Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
13-02-2020, 13:32   #16
Candie
Registered User
 
Candie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 20,222
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerWolf View Post
Insurance is one of those things that is better to have and not need, than to need and not have.
Which is exactly what my Granny says about umbrellas. And my Granny is always right.
Candie is offline  
(2) thanks from:
Advertisement
13-02-2020, 13:39   #17
Raconteuse
Registered User
 
Raconteuse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 2,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerWolf View Post
Insurance is one of those things that is better to have and not need, than to need and not have.
Very well put.

Another thing I don't get is people asking what the point of a pension is. No consideration of the bigger picture at all.

Last edited by Raconteuse; 13-02-2020 at 14:07.
Raconteuse is offline  
13-02-2020, 13:44   #18
Charles Babbage
Registered User
 
Charles Babbage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 2,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stateofyou View Post
Some questions I have~
If we pay our PRSI, why should we also have to pay for private health service in order to get the best outcome?
Why are the waiting lists so long for public health services?
Are we not collecting enough tax to pay for excellent and timely public health services?
It seems to me it would be more cost effective to raise health taxes a bit for a better Public Health Service so we didn't have to pay privately on top of PRSI. Surely it would save people money if we all contributed a bit more?
Which other countries have more successful models and what tax rate do they pay?

You always hear Canadians talking about how great their system is, and how they get to focus on getting well instead of dealing with bills and insurance company squabbles + rules.

"Pre-existing conditions" rule is BULLSH*T. Why can't we legislate that the f-k out of our system? Even the Americans sorted that one out.
If you could just wait until you were sick and then take out insurance then the companies would quickly go bust or premiums would be exorbitant.
Charles Babbage is offline  
13-02-2020, 13:53   #19
Stateofyou
Registered User
 
Stateofyou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Babbage View Post
If you could just wait until you were sick and then take out insurance the companies would quickly go bust or premiums would be exorbitant.
What?
Why do we even have this system of a public/private + personal insurance at all. Insurance companies are making huge profits. We are also paying PRSI. Why don't we invest more in our public health system to make it as good as other countries who have this for their citizens. It makes no sense to me that we all pay PRSI for a half-baked health care system while also having to fork out extra money for private health care so to be seen to properly. While having to be at the mercy of insurance companies with regards to what they will/won't cover and the pre-existing conditions and wait time rules while they profit off our backs.

VHI Press release:
17th April 2019 - Vhi today announced details of its annual results for the year ending 31 December 2018. This has been another solid year for Vhi Group with the consolidated business reporting a net surplus of €82.4 million.
Stateofyou is offline  
Thanks from:
13-02-2020, 14:04   #20
byhookorbycrook
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 10,967
Up to around the age of 35, the only hospital I ever attended was to get my adenoids out as a child . I ran mini-marathons,,cycled , one - day evented with my horse. I was diagnosed with MS then and my world crumbled .
The treatment I’m on isn’t available in some public hospitals and cost 2.5 k per month . I have MRIs every 6 months at least .

I recently developed severe neck/ shoulder pain. Consultants prices as follows : €250, €180, €120 - I get 75% back on VHI with my plan . MRIs totally covered .
I also got admitted on the spot to a private hospital, where I shared a room with one other person. Contrast this to where a relation was in an 8 bed ward where the noise levels and hygiene were both questionable.

I’d give up most things before I’d give up VHI.
byhookorbycrook is offline  
Advertisement
13-02-2020, 14:35   #21
Squiggle
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Candie View Post
When you need it, you'll be glad you prioritized it. That's life, everything feels like a waste of money until you're in a position to appreciate how different things could have been. Like house insurance, I hope I never need it but it could possibly be a lifesaver if I do.
It's not really like house insurance though. If you don't have house insurance and your house burns down there's no backup.

If you have a heart attack and are brought to hospital in an ambulance you'll be treated irrespective of whether or not you have health insurance.
Squiggle is offline  
13-02-2020, 15:21   #22
byhookorbycrook
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 10,967
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squiggle View Post
It's not really like house insurance though. If you don't have house insurance and your house burns down there's no backup.

If you have a heart attack and are brought to hospital in an ambulance you'll be treated irrespective of whether or not you have health insurance.
Unless you happen to have it “ out of hours,” in Waterford hospital.
Even with VHI, there was an 18 month delay to see a neurologist in Dublin at the time I needed to find one .
byhookorbycrook is offline  
(2) thanks from:
13-02-2020, 15:34   #23
sbsquarepants
Registered User
 
sbsquarepants's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 11,139
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerWolf View Post
Insurance is one of those things that is better to have and not need, than to need and not have.
I don't disagree.

