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13-08-2013, 12:08   #31
 
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Is the station still derelict?
Last time I was talking to someone on that subject a few months ago, it was still in that state.
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13-08-2013, 12:09   #32
 
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The apartments on the platform are an abomination too - a relic of Celtic Tiger madness.
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13-08-2013, 12:36   #33
tac foley
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If any of you are above in the north at anytime, a visit to the Ulster Museum of Transport is always good craic.

tac
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14-08-2013, 15:25   #34
nuac
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Is the station still derelict?
Yes, but I understand plans are afoot to renovate it
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14-08-2013, 15:28   #35
 
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If any of you are above in the north at anytime, a visit to the Ulster Museum of Transport is always good craic.

tac
It's good, albeit they could have made it a bit bigger. Awfully cramped compared to the likes of NRM York.
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14-08-2013, 19:23   #36
 
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It's good, albeit they could have made it a bit bigger. Awfully cramped compared to the likes of NRM York.
Still, it's a bit better than our National Transport Museum.

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15-08-2013, 09:54   #37
jonniebgood1
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Its a running theme in certain aspects of Irish heritage that preservation of same in Ireland leaves a lot to be desired. What do people posting here who have an interest in these things think is the reason for this. I mean specific reasons rather than a moanfest by the way...

I am unsure but I wonder is it some type of link to the colonial nature of some of the heritage infrastructure- The big house was a plantation instrument in Ireland, something to be feared. The same houses in England for example were pillars in their communities in most cases, patrons to local trades and workers. Its a very different perspective for what can sometimes be seen as the same situation. The railways similar, they could be seen as a sign of colonial development in Ireland whereas they are seen as industrial development elsewhere.

Any one got ideas on this?
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15-08-2013, 10:17   #38
 
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Originally Posted by jonniebgood1 View Post
Its a running theme in certain aspects of Irish heritage that preservation of same in Ireland leaves a lot to be desired. What do people posting here who have an interest in these things think is the reason for this. I mean specific reasons rather than a moanfest by the way...

I am unsure but I wonder is it some type of link to the colonial nature of some of the heritage infrastructure- The big house was a plantation instrument in Ireland, something to be feared. The same houses in England for example were pillars in their communities in most cases, patrons to local trades and workers. Its a very different perspective for what can sometimes be seen as the same situation. The railways similar, they could be seen as a sign of colonial development in Ireland whereas they are seen as industrial development elsewhere.

Any one got ideas on this?
I don't think it was any immediate association with Britain per se is the reason, it's just that Irish people in general seem to have little interest in built or industrial heritage, and if they do, they don't put their money where their mouth is or roll up sleeves and muck in. Volunteerism and altruism in heritage is very much to the fore in the uk. I think railway preservation may be a perculiarly English trait, they do it best after all. I doubt if many of the Little Trains of Wales (nowadays a major tourist attraction) would have survived if it wasn't for a number of quite mad English people with time and money to spare.

Add to that the much smaller population here, transport heritage is very much a niche part of the overall scene.

Also, there was a number of infant and developing preservation schemes in this country that collapsed, for reasons that I won't go into that would take a full scale epic novel to cover that left a bad taste in many mouths.

Some may moan and complain that Irish Rail/CIE should do more...all they should do is facilitate, where possible, preservation efforts by suitable outside groups. Let IR/CIE concentrate on running a modern transport system.

Last edited by gobnaitolunacy; 15-08-2013 at 10:30.
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