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20-08-2015, 23:44   #196
Scraiclad
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Thanks they all look worth looking into, especially Bandit Country. Any ideas on Gaelic Ireland? Pre-1600s sort of thing.
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21-08-2015, 10:32   #197
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Thanks they all look worth looking into, especially Bandit Country. Any ideas on Gaelic Ireland? Pre-1600s sort of thing.
Gaelic and Gaelicised Ireland by Kenneth Nicholas is a very good readable book on this period
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28-11-2015, 19:44   #198
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Looking for recommendations on good books on ancient Greece and Rome - books giving an over view rather than specifics to start with. Also any good book on the Franco-Prussian war?
Anything by Michael Grant is good, but they might be OoP
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15-02-2016, 12:40   #199
 
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This is worth a reading for anyone who´s interested in the aftermath of the Easter Rising 1916:

Easter Rising 1916: The Trials, by Seán Enright

The book contains extracts from the files with the protocols on each of the tried by the Military Court which sentenced all of the signatories of the Proclamation to death.

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Quoted from the Website of the irishacademicpress (sorry, but I can´t post links yet):

A pioneering study of the military trials of the Irish rebels following the Easter Rising. An engaging account of the rebellion drawing on recently released archives from the Public Records Office. Fascinating insight into the reactions of the British Government in dealing with the republican prisoners throughout the trials.
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17-02-2016, 11:17   #200
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God's Secret Agents: Queen Elizabeth's Forbidden Priests and the Hatching of the Gunpowder Plot by Alice Hogge. This is Hogge's first book, but she writes well and describes how the Jesuits sent missionaries to England during the anti-Catholic paranoia that followed the Spanish Armada. I was struck by the savagery of the persecution and the courage of the Jesuits. The missionaries slowly gained a foothold, helped by Nicholas Owen - the Oxford joiner who became a master architect of 'priest holes' and secret hiding places. The book skilfully builds up to the needless tragedy (for English Catholicism) of the Gunpowder Plot.
A good 'prequel' would be The Watchers: A Secret History of the Reign of Elizabeth I, by Stephen Alford, focusing on the early years of Elizabeth's reign, particularly the politics and international context, and the espionage and use of covert agents - both by the English state and the Catholic powers hostile to it.

Am still halfway through it but so far, it seems to be arguing simultaneously that Tudor England was a paranoid police-state and that it had much to be paranoid about.

Also, for a relatively 'light' read (in terms of length): Blood Runs Green, by Gillian O'Brien.

Set a little earlier than my usual period of choice (early 20th c. Ireland/War of Independence) amidst the Fenians and Irish-Americans of Chicago, and the high-profile murder and subsequent investigation/trial that showed just how divided the community was.
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05-07-2016, 11:20   #201
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Started On Royalty by Jeremy Paxman. Very well written very fresh and very critical of the whole idea.
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05-07-2016, 12:53   #202
 
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Started On Royalty by Jeremy Paxman. Very well written very fresh and very critical of the whole idea.
Some time ago, I read Paxman´s book about Britain in WWI and I wasn´t that enthusiastic with his style.
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13-07-2016, 22:07   #203
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Some time ago, I read Paxman´s book about Britain in WWI and I wasn´t that enthusiastic with his style.
Nor I Sir. But then again I'm not enthusiastic about any Loyalist adventurers.

Last edited by Manach; 13-07-2016 at 22:23. Reason: Uncivil
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13-07-2016, 22:24   #204
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Please keep on topic and avoid uncivil responses.
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01-09-2016, 22:56   #205
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Recently finished the day michael collins was shot and half way through tim pat coogan michael collins book and am looking for other recommendations on collins/dev books
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22-09-2016, 14:01   #206
 
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Recently finished the day michael collins was shot and half way through tim pat coogan michael collins book and am looking for other recommendations on collins/dev books
Everything by T. Ryle Dwyer is a good reading. I´ve read several books written by that author on Irish history especially Michael Collins / Dev and I prefer him over Pat Coogan.

https://www.mercierpress.ie/authors/tryledwyer/
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22-09-2016, 15:48   #207
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Recently finished the day michael collins was shot and half way through tim pat coogan michael collins book and am looking for other recommendations on collins/dev books
I have some books by Coogan and I have to say, even though he can be wordy, I really have enjoyed them. A great storyteller.
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23-09-2016, 10:21   #208
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I have some books by Coogan and I have to say, even though he can be wordy, I really have enjoyed them. A great storyteller.
Coogan is a storyteller rather than an historian, but the successful writers usually are.
I am ashamed to say that I have more books by this type of writer than serious historians. Especially when I am always telling people to check their stories with primary sources.
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23-09-2016, 11:02   #209
 
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Coogan is a storyteller rather than an historian, but the successful writers usually are.
I am ashamed to say that I have more books by this type of writer than serious historians. Especially when I am always telling people to check their stories with primary sources.
I wouldn´t say that a storyteller can´t match an historian so that one has the qualities of both. What often made it inconvenient to read his books are his small printed quotations. But I´m not like other readers who like to describe his works as being of a lesser value or merit, some even appear to hate him and that´s beyond any reason to me. I have his book about the Irish diaspora ("where ever green is worn") still left to read. Had an overview on the chapters and it promises some interesting parts, covering not just the usual continents where Irish People emigrated to in large numbers, but also parts of European countries.
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23-09-2016, 13:28   #210
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Coogan is a storyteller rather than an historian, but the successful writers usually are.
I am ashamed to say that I have more books by this type of writer than serious historians. Especially when I am always telling people to check their stories with primary sources.
I wouldn't be ashamed at all. All writing is telling stories anyway. That's why I always love Dickens. But Coogan has a very easy style. I don't mind too much if he deviates. I enjoy that aspect of history and reading. There aren't many historians who can grab you. Antonia Fraser (?) is one such. Martin Gilbert too. People have a lot of good things to say about Anthony Beavor (?) and although i have his Spanish war book, I have still to read it. Dan Jones wrote some books on the Plantagenets which were good too.
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