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02-03-2018, 10:52   #46
iwillhtfu
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Originally Posted by harringtonp View Post
Somebody must have an opinion or experience of this, not seeing too much online, anyone ?

And if pouring through the valve subsequent times is less needed as gaps etc will already have been plugged ?
I just pour more in. It doesn't really dry out. I spilled some in the attic a few months ago when I was changing tyres and it's still wet to touch.

I still put in the same amount when filling through the valve it's only a tiny bit used to cover the rim when seating anyway. you could probably put in less if you wanted but hardly any weight savings if that's your concern.
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02-03-2018, 11:50   #47
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If you open the valve isn't all the sealant going to come out? Wouldn't you have to put in new sealant under pressure like from and CO2 canister?
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02-03-2018, 12:29   #48
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If you open the valve isn't all the sealant going to come out? Wouldn't you have to put in new sealant under pressure like from and CO2 canister?
When fitting it I had to open the valve with sealant already in and not much came out. If you open it with the valve at 12 I'd imagine almost nothing comes out
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02-03-2018, 12:32   #49
harringtonp
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I just pour more in. It doesn't really dry out. I spilled some in the attic a few months ago when I was changing tyres and it's still wet to touch.

I still put in the same amount when filling through the valve it's only a tiny bit used to cover the rim when seating anyway. you could probably put in less if you wanted but hardly any weight savings if that's your concern.
Suppose I'm wondering if you keep putting in 30mls every few months without cleaning. 7x30ml is 210ml is approx 210g and this is extra weight.

But I wonder does the old stuff just eventually vanishes and as you say the extra weight is negligible ?

I ask because once you take the tyre off you have to reseat it and there is always the risk that this just may not happen for you.
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02-03-2018, 12:36   #50
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at 100psi? if the sealant doesn't come out how would it ever fix a puncture?
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02-03-2018, 12:38   #51
harringtonp
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at 100psi? if the sealant doesn't come out how would it ever fix a puncture?
Because when you get a puncture the wheel is rotating
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02-03-2018, 13:06   #52
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Because when you get a puncture the wheel is rotating
This. Tubeless sealant only works because of the centrifugal force it experiences while the wheel is rotating spreading it around the inside of the tyre. If you had a stationary wheel and punctured the tyre at the top, it won't seal most of the time. It's not aerosolised or anything, so as mentioned if you remove the valve core with the valve at the top of the wheel there won't be much leakage. Though even if it was at 3 or 4 on a clock face, I wouldn't expect much either, as 70ml is only about 2 shots of spirits!
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02-03-2018, 19:52   #53
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I have just converted to tubeless tyres for my race bike. Early days but my initial observation is that it was unbelievably hard to get them on in the first place. Broke 4 tyre levers. In fact you have to be aware how close you are to breaking the levers. Carbon rims so I don't want to go for metal levers. Normally you can get by with 2 levers. Now I need the 3, and you have to take off smaller 'bites'. In the end you'll have just about an inch of the bead to get on, but find it very hard to get the third lever under the bead. Taking them off is even harder. I think if I ever get a puncture on the road (that the sealant won't fix) I'll just have to get a taxi home (even though I have a spare tube in the saddle bag).
On the plus side, I had no problem getting the first tyre to seal with just a normal track pump. Different story with the second tyre. Turns out there was a big leak between the rim tape and the valve, The sealant came pissing out through the vent hole in the carbon rim. I used almost all my sealant, and made a right mess in the kitchen. On my last attempt I just put my finger over the vent hole for a second (to stop the leak) and he-presto, the sealant worked. Like black magic.
By the way, before I went totally tubeless I put sealant into my normal tubes. Only realised when I took off the tyre recently that I had obviously got a puncture previously that I never even noticed. Sealant did it's job. Highly recommend this approach, for a winter bike at least.
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07-03-2018, 09:55   #54
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I have just converted to tubeless tyres for my race bike. Early days but my initial observation is that it was unbelievably hard to get them on in the first place. Broke 4 tyre levers. In fact you have to be aware how close you are to breaking the levers. Carbon rims so I don't want to go for metal levers. Normally you can get by with 2 levers. Now I need the 3, and you have to take off smaller 'bites'. In the end you'll have just about an inch of the bead to get on, but find it very hard to get the third lever under the bead. Taking them off is even harder. I think if I ever get a puncture on the road (that the sealant won't fix) I'll just have to get a taxi home (even though I have a spare tube in the saddle bag).
On the plus side, I had no problem getting the first tyre to seal with just a normal track pump. Different story with the second tyre. Turns out there was a big leak between the rim tape and the valve, The sealant came pissing out through the vent hole in the carbon rim. I used almost all my sealant, and made a right mess in the kitchen. On my last attempt I just put my finger over the vent hole for a second (to stop the leak) and he-presto, the sealant worked. Like black magic.
By the way, before I went totally tubeless I put sealant into my normal tubes. Only realised when I took off the tyre recently that I had obviously got a puncture previously that I never even noticed. Sealant did it's job. Highly recommend this approach, for a winter bike at least.
I think every rim/tyre combination will be different. I had to work hard to get the Schwalbe Pro One 23mm on a Velocity A23 rim (3 levers with lots of flex) but a Schwalbe Pro one 25mm went on to a Carbonal rim almost too easy (no levers)
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07-03-2018, 11:55   #55
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Think the thread title is misleading , should read "pain in the b0llix to get on and pain in the h0le to get offf" that's just from reading the reviews....
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07-03-2018, 12:26   #56
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Think the thread title is misleading , should read "pain in the b0llix to get on and pain in the h0le to get offf" that's just from reading the reviews....
Like everything new there is a learning curve and I think you have to judge maintenance effort once the basics have been learned.

Nobody here bats an eyelid at clincher management as we have been doing it since kids (how old were you when you fixed your first puncture..). But if you consider all the tricks you learned over the years with clinchers to make puncture repair and new tube/tyre install as easy as possible there is a lot of knowledge that has been built up.

I'm early in the learning stages of tubeless but don't get the feeling that it is more complex than clinchers. Tube management is replaced by sealant management and getting the tyre to seal.

And it will only get easier as it becomes common knowledge which rims and tyres work well together (I remember been unable to get a tyre on to a clincher and having to bring it to the LBS to do it)

Some of the "tubeless experience" posts above are long but could you imagine how long a post could be if a newbie posted every little detail about how they got a tyre and tube on to a clincher.
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07-03-2018, 13:03   #57
cyfac
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Originally Posted by youtheman View Post
I have just converted to tubeless tyres for my race bike. Early days but my initial observation is that it was unbelievably hard to get them on in the first place. Broke 4 tyre levers. In fact you have to be aware how close you are to breaking the levers. Carbon rims so I don't want to go for metal levers. Normally you can get by with 2 levers. Now I need the 3, and you have to take off smaller 'bites'. In the end you'll have just about an inch of the bead to get on, but find it very hard to get the third lever under the bead. Taking them off is even harder. I think if I ever get a puncture on the road (that the sealant won't fix) I'll just have to get a taxi home (even though I have a spare tube in the saddle bag).
On the plus side, I had no problem getting the first tyre to seal with just a normal track pump. Different story with the second tyre. Turns out there was a big leak between the rim tape and the valve, The sealant came pissing out through the vent hole in the carbon rim. I used almost all my sealant, and made a right mess in the kitchen. On my last attempt I just put my finger over the vent hole for a second (to stop the leak) and he-presto, the sealant worked. Like black magic.
By the way, before I went totally tubeless I put sealant into my normal tubes. Only realised when I took off the tyre recently that I had obviously got a puncture previously that I never even noticed. Sealant did it's job. Highly recommend this approach, for a winter bike at least.

You need to invest in a set of tubeless specific tyre levers any of the on line shops will have them i use them on my 50mm carbons and there perfect although i admit they take a fair bit of grunt at the end one lever is specifically for mounting the other removing they cant actually be used for clinchers they are the specific tool for this job
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07-03-2018, 13:19   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by youtheman View Post
I have just converted to tubeless tyres for my race bike.  Early days but my initial observation is that it was unbelievably hard to get them on in the first place.  Broke 4 tyre levers.  In fact you have to be aware how close you are to breaking the levers.  Carbon rims so I don't want to go for metal levers. Normally you can get by with 2 levers.  Now I need the 3, and you have to take off smaller 'bites'.  In the end you'll have just about an inch of the bead to get on, but find it very hard to get the third lever under the bead.  Taking them off is even harder.  I think if I ever get a puncture on the road (that the sealant won't fix) I'll just have to get a taxi home (even though I have a spare tube in the saddle bag).
On the plus side, I had no problem getting the first tyre to seal with just a normal track pump.  Different story with the second tyre.  Turns out there was a big leak between the rim tape and the valve,  The sealant came pissing out through the vent hole in the carbon rim.  I used almost all my sealant, and made a right mess in the kitchen.  On my last attempt I just put my finger over the vent hole for a second (to stop the leak) and he-presto, the sealant worked. Like black magic.
By the way, before I went totally tubeless I put sealant into my normal tubes.  Only realised when I took off the tyre recently that I had obviously got a puncture previously that I never even noticed.  Sealant did it's job.  Highly recommend this approach, for a winter bike at least.

You need to invest in a set of tubeless specific tyre levers any of the on line shops will have them i use them on my 50mm carbons and there perfect although i admit they take a fair bit of grunt at the end one lever is specifically for mounting the other removing  they cant actually be used for clinchers they are the specific tool for this job
Sounds very interesting.  Do you have a link by any chance?.  I'd definitely purchase if they will make the job easier.
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07-03-2018, 16:04   #59
brownian
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you might consider a tyrekey?
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07-03-2018, 16:15   #60
ford2600
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Just fitted Schwalbe G one speed 35mm tyres on DT Swiss R460 rim and was surprised how easy it was.

Tyres shouldn't be the problem on the cobbles!
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