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11-08-2017, 00:45   #1
 
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Henry (name)

Any particular reason why a name like 'Henry' would be passed down from generation to generation? I've checked the lineage on my mothers side and it has been passed down at least 5 times.
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11-08-2017, 03:14   #2
Peregrinus
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Names run in families. There's no particular reason why "Henry" should run in a particular family, but there's no particular reason why it shouldn't. Given enough families, some of them will have "Henry" as a name that runs, and your mother's happens to be one of those families.
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11-08-2017, 08:52   #3
tac foley
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Just be happy the name isn't 'Nigel'.

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11-08-2017, 11:04   #4
pedroeibar1
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Any particular reason why a name like 'Henry' would be passed down from generation to generation? I've checked the lineage on my mothers side and it has been passed down at least 5 times.
There is a well-known and common naming pattern in Irish families, a clue used by genealogists for many years.
  • First born son named after his father's father
  • Second born son named after his mother's father
  • Third born son named after his father
  • Fourth born son named after his father's oldest brother
  • Fifth born son named after his father's 2nd oldest brother
    or his mother's oldest brother
  • First born daughter named after her mother's mother
  • Second born daughter named after her father's mother
  • Third born daughter named after her mother
  • Fourth born daughter named after her mother's oldest sister
  • Fifth born daughter named after her mother's 2nd oldest sister
    or her father's oldest sister
It is still used - particularly in rural districts - but has started to die out in cities, where Darren, Jade, etc., have taken over.
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11-08-2017, 12:30   #5
tabbey
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Henry was quite a common name in Ireland until the early twentieth century. It was found among both catholic and protestant families, but more so in the latter.

Although names ran in families as listed by Pedroeibar, practised to a greater or lesser degree, following independence there was an emergence of names such as Colm, Kevin, Ciaran etc, and some names perceived as more English than Irish, went into numerical decline.

Because the name Henry was associated with the reformation centuries previously, there may have been embarassment among the RC nationalist community in the mid 20th century about naming their new babies. There are very few boys born since 1950 in Ireland given the name Henry.

It is a pity, as tracking ancestors named Henry is a breath of fresh air, after plodding through numerous Johns, James, Thomas and Patricks.

William was also perceived as being associated with 1690, but there was safety in numbers. In Dublin and Ulster, it was more common than Patrick, and remains very common in Dublin especially.

Henry and George seem to be the main casualties of the independence era trend.
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11-08-2017, 12:36   #6
tabbey
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Another name which faded away even earlier was Tobias, or Toby.

Perusing the GRO indices, it was common enough, at least in some families, in 1864 births, but by the turn of the century was only found in the death registers.
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11-08-2017, 13:39   #7
tac foley
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Another name which faded away even earlier was Tobias, or Toby.

Perusing the GRO indices, it was common enough, at least in some families, in 1864 births, but by the turn of the century was only found in the death registers.
Not surprised, me. Of all the many gloopy names inflicted on baby boys, that has to be near the top of the pile.

The only Toby I ever met in my life was a total dwong, seemingly lacking sufficient brains to operate a spoon and breathe simultaneously.

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11-08-2017, 14:11   #8
Kalimah
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Having a name like Henry is great when it comes to tracing family trees. We had a Walter in ours born about 1820 - I've no idea where that might have come from.

On the other side going back from my grandfather there is Michael- Robert- Peter - Robert - Peter. I think with the exception of Michael, the rest were all eldest sons so the names were carried on through the generations. What was even better was that the 1821 census records for Cavan are still extant, so I got back to 1760 with very little effort.
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11-08-2017, 15:06   #9
tabbey
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We had a Walter in ours born about 1820 - I've no idea where that might have come from.
Walter was quite common in families with Norman ancestry, or areas in which Norman names were significant.
One of my ancestral lines had a few Walters.
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11-08-2017, 16:04   #10
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Walter was quite common in families with Norman ancestry, or areas in which Norman names were significant.
One of my ancestral lines had a few Walters.
I never thought of the Norman connection - thank you Tabbey! My lot were from Westmeath and Cavan. Our Walter was in the Westmeath family. I keep meaning to do a DNA analysis on myself some time soon to see if there is anything other than Irish in our genes.
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14-08-2017, 15:29   #11
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Maybe in the future genealogists will be ploughing through endless numbers of Jades, Britneys, Brandons, Reubens, Romeos, Paris's, Poppys etc., etc.
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14-08-2017, 16:25   #12
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Maybe in the future genealogists will be ploughing through endless numbers of Jades, Britneys, Brandons, Reubens, Romeos, Paris's, Poppys etc., etc.
Most of these names will never run in families, many are period related, based on celebrities or fictional characters.
Perhaps future genealogists will say ; Jason in Ireland - must have been born about 1980.
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14-08-2017, 16:27   #13
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Definitely John Paul for 1980.
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14-08-2017, 16:28   #14
VirginiaB
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How about Hugh? One of my Irish family lines is the Bruton family and they are full of the name Hugh. I have found at least three men named Hugh Bruton in mid-19c Manhattan, all of whom of course had sons named Hugh. I have always wondered who 'the' original Hugh Bruton was who made the name so revered among Irish Brutons. They mostly lived in Meath, Westmeath and Dublin.

Bruton is a place name in Somerset, England and one of their most prominent residents was, believe it or not, named Hugh Sexey. Was he the Hugh that launched a thousand Hugh Brutons?
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24-08-2017, 11:45   #15
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How about Hugh? One of my Irish family lines is the Bruton family and they are full of the name Hugh. I have found at least three men named Hugh Bruton in mid-19c Manhattan, all of whom of course had sons named Hugh. I have always wondered who 'the' original Hugh Bruton was who made the name so revered among Irish Brutons. They mostly lived in Meath, Westmeath and Dublin.

Bruton is a place name in Somerset, England and one of their most prominent residents was, believe it or not, named Hugh Sexey. Was he the Hugh that launched a thousand Hugh Brutons?
Hugh is the 'Interpretatio romana' for the irish language name Aodh, as a result it was hugely popular particularly given romantic nationalism views of Aodh Rua Ó Domhnaill and Aodh Ó Néill from the 19th century onwards.

Aodh itself was one of most popular surnames among medieval Irish.
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