Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
15-01-2021, 10:34   #46
budgemook
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,453
Hi, I hope it's okay to resurrect this thread. There is some great information in here about frying pans - I guess the summary would be:

* Non-stick - buy cheap as you can (while looking for quality of course) as the non-stick will come off no matter how much is paid.
* Stainless steel pans - apparently can be seasoned and could be an alternative to cast iron. Probably not for me though as I have a good enamel one.
* Cast Iron - lasts a lifetime and can be non-stick if looked after properly - season, rub with oil after use, dry properly and don't use soap etc.

So I am planning to upgrade my cast iron pan - it was a bad buy as there are way to many griddles on it making it very difficult to clean. It's gathering rust in the shed now and I'll probably just bin it. I am going to get a flat cast iron pan and really look after it this time.

I see nisbets have some for under 30 euros - does anyone have experience with these? I was also looking at some that have enamel on the outside - I think this could be a good option as the outside won't rust and I'd only need to worry about the inside. Might be cleaner to store too as I wouldn't be rubbing the outside with oil.

Finally - I came across this spun iron pan that is apparently excellent - all of the benefits of cast iron but much lighter. Does anyone have one? It's a crowd in the UK that does them, they are sold out until March!

https://www.netherton-foundry.co.uk/...wo-handled-pan

So right now I am torn between a) cheap nisbets pan b) expensive enamel coated pan and c) this spun iron pan.

Suggestions very welcome!
budgemook is offline  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
15-01-2021, 11:11   #47
stimpson
Registered User
 
stimpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,451
One issue with CastIron is it doesn't spread heat well, so you need a good heavy pan to ensure you have enough thermal mass, hence I'd be sceptical of the spun iron pans - plus they are super expensive.

I have stopped using my griddle pans. The marks look great, but it means less meat has ben in contact with the pan, so less Maillard reaction, so less flavour.

If you're in the market for pans, I have some that were due to go on adverts. Some no name, some Amazon essentials and a good 12" Lodge. PM if you're interested.
stimpson is offline  
Thanks from:
15-01-2021, 11:16   #48
the beer revolu
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 12,841
Couple of things.
I have a set of really cheap cast iron pans - been using them for decades. I don't see the point of paying loads for premium brands.

Griddle pans are a pita, smoke fest.

I always use soap when cleaning them - it doesn't take off the seasoning. Just don't scour them.

I rarely oil my pans - just no need. I'd dry them well on the hob after washing.

Getting them well seasoned is key.
the beer revolu is offline  
(2) thanks from:
15-01-2021, 11:26   #49
budgemook
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,453
Quote:
Originally Posted by stimpson View Post
One issue with CastIron is it doesn't spread heat well, so you need a good heavy pan to ensure you have enough thermal mass, hence I'd be sceptical of the spun iron pans - plus they are super expensive.

I have stopped using my griddle pans. The marks look great, but it means less meat has ben in contact with the pan, so less Maillard reaction, so less flavour.

If you're in the market for pans, I have some that were due to go on adverts. Some no name, some Amazon essentials and a good 12" Lodge. PM if you're interested.
Thanks, I'll have a think about it! Yeah the whole "lightweight" thing would make me doubtful but the BBC reckon these things are the bees knees!
Quote:
Originally Posted by the beer revolu View Post
Couple of things.
I have a set of really cheap cast iron pans - been using them for decades. I don't see the point of paying loads for premium brands.

Griddle pans are a pita, smoke fest.

I always use soap when cleaning them - it doesn't take off the seasoning. Just don't scour them.

I rarely oil my pans - just no need. I'd dry them well on the hob after washing.

Getting them well seasoned is key.
Yeah, smoke fest is exactly right. It was a bad buy but wasn't expensive at least. I also have a cast iron plate for my bbq - I seasoned it when I got it but it has rusted too. I was told before to oil it after use and it won't rust but maybe it's something else causing the rust there. Anyway, when I get a new pan I'll grind the rust off the bbq plate and season them together and just look after them a bit better.
budgemook is offline  
15-01-2021, 11:57   #50
stimpson
Registered User
 
stimpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,451
Soap used to be a problem because it contained lye - thats not the case with fairly liquid. I use it all the time with mine and even leave them to soak - once it has been well seasoned it would be 100%.

Ley is basically Oven Cleaner. You can use it to completely strip the pan back to bare metal if you want to begin from scratch. use one of the ones from Dealz that comes with a plastic bag. This will remove rust too - DO NOT GRIND THE RUST OFF - you will ruin the surface.

