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10-01-2017, 21:19   #16
saccades
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Originally Posted by Pigeon Reaper View Post
They're no more likely to fail than rim brakes. The main reason for brake fade is overheating due to constant use like an Alpine descent. Rim brakes would also have issues with the same type of use. Hydraulic brakes can fail if there's a leak in the system but this is similar to having a brake cable snap. Every once in a while check for damage and pad wear. Keep anything you wouldn't like on the old rim brakes away from the discs.

Enjoy the extra performance in the wet!
Disc brakes prefer shorter, sharper braking compared to rim brakes - try not to drag/feather the brakes on a long descent. Use more smaller amounts of more aggressive braking (but not savage braking unless bedding in).

Don't touch the rotors with fingers (especially when moving), keep an eye on the pads (organic brake better but wear out quicker than sintered), if they get low swap them out before it's the metal pad backing in direct contact with the rotor as it'll score the rotor and knacker them.
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10-01-2017, 21:58   #17
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Disc brakes prefer shorter, sharper braking compared to rim brakes - try not to drag/feather the brakes on a long descent. Use more smaller amounts of more aggressive braking (but not savage braking unless bedding in).

Don't touch the rotors with fingers (especially when moving), keep an eye on the pads (organic brake better but wear out quicker than sintered), if they get low swap them out before it's the metal pad backing in direct contact with the rotor as it'll score the rotor and knacker them.
Difficult to do this when you're not used to them without sending yourself sailing over the handlebars. I'm sure there's a trick to it…
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11-01-2017, 00:09   #18
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If you are using mechanical disc brakes, if mine are anything to go by then the braking will be on a par with v-brakes - rarely better, even in the wet, and sometimes worse.

I have Hayes CX-Expert calipers paired with SRAM Apex levers, 160mm rotors, and reasonable quality cables. I've used them with Swissstop organic pads and Hayes and Nukeproof sintered pads. The organic pads had more bite but predictably shorter lifespan.

A bit of a pain with my combination is that the only cable tension fittings are at the caliper, and I run out of tensioning capacity before the pads wear out. At that stage I have to either throw away pads with life left in them or get out an allen key and pull the inner cable shorter - it's a small thing, no more than a couple of minutes work, but it's annoying.

I maintain another bike with Ultrega 6800 levers and Avid BB7 calipers, it's not mine so I've only ridden it for a matter of minutes but I'm left with the impression that that's a better combination. Basically though, mechanical disc brakes are not as different from rim brakes as some of the hype would have you believe.

Hydraulic brakes are better in terms of feel - the levers are "lighter" to use and therefore easier to modulate, but use unsuitable pads (or contaminated pads which I suspect is the particular issue in my case) and the braking quality is still in the realm of rim brakes from my limited experience of them recently. To make hydraulic brakes live up to their promise you need a well bled system with decent pads and suitably sized rotors.

The maintenance required will vary depending on whether you are using mechanical discs, which tend to have one fixed pad and one moving pad, or hydraulic discs, which tend to have two moving pads.

With mechanical you have to adjust that fixed pad over time so that the rotor always hits the pad rather than the body of the caliper. And beware of the cable tension, if you let the pads wear down too far without keeping the cable tension in check then you'll bottom out when you pull the lever fully and you'll have no brake. Easy enough to avoid by checking the state of your pads and cable routinely though.
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17-01-2017, 08:59   #19
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Ok, I think this might be a stupid question... The front sus appeared to be seized at the top rather than a loss of grease internally, so cassette and chain ordered.

One issue it was having before it's hibernation was the front quick release working loose. Tried cleaning them etc, so before looking at possible bigger issues the internet tells me it could be, I want to try and new quick release...

So sizing of/ buying quick releases - is it the width/ distance between the drop outs, or the length of the skewer? It's a 100mm distance between the drop outs, so it's a "100mm" length skewer I need is it?

Ok, found the answer on Chain Reactions website - not just my bike maintenance skills that are a bit rubbish as it turns out...

Last edited by Macy0161; 17-01-2017 at 15:10. Reason: Found Answer
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17-01-2017, 11:36   #20
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Quick one what sort of things should you look at if you were doing a basic service at home?
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17-01-2017, 12:14   #21
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Quick one what sort of things should you look at if you were doing a basic service at home?
Clean chain and clean and lube moving parts.
Check brake pads and cables. Where pads are worn you often need to tighten cables slightly. Any wear on pads and replace them. Check rims for wear.
Check gear cables and indexing, making sure all cables run smoothly.
Any interference on brake or gear cables, i tend to replace innners an outers.
Check tyres for wear and any embedded crap that may lead to a puncture. Check pressure.
I usually also remove wheels and grease dropouts which can be a source of noise otherwise.
Give the bike a test run, checking brakes and all gears.
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17-01-2017, 12:59   #22
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Will this < BB on CRC >(English Thread 68mm) fit my canyon Roadlite in the pics below:


Attached Images
File Type: jpg BB1.jpg (25.7 KB, 797 views)
File Type: jpg BB2.jpg (32.0 KB, 798 views)
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17-01-2017, 13:18   #23
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^^^ Yes.
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17-01-2017, 13:59   #24
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Clean chain and clean and lube moving parts
And what a bítch karma truly is. Hadn't cleaned my chain after my last spin and the fecker broke going up Cruagh road at lunch today. To be fair it was actually the split link that broke, and I noticed the chain was feeling a bit clunky to be fair. New enough chain, but on inspection it is already in crap condition thanks to not being looked after properly. Out of interest, do people use a different chain lube in winter? I usually degrease, rinse, dry thoroughly and use a spray on lube, but it is so much lighter than the sticky lube the chain comes with. The father said at one point he used to boil the chain in wax which sounds like it might work.
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18-01-2017, 23:49   #25
doozerie
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And what a bítch karma truly is. Hadn't cleaned my chain after my last spin and the fecker broke going up Cruagh road at lunch today. To be fair it was actually the split link that broke, and I noticed the chain was feeling a bit clunky to be fair. New enough chain, but on inspection it is already in crap condition thanks to not being looked after properly. Out of interest, do people use a different chain lube in winter? I usually degrease, rinse, dry thoroughly and use a spray on lube, but it is so much lighter than the sticky lube the chain comes with. The father said at one point he used to boil the chain in wax which sounds like it might work.
For my "good" bikes I use the same lube all year round. It's a light one (ProGold ProLink) which is meant to clean as well as lube. I like it largely because, in addition to working reasonably well as a lube, you just need to wipe the chain down and re-apply it (and wipe off the excess) and you are done. It does wash off in sustained heavy rain though, so fine for rides of a few hours but arguably not great for the likes of audax riding.

There is a ProLink Extreme version which is more water resistant, but I've yet to try it. The more water resistant/heavier a lube is, the harder it is to clean off the chain before re-applying new lube, generally = more headache.

For my commute bike I flit between a relatively light oil (which doesn't last as long but requires less effort to clean off) and a heavier oil (which lasts longer but is a pain to clean off) - I tend to prefer the former, but then again I'm not very kind to my commute bike generally.

Using wax for chains is a method I've read about but never tried. There was a test of various lubes and lubing methods a few years back where the wax was found to be the most effective in terms of performance. It's a lot of effort though, it seems like it'd only be worth the effort if you wanted to eek that last fraction of wattage of performance out of your chain, and you'd probably want to reserve it for your "good days" bike rather than a bike you use regularly. You'd also want to have a lot of faith in the re-usable split links you'd need for such a chain, or just change them regularly.
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22-01-2017, 19:04   #26
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disc brakes - i've a slight suspicion that brakes on my bike may not be contaminated, but slightly misaligned (as i'm getting a bit of juddering under braking); does anyone know if the doohickey mentioned about 1:05s into this video is needed? i.e. what would happen if you pulled the brake with the mounts slightly loosened, without that doohickey?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1T2RLgQoyvs

obviously i don't want to replace the pads and then find that it was a misalignment to begin with.
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22-01-2017, 20:15   #27
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and assuming they are contaminated, if you don't have isopropyl alcohol to clean the disc, will acetone (i.e. nail varnish remover) do?
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24-01-2017, 17:19   #28
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Can you take off a shimano or mavic freehub withough taking out the axel?
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24-01-2017, 20:27   #29
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Can you take off a shimano or mavic freehub withough taking out the axel?
No, the bolt that holds the freehub to the main hub body has the axle going through it, so you need to remove the axle to get the removal tool in there.
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25-01-2017, 11:06   #30
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No, the bolt that holds the freehub to the main hub body has the axle going through it, so you need to remove the axle to get the removal tool in there.
I was hoping for some magic way of removing the freewheel by just loosing the doo-haa, unscrewing the thingy and pulling the whatsit. Such a crappy system that needs redesigning so the freewheel can be removed from the hub without removing the axel. Bring back the old days where the freewheel was attached to the cassette which was screwed on to the hub.
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