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11-06-2019, 16:43   #1
Jams O Donnell
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My eldest has always had a bit of interest in astronmical events, and having read some of the coverage about it really wants to have a look at Jupiter while it's in opposition.

Assuming we have okay entry level equipment sorted, and that we'd drive into the Wicklow mountains (Laragh?) after midnight to do it, would it be worthwhile trying to observe at this time of year?
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11-06-2019, 21:31   #2
rolion
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Congrats and wish you lots of happy & clear skies...

Its summer and Sun light combined with light pollution may tamper the observation satisfaction.
This week,you have the Moon shining as well,so not so good observation condition.

Subject to weather,yes you can see it alright these times but a bit maybe too late in the night.
The best period is from 22nd of this month.And after midnight,a nice dark sky.
Jupiter is rising from East and no Moon. Saturn will be a delight to "touch" it with the naked eyes..

Download Stellarium and play with the "date and time" and see yourself best available period.
Same,check for the weather well in advance and patience as that may change many times across an hour.

Good luck, enjoy every bright star and light second timewith your son...
Will not be a bad ideea to say when you going there,we may be able to organise a "star party" type meeting with the families ...

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Last edited by rolion; 11-06-2019 at 22:11.
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11-06-2019, 22:47   #3
Iancar29
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You certainly don't have to drive to Wicklow to look at Jupiter as its visible from anywhere in the country under clear skies.
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12-06-2019, 10:00   #4
tjhook
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Planets like Jupiter are bright enough that travel to dark skies shouldn't be necessary.


Jupiter is low enough in the sky at the moment though - make sure your vantage point doesn't have obstacles to the South that will block your view.
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12-06-2019, 13:45   #5
Jams O Donnell
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Many thanks for the replies and good advice! I'm near the Dublin hills so will have to travel a bit to get a view of the southern horizon anyway. Any suggestions for suitable sites nearer to South Dublin/Wicklow foothills?
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12-06-2019, 19:12   #6
rolion
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Originally Posted by Jams O Donnell View Post
Many thanks for the replies and good advice! I'm near the Dublin hills so will have to travel a bit to get a view of the southern horizon anyway. Any suggestions for suitable sites nearer to South Dublin/Wicklow foothills?

H E R E
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12-06-2019, 20:05   #7
Jams O Donnell
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Excellent suggestion, thanks! I think we'll give this a try on Friday or Saturday, whichever is clearest.
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13-06-2019, 00:53   #8
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If I had a euro for every time someone suggested going up the Wicklow mountains ... I'd have several euro.

All you have to do is avoid light pollution and bad weather. What's with going up the mountains? Mountains produce crappy weather! The weather is almost ALWAYS better away from the mountains. Avoid being in the lee of the mountains too .... around the Arklow bypass is regularly crappy. All that said, obviously everyone knows that going up the mountains gets you closer to the stars ... by 0.000000000001%.

Proper observatories are on top of mountains to get above the cloud layer. Useful tip: we don't have any mountains like that in Ireland. But we have lots that make their own cloud layer and get you closer to, or even IN it.

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13-06-2019, 15:27   #9
Jams O Donnell
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If I had a euro for every time someone suggested going up the Wicklow mountains ... I'd have several euro.

All you have to do is avoid light pollution and bad weather. What's with going up the mountains? Mountains produce crappy weather! The weather is almost ALWAYS better away from the mountains. Avoid being in the lee of the mountains too .... around the Arklow bypass is regularly crappy. All that said, obviously everyone knows that going up the mountains gets you closer to the stars ... by 0.000000000001%.

Proper observatories are on top of mountains to get above the cloud layer. Useful tip: we don't have any mountains like that in Ireland. But we have lots that make their own cloud layer and get you closer to, or even IN it.
I just need a view of the southern horizon for this particular observation, and the mountains are directly to the south of me. Otherwise I wouldn't be going over or around them. But thanks.
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