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07-11-2016, 19:36   #61
Corca Baiscinn
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Great info here, thanks everybody who posted! Beertons , When you mention your logstore which holds 3 cubic metres, could you elaborate? Is it one of those open sided affairs where you stack the logs but they are exposed to the air or a mini shed or like a coal bunker or what? I've been thinking of getting something but small garden and hard to know where to find space between windows/pipes on back wall and diagonal rain hitting some others!
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07-11-2016, 19:52   #62
ablelocks
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No it's Ecofirewood.eu for €209

You can't compare firewood by weight only by volume and secondly how it's packaged. The crates are stacked so have a lot more wood than wood thrown into a 1m bag.

The country products listing is rounded to a metre. It's the same volume as best logs.

Wet firewood will be very heavy but useless for burning.
coop stores is the same - 1m3 crate, stacked beech.

that ecofirewood then is currently the best value

edit : am I correct in thinking that beech and oak are longer burning than Ash? What about birch?
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07-11-2016, 20:01   #63
 
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coop stores is the same - 1m3 crate, stacked beech.

that ecofirewood then is currently the best value

edit : am I correct in thinking that beech and oak are longer burning than Ash? What about birch?
I think ash beech and oak are very similar in terms of energy. Birch is a bit less.

I have not burned beech but always go with ash now as I find oak is very "splintery" so is a bit of a pain to handle with bare hands and a bit messier in the house.
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07-11-2016, 20:17   #64
beertons
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Originally Posted by Corca Baiscinn View Post
Great info here, thanks everybody who posted! Beertons , When you mention your logstore which holds 3 cubic metres, could you elaborate? Is it one of those open sided affairs where you stack the logs but they are exposed to the air or a mini shed or like a coal bunker or what? I've been thinking of getting something but small garden and hard to know where to find space between windows/pipes on back wall and diagonal rain hitting some others!
Log store dot ie is who I got it off. Saw it at a Christmas fair, it was too late to order then, but I told him I'd give him a shout in 6 months. Made to what ever measurements you'd like. It's a great job. Exposed on 3 sides.
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08-11-2016, 16:22   #65
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Those log stores are nice, but a bit Expensive
Easy enough to make, Use 1.5 x 1.5 Pressure treated timber, for frame and racks, roof needs to slope, roof WBP Water based ply, covered with mineral felt. If you can attach to a wall, will disguise an ugly wall, and will be supported better.
From a height POV make sure roof does not project where your head is or you will bump head a lot.
Try not to build too far from house, as a basket of wood is heavy. Done properly with wood stacked neatly , will add to a garden. Ideal situation in a sunny location, aids drying

An easier, cheaper but less attractive roof, can be made 10mm corriboard

Last edited by k123456; 08-11-2016 at 17:21.
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08-11-2016, 17:06   #66
Corca Baiscinn
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Thanks k12456, I could acquire all that, apart from the sunny garden! It's a garden that would be attractive to a flock of ducks today! Still a useful idea though for inside wall of a shed, minus pitched roof, as a way of keeping the timber neat and not taking up the whole space.
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08-11-2016, 18:34   #67
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Moot point, but if your basket of wood is heavy, its not dry. A basket of bone-dry wood should weigh a lot less than 10kg
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04-09-2017, 15:22   #68
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that time of year again - just bumping this in case anyone has any bargain alerts on firewood over the next few months
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04-09-2017, 20:42   #69
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that time of year again - just bumping this in case anyone has any bargain alerts on firewood over the next few months
Loads of lads selling logs on donedeal. Where are you based?
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20-10-2017, 15:18   #70
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400kg kiln dried from topline = 179 euro. only available in-store though and not sure what they charge for delivery - probably varies from store to store
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21-10-2017, 06:59   #71
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I was speaking to a well experienced man when it comes to fires, he fits and supplies stoves, has been called into court to give expert opinion on cases etc.

Anyway, he said there's no real need to buy kiln dried wood. That as long as it's seasoned, which can be done in Ireland by simply stacking wood in the open air for about a year, that it's no real difference and you're basically paying companies to do a drying process and get the moisture content down with no real benefit over regular seasoned wood.

Thoughts?
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21-10-2017, 07:49   #72
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I was speaking to a well experienced man when it comes to fires, he fits and supplies stoves, has been called into court to give expert opinion on cases etc.

Anyway, he said there's no real need to buy kiln dried wood. That as long as it's seasoned, which can be done in Ireland by simply stacking wood in the open air for about a year, that it's no real difference and you're basically paying companies to do a drying process and get the moisture content down with no real benefit over regular seasoned wood.

Thoughts?
I agree. I cut split and stack my firewood outside with a cover but open to the prevailing winds and can get it down to 15% moisture content. I try to bring it inside a shed during a warm period in September but this year it was the first week in October.

I have found that it is much harder to dry hardwood to under 20% than softwood. Softwood will dry in one year. If I split and stack it from now to January it will be ready for next winter but I've found that the hardwood takes two summers to dry and even then some oak, blackthorn and hawthorn rounds will still be over 20%. I try to mix the wood when burning to even this out. I do split my wood fairly big as I have a big firebox so that effects it as well.

I think that those crates of kiln dried firewood are vastly overpriced but most of the firewood I see being sold is not even close to being properly air dried so maybe that's why people buy them.

People who have bought wet firewood before and switch to kiln dried will say there's a massive difference 🙂

Last edited by TTTT; 21-10-2017 at 07:57.
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21-10-2017, 10:01   #73
ablelocks
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with the kiln dried, you're fairly confident that it will be dry - many people don't have their own wood source or storage, so it's convenient as much as anything else. edit - also, because the logs are big, once the heat was built up in the stove, we only had to use 1 log at a time in the stove (beech that was, soft woods burn faster).

There's so much ****e out there that claims to be air dried but when you pick up a log they're like bricks in weight.

I haven't had to buy in wood for 2 years thanks to some tree felling after the big storm of 3 years ago - i have a moisture-ometer and like TTTT, let it air dry in an open shed. Air dried is just as good as kiln dried if you have the patience and the facilities to wait. If not, get a moisture reader to check any wood before you buy it...

Last edited by ablelocks; 21-10-2017 at 10:17.
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21-10-2017, 10:06   #74
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I was stuck for some wood yesterday and got a couple of bags of the stafford kiln dried timber from woodies (it looks like pine to me so not hard wood).Some of the logs ended up being close to 20% moisture content when i tested them and actually seemed to have mould on them. They'll still be fine to burn I'm sure but a bit annoying when you're paying 9 euro for a relatively small bag.

I'd love to get a crate of kiln dried or decent air dried wood but storage is a real headache when you live in a 3 bed semi.
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21-10-2017, 12:48   #75
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I'd love to get a crate of kiln dried or decent air dried wood but storage is a real headache when you live in a 3 bed semi.
A lot of places sell log stores which don't take up much space. I got this one https://bestlogs.ie/shop/log-storage-cabin/

The larger one holds more than a cubic metre crate and the crate can be chopped up for kindling.
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