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26-09-2018, 21:34   #1
mzungu
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Assisted Suicide

A recent study found that Americans are slightly more accepting of suicide today than they were in the 1980s. However, the vast majority still disapprove, but many will allow it in cases where a person is suffering from an incurable disease. Back in the 1980s 46.9% agreed with assisted suicide in those circumstances, that has now risen to 61.4%.

Interestingly, researchers believe the increased acceptance is down to a more educated population. They suggest that acceptability of suicide is greater among the highly educated (could also be the conclusion of other studies although I am not sure).

Thoughts?

Link: https://psmag.com/news/americans-att...-are-softening
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27-09-2018, 12:03   #2
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I think in a civilised world, if a person is in full possession of their faculties and makes the decision that their quality of life is such that they no longer wish to carry on living, then it is cruel to make them do so.

Furthermore, it is immature as a society to seek to punish someone who provides assistance to a person in such a situation if they have a reduced capacity.

I think as we mature as a society, we will come to see this as acceptable, so long as there are safeguards there, as well as support and assistance to ensure that people are making and informed choice.
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27-09-2018, 21:09   #3
mzungu
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I think in a civilised world, if a person is in full possession of their faculties and makes the decision that their quality of life is such that they no longer wish to carry on living, then it is cruel to make them do so.

Furthermore, it is immature as a society to seek to punish someone who provides assistance to a person in such a situation if they have a reduced capacity.

I think as we mature as a society, we will come to see this as acceptable, so long as there are safeguards there, as well as support and assistance to ensure that people are making and informed choice.
I agree. It makes little sense to allow people to suffer needlessly if they wish to exit at an earlier stage. The question is should it also need to extended to those with chronic mental health illnesses

At the start of the summer, the worlds oldest working scientist Dr David Goodall made headlines when he availed of the option to die with dignity in Basle. By turning a wheel he administered a lethal injection into his arm (listening to Beethoven as he did it). It was his belief that everybody over middle age should have the right to be assisted in ending their life when they choose. Even if they have absolutely nothing wrong with them. In one sense you could say that it gives everybody autonomy, in another you could also argue that it could cheapen life.

Nevertheless, assisted suicide for the sick should be brought in, but it may take a while before we see it here. As it stands, I believe the state stops people travelling abroad for assisted suicide (the Marie Fleming case), this is wrong and should be rectified.
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28-09-2018, 18:17   #4
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They suggest that acceptability of suicide is greater among the highly educated
Not surprising.
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28-09-2018, 20:40   #5
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I take a medication that can have ,at best,seriously disabling side effects and at worse death. I'm also a horse owner. It's odd that, if his life gets badly impaired, that he can be destroyed, but mine can't.
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28-09-2018, 21:00   #6
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I take a medication that can have ,at best,seriously disabling side effects and at worse death. I'm also a horse owner. It's odd that, if his life gets badly impaired, that he can be destroyed, but mine can't.
And not only that....for the horse it would be considered to be the 'humane' thing to do....Wrap your head around that one

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01-10-2018, 18:41   #7
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In America state laws differ. "On October 27, 1997, Oregon enacted the Death with Dignity Act which allows terminally-ill Oregonians to end their lives through the voluntary self-administration of lethal medications, expressly prescribed by a physician for that purpose." California's physician-assisted suicide law is overturned — for now.
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02-10-2018, 20:27   #8
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In America state laws differ. "On October 27, 1997, Oregon enacted the Death with Dignity Act which allows terminally-ill Oregonians to end their lives through the voluntary self-administration of lethal medications, expressly prescribed by a physician for that purpose." California's physician-assisted suicide law is overturned — for now.
IIRC it is still listed as homicide in American law (open to correction on this) if a person assists another in dying (lay person or physician). However, the framework allows for lawful homicide (in certain places) and would come under justifiable or excusable homicide. In other countries, this is definitely not the case and it is a legal minefield (understandably). It is legal in some countries, but in the majority it is not. Not yet anyway. Hopefully soon though.
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18-06-2019, 19:04   #9
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it is all too easy to abuse.
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20-06-2019, 17:11   #10
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In America there have been frequent legal disputes over when do you turn off the machines that may be keeping flat-liner's bodies alive?
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20-06-2019, 22:21   #11
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In America there have been frequent legal disputes over when do you turn off the machines that may be keeping flat-liner's bodies alive?
US Supreme Court cases?
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21-06-2019, 21:05   #12
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In America there have been frequent legal disputes over when do you turn off the machines that may be keeping flat-liner's bodies alive?
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Originally Posted by Fathom View Post
US Supreme Court cases?
Does this happen in cases where the family want to keep the person alive, even if it was against their wishes?

I have no issue with assisted suicide, as long as appropriate checks and balances are in place.
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22-06-2019, 17:18   #13
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Does this happen in cases where the family want to keep the person alive, even if it was against their wishes?
Sometimes family either wishes to keep patient alive, or unplug. Special religious, social, and political interests groups get involved too, either for or against. Then there are state laws that affect decisions of this sort, either for or against, and their interpretation by courts, law enforcement, city, county, state administration's policies and procedures. The list goes on.
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28-06-2019, 16:17   #14
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Sometimes family either wishes to keep patient alive, or unplug. Special religious, social, and political interests groups get involved too, either for or against. Then there are state laws that affect decisions of this sort, either for or against, and their interpretation by courts, law enforcement, city, county, state administration's policies and procedures. The list goes on.
The issue still gets used as a political football. A great shame. When this happens the patient at the centre of it fades to the background while special interest groups take centre stage.
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28-06-2019, 22:52   #15
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The issue still gets used as a political football. A great shame. When this happens the patient at the centre of it fades to the background while special interest groups take centre stage.
Like war? Patient become collateral damage?
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