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12-12-2017, 11:35   #31
aworthycause
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Good advice @elVino also, holding the wheel horizontally and spinning helps the sealant get its way around
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12-12-2017, 11:43   #32
axer
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Sounds to me for a commuter cycling on urban roads it would be safer to go clinchers like GP 4 seasons. Sounds like tubeless are relatively ok against punctures but when they go wrong they go horribly wrong whereas if using normal tyres with a tube then worst case scenario a quick tube change resolves issues. Think I will ditch the tubeless and go clincher on my new bike. Thanks for advice.
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12-12-2017, 11:51   #33
aworthycause
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That doesn't really make sense. If you read the first post, they allow you to ride out many punctures. If you get one that's too big for the sealant to work on, stick in a tube and ride it like a clincher.

Relatively ok? Relative to what? Stopping? I have had two punctures in races, both of which I ost no speed and finished the races. The sealant closed it up.

Horribly wrong? It's just putting a tire on a wheel. How horrible can it be?
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12-12-2017, 12:21   #34
Eamonnator
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I don't want to put people off going tubeless because of my experience.
Thanks to everybody, who has given me advice.
Apologies again to O.P. for completely derailing the thread.

I started off again this morning on the wheels.
I put a tube in and inflated the tyre, it was hard to get the tyre on. I took the tube out and reseated the tyre. I put in 60mls of sealant, through the valve, having first removed the core. I rotated the tyre to get the fluid well distributed. I held the wheel off the ground and tried to pump with a track pump. No joy. I tried a CO2 cartridge. No joy. I then sealed around the tyre and rim with duct tape. I tried again. No joy. I then got soapy water and put that around the tyre bead. Still no joy. I also tried rolling the wheel along the ground to seat the tyre.
I think my problem is that the beads of the tyre won't hook onto the rim. But nothing I do helps, there's always a gap between the tyre bead and the side of the rim.
Anyway, I'm running out of CO2 cartridges, patience and ideas. I have now hung the wheels in the garage and hopefully, before Spring, a miracle will occur.


Thanks again to all, who tried to help.

E.

Last edited by Eamonnator; 12-12-2017 at 12:43.
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12-12-2017, 15:14   #35
triggermortis
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I have tubeless on my MTB and never have any problem inflating new tyres. I use a track pump and keep the valve at the 12 o'clock position and press the tyre towards the rim with my hand thats not operating the pump. That forces the tyre to go towards the seating position on the rim. Usually the tyre stats popping (literally - it makes a popping noise) into place and I pump it until its fully inflated. Soapy water helps to seat the tyre and see any leaks.
Once it has been inflated for 5 minutes, I deflate it, remove the valve core and pour in the sealant (I use Stans) refit the core and re-inflate - keeping the tyre upright and the valve at 12 o'clock. Then I give it a good spin to move the sealant all around.
@ Eamonnator - If you're close to NCD, I'm working lates all week and so have every morning free if you want a second pair of hands to try and get them fitted. I've never tried road wheels, but it can't be impossible
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12-12-2017, 15:41   #36
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Soem great tips on this thread - thank you all!
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12-12-2017, 15:49   #37
axer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aworthycause View Post
That doesn't really make sense. If you read the first post, they allow you to ride out many punctures. If you get one that's too big for the sealant to work on, stick in a tube and ride it like a clincher.

Relatively ok? Relative to what? Stopping? I have had two punctures in races, both of which I ost no speed and finished the races. The sealant closed it up.

Horribly wrong? It's just putting a tire on a wheel. How horrible can it be?
My concern is being stuck trying to get the tyre off and back on the wheel if it is more difficult than a clincher. Don't fancy trying to do that in cold weather or when it is lashing raining. Would there be sealant all over my hands also?
Then if there are any issues with sealant and using co2.
As andy69 asked, what are the advantages for a road bike with tubeless over, say, Gp 4 seasons tyres with a tube?
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12-12-2017, 17:27   #38
cyfac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axer View Post
My concern is being stuck trying to get the tyre off and back on the wheel if it is more difficult than a clincher. Don't fancy trying to do that in cold weather or when it is lashing raining. Would there be sealant all over my hands also?
Then if there are any issues with sealant and using co2.
As andy69 asked, what are the advantages for a road bike with tubeless over, say, Gp 4 seasons tyres with a tube?
Tubeless are simply superior in every way using all year round for the past 3 years on cr*p roads here in cork sealant has never failed to seal when called on i think the problem with the fitting may be with the width of the rim a wider rim gives greater ability to tease on the tyre also you can buy tyre levers specific for tubeless check out the cycle clinic website for videos on fitting etc he is a sound guy i have 3 sets of wheels from him each better than the last
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12-12-2017, 20:27   #39
rollingscone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axer View Post
My concern is being stuck trying to get the tyre off and back on the wheel if it is more difficult than a clincher. Don't fancy trying to do that in cold weather or when it is lashing raining. Would there be sealant all over my hands also?
Then if there are any issues with sealant and using co2.
As andy69 asked, what are the advantages for a road bike with tubeless over, say, Gp 4 seasons tyres with a tube?
You only need C02 to install it not to put in a tube.

