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06-08-2011, 21:27   #16
jinghong
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Looking at that red bullit and thinking to myself "I must have you" in my finest withnail and I accent
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06-08-2011, 21:40   #17
enas
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Looking at that red bullit and thinking to myself "I must have you" in my finest withnail and I accent
Glad to see I'm not alone Since the day the thread has started, I've been constantly thinking that I would really like to have one of these. I manage to come back to reality by thinking that with all the hills in Cork, I would be better off with a trike for a cargo bike (even if I wasn't planning to buy one at the first place).
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07-08-2011, 12:43   #18
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I am he with the Big Dummy



It's a good bike more than capable of carrying a weekly shop and other large objects. Add in some wide loaders and a long loader and it would be capable of carrying pretty much anything.

I would prefer it over a trike because it's more maneuverable and more flexible than a trike and it's also easier to store.
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12-08-2011, 23:33   #19
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I'ma actually passing through the netherlands next week and will have the ability to buy one and bring it back (large camper on toe). My main driver is that herself doesn't drive, and we're moving to a new location soon, and we want to have the flexibility to be located a couple of kms out of town if necessary. We have a 1 yr old and another due soon. She needs to be mobile and independent herself, as I'll be away working during the day.
Because of that I'm leaning towards a bakfiets 3 wheeler with a 250 watt battery assist drive. she had a bad fall a couple of years back so she's a little nervous. For that reason I want to give this my best shot at making it work, so I'm thinking 3 wheels versus 2 This company actually ships them to Ireland apparently free.

So, some people think 2 wheels are better (I would have been biased that way myself, but thinking of her needs changes my mind), others think 2 are best. Anyone else got any opinions on this, and if going for a battery assist would be useful (pushing 2 kids up a hill sounds like work)?
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13-08-2011, 12:26   #20
Harrybelafonte
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I'ma actually passing through the netherlands next week and will have the ability to buy one and bring it back (large camper on toe). My main driver is that herself doesn't drive, and we're moving to a new location soon, and we want to have the flexibility to be located a couple of kms out of town if necessary. We have a 1 yr old and another due soon. She needs to be mobile and independent herself, as I'll be away working during the day.
Because of that I'm leaning towards a bakfiets 3 wheeler with a 250 watt battery assist drive. she had a bad fall a couple of years back so she's a little nervous. For that reason I want to give this my best shot at making it work, so I'm thinking 3 wheels versus 2 This company actually ships them to Ireland apparently free.

So, some people think 2 wheels are better (I would have been biased that way myself, but thinking of her needs changes my mind), others think 2 are best. Anyone else got any opinions on this, and if going for a battery assist would be useful (pushing 2 kids up a hill sounds like work)?
For the situation you describe I'd tend towards the Christriana type three wheeler. Both your children will still need to be in baby seats I guess so a trike may make more sense? Did you look into gearing before looking at the engine?
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13-08-2011, 13:40   #21
jinghong
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I just dont now if using an electric assist makes sense with a bike or not. I wouldnt dream of using one myself. It's like admitting failure. But then again, I relish a good 150km spin on a good day. Herself is a different story, although pretty fit, if there are less barriers to using it, it will be used more, you know yourself..So does an electric drive help much with carrying a load?
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13-08-2011, 13:48   #22
jinghong
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BTW the link I posted above may be to cheaper chineese imports, which are quickly developing a bad reputation for cargo bikes I've learned. I'm not sure it the bikes there seem too cheap..
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13-08-2011, 14:12   #23
Harrybelafonte
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I know nothing about electric motors unfortunately. Nor do I know much about the Chinese cargo bikes. I do, however, have a Bullitt set up to carry a child, older though, which you are welcome to have a look over.
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13-08-2011, 14:31   #24
jinghong
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Cheers for that I might look you up when I get back
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13-08-2011, 18:27   #25
tomasrojo
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The Nihola is quite a nice-looking three-wheeler too. Doesn't have as big a storage space as the Christiania, but the wheels move independently of the box. I think if I get one, I'll get that one, as I could use the goods trailer in conjunction, if I needed more storage. It would cut quite a sight too!
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14-08-2011, 12:08   #26
dubmess
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I have a white Bullitt I'm considering selling, I want to get a three wheeler to put my kid in.

I was part of Velocity Couriers, so it's seen a few miles, but also been looked after. Everything is in working order, just needs new brake pads for the disks.

I also have the aluminium box and honeycomb bottom board that comes as an extra for the bike.

Retails for €2173 without the box or honeycomb bottom board, box is €296, honeycomb board is €161.

I'm looking for €1500 for the lot.
Here's a pic: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dublinm...57603473483270
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20-08-2013, 15:08   #27
tomasrojo
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I saw a Gazelle Cabby cargo bike locked in town yesterday. Looks interesting, with a collapsible cloth "box". Anyone have experience of one? Are they stocked in Dublin somewhere?

I'm broke, but I fondly imagine I'll find a suitcase of cash in my garden soon, or something like that.
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20-08-2013, 16:49   #28
Doctor Bob
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Are they stocked in Dublin somewhere?
2 Wheels in Sandymount used to sell them, but I think they stopped stocking Gazelles. Might be worth calling them anyway.

PS I recently lost a suitcase of cash, so if you do find one, it's probably mine.
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20-08-2013, 17:24   #29
Harrybelafonte
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Actually, I'm trying to find some sort of lockable metal box that'll attach to the Bullitt now that the child is too big for the wooden one. Anyone got any suggestions?
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20-08-2013, 19:23   #30
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Will anybody bother cutting into the wooden box if you add a lockable lid? Might have to run the hinges down the sides for security though.
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