Dinner is an even more terrible thing to need and not have though!
sbsquarepants is offline  
13-02-2020, 16:02   #24
Bigus
Registered User
 
Bigus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 4,607
Quote:
Originally Posted by seamus View Post
You should pay your VHI before you pay your mortgage. One is more important than the other.
I give this same advice to people who ask , health insurance is worth more than anything when the need kicks in .
Even if you had the money to pay cash for procedures , protocols mean a lot of private healthcare won’t take non insured cash patients, but will happily let you jump the queue once you have even basic insurance which you can supplement with extra cash payments if necessary to get better rooms etc.

During the downturn I almost let my families VHI lapse along with many other monthly payments , except I met an elderly wise lady at a funeral who convinced me to reinstate it. Luckily I was within a week of the 3 month total lapse of the policy which meant benefits were totally reinstated immediately, instead of a 2 year probation on new policies. Amazingly the old lady’s wise words were proven correct only 6 months later , as my wife got serious cancer and just as she recovered 2 years later I was on deaths door with a problem that started similarly to the the ops reflux. Payout in my wife’s case was north of 65k and me about 27 k , our older kids also benefited to the tune of thousands on minor stuff.
We’re both good now and I’ve no doubt a lot of the reason we’re both alive and well is due to the rapid response, superior specialists, and quicker access to the latest equipment in the better funded and more importantly better managed private care in a brand new up to date hospital.

So in our case we got and get great value and VHI payments will always take precedence in this household over everything else if the things turn bad again.

Also the only healthcare over a lifetime worth having is the government backed VHI , no point in false economy I’m my opinion with the also rans who are in it to profit.
Bigus is offline  
Advertisement
13-02-2020, 18:25   #25
Ms2011
Registered User
 
Ms2011's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by byhookorbycrook View Post
Up to around the age of 35, the only hospital I ever attended was to get my adenoids out as a child . I ran mini-marathons,,cycled , one - day evented with my horse. I was diagnosed with MS then and my world crumbled .
The treatment I’m on isn’t available in some public hospitals and cost 2.5 k per month . I have MRIs every 6 months at least .

I recently developed severe neck/ shoulder pain. Consultants prices as follows : €250, €180, €120 - I get 75% back on VHI with my plan . MRIs totally covered .
I also got admitted on the spot to a private hospital, where I shared a room with one other person. Contrast this to where a relation was in an 8 bed ward where the noise levels and hygiene were both questionable.

I’d give up most things before I’d give up VHI.
I was the same, never had anything more than a cold until the age of 37, then boom, IBD landed on my doorstep.
Would have been waiting 8 months for scopes on the public system despite being so ill I ate no more than a mouthful or so of cereal for 10 weeks and lost 2 stone. I finally gave in and went private (paid out of my own pocket), was seen & treated in 2 weeks to the tune of €2,200 but I was on the road to recovery.
All that said what I paid is still equivalent to what I would have paid over the year/years in insurance premiums. I was able to claim 20% back so all in all it cost me €1,760.
Ms2011 is offline  
13-02-2020, 18:43   #26
Greyfox
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 2,234
It's not worth it, it's a waste of money for most people.
Greyfox is offline  
13-02-2020, 18:54   #27
Esel
Not your ornery onager
 
Esel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 18,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greyfox View Post
It's not worth it, it's a waste of money for most people.
Same for house insurance, because most houses don't burn down or get burgled?
Esel is offline  
(2) thanks from:
13-02-2020, 19:11   #28
joe40
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms2011 View Post
I was the same, never had anything more than a cold until the age of 37, then boom, IBD landed on my doorstep.
Would have been waiting 8 months for scopes on the public system despite being so ill I ate no more than a mouthful or so of cereal for 10 weeks and lost 2 stone. I finally gave in and went private (paid out of my own pocket), was seen & treated in 2 weeks to the tune of €2,200 but I was on the road to recovery.
All that said what I paid is still equivalent to what I would have paid over the year/years in insurance premiums. I was able to claim 20% back so all in all it cost me €1,760.
That's the sort of sums I do the cost of going private compared to health insurance. 10 years of premium s would get a lot of private care.
I do believe for things like cancer once you are in the system care is comparable, but thankfully I not experienced enough in our health system to have definite knowledgs. Wife and kids have health insurance, I don't.
joe40 is offline  
13-02-2020, 21:33   #29
Looptheloop30
Registered User
 
Looptheloop30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 60
In early 30s. How much benefit if any is there to the very basic packages, roughly 440 for the year? Is the main perk being that I would get seen much quicker if something did happen to go wrong?
Looptheloop30 is offline  
13-02-2020, 21:39   #30
salonfire
Registered User
 
salonfire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,341
PHI is very much worth it.

People should be lobbying for reduced funding to the public system and allow them pay less in tax to help pay for PHI.

All the public sector cheerleaders you find on Boards are the first to run to the private sector when it comes to Health. Ask yourself why that is.
salonfire is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet