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26-04-2019, 02:30   #301
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rules of anykind only work if a,,, the robot understands the, b.,, the robot has them programmed in,,, or c,, the humans who programmed the robot understand them.]
Algorithms competing with algorithms (i.e., self-learning) sometimes produce results not fully understood by humans, so say my programming friends. Most still laugh about Skynet, especially after a few beers.

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Debugging : The act of replacing known bugs with unknown bugs.
I enjoy your humour Capt'n.

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Still doesn't mean they get it right every time.
Plus... Deadline and cost overruns common. Quarterly and annual results rule in America. Beyond that, look to move to the competition for promotion, more pay, and benefits.
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29-04-2019, 20:31   #302
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Debugging : The act of replacing known bugs with unknown bugs.
Cool expression!
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08-05-2019, 01:17   #303
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surely that would be rebuggibg??debugging would be to secretly add the bugs
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08-05-2019, 21:15   #304
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surely that would be rebuggibg??debugging would be to secretly add the bugs
Once upon a time Grace Hooper removed a moth* from a relay in an electromechanical computer.

Bugs were known about long before then but it's a good tale.

Also it doesn't answer the question of what if there's a hardware fault or "unexpected item in fragging area ?"

A human has some chance of coping with the unexpected. An AI has really none unless it's been programmed in.




The history of the Nuclear industry shows that spending tens of billions still means the are failures in design and implementation. And we've been building nuclear reactors for 70 years.



Microsoft is a trillion dollar company. URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ELIZA"]Chatbot AI's have been around since 1966.[/URL]

50 years later Microsoft's latest AI chatbot was released on twitter.
They pulled it after just 16 hours. Because it couldn't handle the real world.


And then accidentally re-released it later on. Which doesn't set a good precedent.



AI is a Crapshoot.




* It was dead, a ghost in the machine ?
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09-05-2019, 01:36   #305
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Once upon a time Grace Hooper removed a moth* from a relay in an electromechanical computer.

Bugs were known about long before then but it's a good tale.

Also it doesn't answer the question of what if there's a hardware fault or "unexpected item in fragging area ?"

A human has some chance of coping with the unexpected. An AI has really none unless it's been programmed in.




The history of the Nuclear industry shows that spending tens of billions still means the are failures in design and implementation. And we've been building nuclear reactors for 70 years.



Microsoft is a trillion dollar company. URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ELIZA"]Chatbot AI's have been around since 1966.[/URL]

50 years later Microsoft's latest AI chatbot was released on twitter.
They pulled it after just 16 hours. Because it couldn't handle the real world.


And then accidentally re-released it later on. Which doesn't set a good precedent.



AI is a Crapshoot.




* It was dead, a ghost in the machine ?
hardware would be the easiest to mess up if you wanted to I suspect an armed robot would if told to do it keep on firing a weapon even if it had no ammo or anything like that that would be a huge hardware task that went wrong.
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09-05-2019, 10:45   #306
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AI is a Crapshoot.
Can we speak comparatively? How does AI compare to random variation, differential reproduction, and evolution? Similarities? Differences? AI now in its single cell stage today, and a primitive cell at that? Will cells combine as they evolve, with many early variations that are not fecund, but an extremely rare variation that becomes a fecund hybrid? Or perhaps these comments are just metaphorical nonsense?

Last edited by Black Swan; 09-05-2019 at 10:50.
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09-05-2019, 20:21   #307
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From dual to multiple competing algorithms? Survival of the killer algorithm. Herbert Spencer updated?
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09-05-2019, 22:17   #308
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Can we speak comparatively? How does AI compare to random variation, differential reproduction, and evolution? Similarities? Differences? AI now in its single cell stage today, and a primitive cell at that? Will cells combine as they evolve, with many early variations that are not fecund, but an extremely rare variation that becomes a fecund hybrid? Or perhaps these comments are just metaphorical nonsense?
No comparison, living organisms have had 4 billion years to learn the basics. And not just a handful , it's planet wide.

AI is still in it's infancy. Today's chat bot's have access to computers that the 1960's researchers could only have dreamed of. They are better than Eliza but not hugely better, it's like they have a better dictionary and a few more rules on grammar and not much else to show for 50 years of software and hardware development.
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12-05-2019, 00:24   #309
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From dual to multiple competing algorithms? Survival of the killer algorithm. Herbert Spencer updated?
Antagonistic learning between 2 algorithms occurs today. Not sure if more than two would result in greater efficiency and effectiveness.
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12-05-2019, 15:26   #310
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Antagonistic learning between 2 algorithms occurs today. Not sure if more than two would result in greater efficiency and effectiveness.
But how is it measured ?



You'd think that nuclear weapons would have had lots of safety features from day one and the rules and controls would be idiot and accident proof.

You'd be very wrong. There's a huge litany of near misses.

between the years 1950 and 1968, there were more than 1,000 accidents involving nuclear weapons.

Anyone who thinks this won't be repeated elsewhere only needs to look at Boeing 737 software.
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12-05-2019, 16:51   #311
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12-05-2019, 23:55   #312
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Anyone who thinks this won't be repeated elsewhere only needs to look at Boeing 737 software.
The Boeing 737 nods its nose up-and-down in agreement with you Capt'n.
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13-05-2019, 23:15   #313
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The Boeing 737 nods its nose up-and-down in agreement with you Capt'n.
Nodding for sure.
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16-05-2019, 21:53   #314
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What's the chance that tomorrow's killer robots may exhibit programming errors like those experienced by Boeing today. Will future killer robots be grounded after they run amuck? Reminded of Runaway (1984) starring Tom Selleck, whose policeman character is an expert in handling rogue machines.
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17-05-2019, 00:06   #315
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What's the chance that tomorrow's killer robots may exhibit programming errors like those experienced by Boeing today. Will future killer robots be grounded after they run amuck? Reminded of Runaway (1984) starring Tom Selleck, whose policeman character is an expert in handling rogue machines.
100%. It's just a matter of time given the almost complete lack of control.

NASA spend $1,000 per line of code. And purposefully use the most boring programmers possible. So it's bland predictable code that's supposed to work every time. And they still screw up.

AI and robots are sexy so it's the opposite type of code.
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