The only (rare) problem that could occur is the bead suctioning to the rim like an octopus it's never happened to me on the road and only once at home.

Basically I carry a small aluminium clamp for such an occurrence but I'm sure something could be improvised with a cable tie.
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12-12-2017, 23:12   #40
nilhg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyfac View Post
Tubeless are simply superior in every way using all year round for the past 3 years on cr*p roads here in cork sealant has never failed to seal when called on i think the problem with the fitting may be with the width of the rim a wider rim gives greater ability to tease on the tyre also you can buy tyre levers specific for tubeless check out the cycle clinic website for videos on fitting etc he is a sound guy i have 3 sets of wheels from him each better than the last
The video on the cycle clinic site referenced above would suggest that Eamonnator's problem might be solved by adding some extra rim tape,

https://thecycleclinic.co.uk/pages/tech-page
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28-02-2018, 23:09   #41
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Reviving this great thread as just fitted a rear Schwalbe Pro tyre to a Velocity A23 rim. Took the tape that came with the wheel off and added two layers of

https://www.mantel.com/uk/schwalbe-tubeless-rim-tape

as was advised to go around twice when pressures are higher.

Bought a Lifeline Airblast from CRC before Xmas (reduced to 43 euro at the time)

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/i.../rp-prod155451

and it worked a treat. The pump is very solid and should be great for normal use too. Initially air was coming out slowly and this seemed mostly around the valve so took the tyre off and put a small amount of sealant around the valve area (which was at 12 o clock) and went again with the Airblast. This time pressure seemed to be holding. So took out the valve core, put in the larger part of 60mm of Schwalbe Doc Blue (note to self, in future have the right amount in container and squirt it all in rather than trying to guess when half way through a 60 mm bottle) and reinflated.

Noticed that pressure would hold but then as you'd pump it up more it would leak and the eventually hold the higher pressure as you keep pumping. Spun the wheel vertically and saw that the height varied. Though initially that it wasn't a tru wheel but then realised that the tyre was a lot lower on one side than the other. The lower side was not seated properly even though it was holding pressure. So let the air out and with a tyre lever took the tyre off at the low side before putting it on again. Did this a couple of times in different places and finally managed to get it seated properly all the way around and the height was constant on spinning as expected. Noticed plenty of loud pops this time as I inflated to 100PSI and air seemed to be holding well. Plan on riding it at 75-80 but decided to go to higher pressure initially to be sure of seating it properly.

Have not ridden it yet and there was a lot of experimentation getting it on but I'm hoping this is a once off learning experience.

I had a go with tubeless on different rims last summer but couldn't manage it. The A23s may be easier but I suspect the real difference was the lifeline Airblast pump. If you don't have this type of pump Eamonator I'd invest in one and try again.
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01-03-2018, 10:13   #42
gmacww
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Question. New wheels are tubeless ready and I'm toying with the idea to go tubeless for the commuter. If you get a puncture can you still use the tyre until it wears out fully or is it like a car tyre? As in with emergency sealant on a car tyre it's to get you home. ASAP you replace or get the tyre repaired. Is it the same with tubeless bike tyres? Obviously if it's a big slit then yes but for standard punctures?
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01-03-2018, 10:27   #43
brownian
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No, you keep using the tyre. Small holes (the usual kind) self-seal. If you lost some air, pump up and go. Otherwise just go. I got a puncture a few months back, and pumped the tyre back up, and rode on. Haven't looked at it since.

You can fix small to medium holes with an anchovy - a bit of rubber, basically. Big gashes mean the bin, as with any other tyre.
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01-03-2018, 14:05   #44
harringtonp
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Question guys, when you are putting in more sealant do you just take out the valve head and pour it in over the old sealant or do you take the tyre off and try and clean the old sealant off ?
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02-03-2018, 10:05   #45
harringtonp
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Question guys, when you are putting in more sealant do you just take out the valve head and pour it in over the old sealant or do you take the tyre off and try and clean the old sealant off ?
Somebody must have an opinion or experience of this, not seeing too much online, anyone ?

And if pouring through the valve subsequent times is less needed as gaps etc will already have been plugged ?
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