boiling water bath, only 20% reduction sugar was released.
There has been lots of other work done on inulin too, over the years. To turn it into something else (i.e. fructose), you need to add enzymes or chemical catalysts. Leaving the tubers to sit at ambient temperature will have no effect on the inulin content. @SouthWesterly - if you have any studies at all that claim (or preferably demonstrate) this to be different, I'd be interested to see them, seeing as I have my first JA sitting in a pot out the back waiting to be planted this year.
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20-01-2021, 08:57   #113
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I don't find the Jerusalem Artichokes too bad, I'd put them at the lentil/bean end of the scale. I would be fairly used to eating them so maybe I've built up tolerance. The Yacon on the other hand was more at the stomach cramp/Delhi Belly end of the scale. Maybe I will build up tolerance if I keep eating them - lockdowns are good for this sort of experiment!

IMO Jerusalem Artichoke is a lovely vegetable and unbelievably hardy. There is a patch of them at the home place this last 15 years or more that has survived heavy frost, The Beast from the East and flooding and still comes back every year.
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20-01-2021, 09:53   #114
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Is it too early to start chitting first early potatoes?
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20-01-2021, 13:10   #115
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Chitting is fine from here on for March planting.

-----------------

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Originally Posted by The Master. View Post
last year i bit off more than i could chew and it was a disaster.
this year I want to just grow potatoes.

I have 12 x square metre beds.

how many kilos should I get for 1 square metre?

where is a good place to get them? I feel I may have missed the boat going by some posts on here.
So do you have a bed of 12 metres squared (144 metres area) or 12 square metres?

Plant potatoes at 1 foot intervals. If doing multiple rows zig-zag the pattern with the rows 18in apart.

------X------X------X------X
-
-
---X------X------X------X------X

As for getting them,
https://www.fruithillfarm.com/seeds-...-potatoes.html
https://theirishgardener.com/collect...-seed-potatoes
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02-02-2021, 12:31   #116
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Apart from overwintering, I never plant until 1st February.

Planted my first seeds of 2021 yesterday.
- Chilli Naga Yellow (5)
- Chilli Orange Habanero (10)
- Chilli Shake (15)
- Pepper King of the North (20)
- Pepper Corno Di Torro Rosso (20)

I also mistakenly planted, about 2 months too early !!
- Gherkin Partner (8)

Planting will be ongoing from now on.
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02-02-2021, 18:59   #117
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Got delivery of my seed potatoes today.
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03-02-2021, 10:01   #118
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First few tomato and pepper seeds started inside. Will start a few broad beans as well. I'll make a start on some bed prep this weekend to be ready for the first bit of planting in March
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03-02-2021, 14:57   #119
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Just ordered a walnut cultivar for the garden. My wife is a very happy lady
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09-02-2021, 15:17   #120
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Having watched the rest of ye dabble in all kinds of exotic veg last year, I've decided ... ... ... to stick with the old reliables this year! Well, kind of - as my re-landscaping is now behind schedule, I'm not going to try anything other than what I know I can cope with - so essentially all the same as last year, but with some (such as chilis and peppers) in greater quantities, and others (such as sweetcorn) to be sown in smaller but more frequent batches).

I've been to Lidl and splashed out on a couple of dozen packs of seeds (both the 29 and 65ct) packs (forgot to get Lupins, though :frown: ); picked up five lavender plants this morning to add to the herb garden that's under re-development, along with a standard and a creeping rosemary. The ginger that got off to a such great start didn't survive having to live in the real world ; not sure if it was the wrong temperature, humidity or light that most affected it ... but I picked up another budding corm in Lidl last week, so will try again.

Also received a big bucket full of raspberry canes from a grateful co-worker, for which I'll need to find a place.
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