The key thing here is seasoned properly. I have tried all sorts of methods and oils. My go-to now is:

- grapeseed (not rapeseed) oil. Tesco sell 500ml bottles. Also great for high temp frying!
- preheat oven to max
- wash and dry the pan
- Stick it on the hob and get it good and hot.
- Switch on the extractor
- get 2 paper towels and fold each in 4
- apply a small amount of oil to one towel (literally towel on top of bottle and briefly upend it to apply the smallest amount of oil to it)
- while it's still on the hob lightly rub it around the bottom of the pan. Literally 3 or 4 light swipes - no need to cover everything
- take the dry towel and remove as much excess oil as you can
- give it a minute or two to smoke off
- repeat this for at least 10 minutes
- cover the rest of the pan in as little oil as you can, removing the excess with a dry towel
- put it in the oven for 15 mins
- repeat this 2 or 3 times.

Bam! Bulletproof seasoning.
stimpson is offline  
(3) thanks from:
Advertisement
15-01-2021, 12:04   #51
the beer revolu
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 12,841
Cast iron will rust in humid conditions.
If dried really well and kept in the kitchen, it shouldn't rust.
the beer revolu is offline  
Thanks from:
15-01-2021, 12:21   #52
budgemook
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,453
Quote:
Originally Posted by the beer revolu View Post
Cast iron will rust in humid conditions.
If dried really well and kept in the kitchen, it shouldn't rust.
Fair enough - but if I want to keep the bbq attachment in the shed then I think it should be oiled to keep the humidity off.
budgemook is offline  
15-01-2021, 13:47   #53
the beer revolu
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 12,841
Quote:
Originally Posted by budgemook View Post
Fair enough - but if I want to keep the bbq attachment in the shed then I think it should be oiled to keep the humidity off.
Definitely oil it if keeping in shed.

Also, after oiling a pan, it's not really greasy, as such. A light rub of oil kinda soaks in.
the beer revolu is offline  
Thanks from:
15-01-2021, 22:07   #54
L1011
Moderator
 
L1011's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by budgemook View Post
* Stainless steel pans - apparently can be seasoned and could be an alternative to cast iron. Probably not for me though as I have a good enamel one.
It's not easy to season stainless steel nor is there much point - people use it to generate fond and you can just scrub it off without damage.

Its carbon steel - a fourth type of pan - that people usually season instead of cast iron.
L1011 is online now  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
16-01-2021, 10:51   #55
Planet X
Registered User
 
Planet X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,473
Bought two Lodge cast iron skillets last year.
Should have bought them 20-30 years ago.

Pure non stick, nothing to worry about. It will also brown meat much better than other pans as it will get hotter and hold the heat.

I spent the guts of an hour though with an electric sander when bought first, then hand sanded it.
Next was a seasoning session or three. But.....when it's done, it's......
Planet X is online now  
Thanks from:
16-01-2021, 11:05   #56
the beer revolu
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 12,841
To be honest, in my biggest and most used cast iron pan the seasoning is pretty rough and chipped but it doesn't bother me as it's generally used just for searing meat.
I know I could sand it down and start again but there's, literally years of seasoning chipping and reforming and gaining character in that pan - I don't need it to be super non stick.
The smaller, less used ones are still smooth.

My well seasoned old wok has a teflon like surface.
the beer revolu is offline  
Thanks from:
16-01-2021, 18:22   #57
budgemook
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,453
Never heard of sanding down a new pan before. I ordered one from nisbets yesterday and it arrived today - great service. It’s a little bumpy for sure but I can’t see myself sanding it.

Today I cleaned / removed rust on my bbq grill plate and this burger press I have, tomorrow I’ll season everything.

The grill plate I have - there is still some light rust on the underside (the griddle size), more of an orange tint than actual rust. Will I be okay to season on top of that or do I need to remove it fully? Will the seasoning on top of the light rust stop it from rusting further does anyone know?
budgemook is offline  
17-01-2021, 08:33   #58
Planet X
Registered User
 
Planet X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,473
When cast iron is sanded down and seasoned correctly.......an egg will slide all over it

Whatever suits....
Planet X is online now  
Thanks from:
17-01-2021, 09:42   #59
the beer revolu
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 12,841
Quote:
Originally Posted by budgemook View Post

The grill plate I have - there is still some light rust on the underside (the griddle size), more of an orange tint than actual rust. Will I be okay to season on top of that or do I need to remove it fully? Will the seasoning on top of the light rust stop it from rusting further does anyone know?
That'll be fine. Once you get some oil on it, the rust will seem to disappear.
To a degree, the seasoning will prevent rust but oil it for storage if it's damp or humid.
the beer revolu is offline  
Thanks from:
17-01-2021, 14:59   #60
budgemook
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,453
Quote:
Originally Posted by the beer revolu View Post
My well seasoned old wok has a teflon like surface.
What is your wok made of?
budgemook is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet