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19-05-2012, 01:33   #31
dubhthach
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Originally Posted by tac foley View Post
'Foley' is said to have been derived from the Old Irish 'foghláda/foghládha - 'raider' or 'plunderer' - a clear pointer to Viking/Norse/Danish inroaders.

And of course, we must not overlook the present US president - Bairác Ó Bamheadhe.

tac
Foley can also be from Mac SEARRAIGH

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Mac SEARRAIGH—IV—M'Sharrie, MacSharry, MacSherry, Sharry, Sherry, and, by translation, Feley, Foley; 'son of Searrach' (foal, flighty); an old Breifney surname; found in the 16th century in Leitrim, Cavan and Sligo, where it is still common; now also in Armagh and Donegal. There was also a family of the name in Co. Down which cannot now be traced unless changed to Ó Searraigh (which see), which is not improbable. Searrach signifies a foal, hence the translated forms Feley (Filly) and Foley, the latter common about the town of Sligo.
of course the only way to prove scandinavian origins would be to do a Y-Chromosome test. Generally there quite different proportions of Haplogroups (sub-groups of Y) in Scandinavia then in Ireland.
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19-05-2012, 01:37   #32
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Originally Posted by Cork boy 55 View Post
How many people in the USA have an O'x in their surname?
it seems to be very few, Although characters with o'x names do seem tp appear in many hollywood movies.
Well alot of people in Ireland actually dropped the O' in the 19th century. Result of course is that often it was readopted in the early 20th century.

Problem with this is there are several incidences where the wrong "prefix" was appended. For example in west of Ireland there is Ó Carthaigh (O'Carthy) which is generally just "Carthy" these days. However some of these changed their name to MacCarthy (Mac Carthaigh). They are seperate surnames.

Some names generally have completely dropped the Ó/Mac in their english form. For example O'Duffy is very rare compared to Duffy (Ó Dubhthaigh) though not unknown.
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19-05-2012, 05:20   #33
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about 2% of the population report scots irish, but in states like georgia where american is the biggest reported ancestry a lot of them are scots irish but since they have been there so long dont identify with it
But they do.

You'd be surprised how aware many Americans are of their ancestry. From what I have witnessed, this knowledge tends to travel down through generations. There is often a greater hunger to know where one is from. Perhaps because everyone came from somewhere else?
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19-05-2012, 08:47   #34
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Originally Posted by dubhthach View Post
Foley can also be from Mac SEARRAIGH
of course the only way to prove scandinavian origins would be to do a Y-Chromosome test. Generally there quite different proportions of Haplogroups (sub-groups of Y) in Scandinavia then in Ireland.
Next time I have a look at my chromosomes I'll be sure to pay more attention.

A little 'Y-shaped' thingy, you say?

tac
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19-05-2012, 11:25   #35
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Well alot of people in Ireland actually dropped the O' in the 19th century. Result of course is that often it was readopted in the early 20th century.

Problem with this is there are several incidences where the wrong "prefix" was appended. For example in west of Ireland there is Ó Carthaigh (O'Carthy) which is generally just "Carthy" these days. However some of these changed their name to MacCarthy (Mac Carthaigh). They are seperate surnames.

Some names generally have completely dropped the Ó/Mac in their english form. For example O'Duffy is very rare compared to Duffy (Ó Dubhthaigh) though not unknown.
You have the surname Connor in Galway who aren't O'Connor at all but actually McConnor by rights.
Another couple of unusual names that are probably Gaelic but mightn't look it Earner=Seery and Stiffe=Ó Roighin.
You might know this Dubhthach. The Ryans of Tipp aren't Ryans at all but Mulryans. That true?

Éamonn an Chnoic/ Ned of the Hill was Éamonn Ó Maolriain and not Ryan as he is often named.
Is mise
Cormac Ó Comhraí
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19-05-2012, 12:32   #36
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Indeed well one of processes that often occur was the "attraction" of one surname to another. You would end up with an intermediate name in between. A good example is in Mayo:

Ó DOITHE -> O'Diff (Dohie as well) -> Duffy (in reality Ó Dubhthaigh)

The uncommon anglisced name O'Diff got "attracted" to the much more common Duffy (at least one sept of which in Roscommon).

With regards to Ryan there are at least three seperate surnames (taken from Woulfe 1923)

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Ó RIAGHAIN, Ó RIAIN—I—O Rian, O'Ryan, Ryan: 'descendant of Riaghan,' or 'Rian'; the name of a Carlow family who were lords of Uí Dróna, the present barony of Idrone, and are now numerous through Leinster; to be distinguished from Ó Maoilriain of Munster and Ó Ruaidhín of Connacht, which are both now incorrectly anglicised O'Ryan or Ryan.
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Ó MAOILRIAGHAIN, Ó MAOILRIAIN—I—O Mulrigan, O Mulryan, O Mulrean, Mulryan, Mulroyan, Mulryne, Mulrine, Mulrain, O'Ryan, Ryan; 'descendant of Maolriain' (follower of Riaghan or Rian); the name of a family of Leinster origin who settled in the 13th or 14th century in Uaithne-tire and Uaithne-cliach, now the baronies of Owney, in Co. Tipperary, and Owneybeg, in the east of Co. Limerick, where they became very numerous and powerful. In 1610, William Ryan surrendered to the. king all his landed property and all his rights of or in the barony of Owney O Mulrian, and received them back by letters patent. The family property was, however, lost in the confiscations of the 17th century. There are many very respectable families of the name in Tipperary and Limerick, and the name itself is very common in these counties. It is to be distinguished from Ó Riain, which see.
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Ó RUAIDHÍN—I—O Ruyne, O Royn, O Roen, Rouine, Royan, Rowen, (Ruane, O'Ryan, Ryan); 'descendant of Ruaidhín' (diminutive of ruadh, red); the same as Ó Ruadháin, which see, both forms being used by the same family, and equally common in Connacht. Some of the name have been long settled in Leinster.
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19-05-2012, 18:04   #37
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Ah de Bhuilbh. If I ever go on a cruise I'm going to bring itself, Dineen and Joyce's placenames with me in case I get shipwrecked.
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19-05-2012, 19:13   #38
 
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How many irish people (% wise) have an O' in their surname?
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22-05-2012, 02:40   #39
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How many irish people (% wise) have an O' in their surname?
Including surnames that in Irish have Ó? The vast majority. I have nothing to back that up, hence me adding the Irish names to be safe.

Last edited by conor.hogan.2; 22-05-2012 at 02:44.
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29-05-2012, 21:03   #40
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Remember too that reported ancestry ebbs and flows like fashion. In 1980 far more Americans put down English as their primary ancestry than did so in 2000 or 2010. This could be for a number of reasons, perhaps the genealogy industry's development over time has revealed unknown ancestries to people who assumed they were English transplants to America. I suspect though it just became more fashionable to select the Irish or German part of one's heritage than the English.
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01-06-2012, 18:56   #41
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How many irish people (% wise) have an O' in their surname?
check the phone book!
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02-06-2012, 02:19   #42
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Remember too that reported ancestry ebbs and flows like fashion. In 1980 far more Americans put down English as their primary ancestry than did so in 2000 or 2010. This could be for a number of reasons, perhaps the genealogy industry's development over time has revealed unknown ancestries to people who assumed they were English transplants to America. I suspect though it just became more fashionable to select the Irish or German part of one's heritage than the English.
I think your last line nailed it. I don't know that there's a more popular heritage to have in the United States right now.

And that has it's pros and cons. On one hand, it's great that so many people are embracing their family history. On the other hand, you have a lot of people running around in green, drinking Guinness, and talking up how Irish they are when really they're just Americans playing dress-up. I've always shied away from that. I'm proud of my Irish heritage because I love my grandparents, but I'm an American. Nothing wrong with that.

The title of this thread caught me by surprise though. I grew up just outside Philadelphia and still live in the area, and Irish surnames are everywhere.
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02-06-2012, 09:53   #43
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I think your last line nailed it. I don't know that there's a more popular heritage to have in the United States right now.

And that has it's pros and cons. On one hand, it's great that so many people are embracing their family history. On the other hand, you have a lot of people running around in green, drinking Guinness, and talking up how Irish they are when really they're just Americans playing dress-up. I've always shied away from that. I'm proud of my Irish heritage because I love my grandparents, but I'm an American. Nothing wrong with that.

The title of this thread caught me by surprise though. I grew up just outside Philadelphia and still live in the area, and Irish surnames are everywhere.
To be fair Irish people delight in stories of the silly American looking for a leprechaun etc. and there are plenty of them but there are areas of London, Boston etc. that are very Irish and it's possible to come from those areas and basically be Irish. There's a tendency among some in Ireland to ignore that or to denigrate it. I've friends who are London-Irish and you couldn't describe them as English. One of them bascially only knew ethnically Irish or West Indian people growing up. When I was in college in Galway a lot of Irish-Americans used to come and spend a year there. I found a few of them a lot more knowledgeable about certain aspects of Irish culture than a lot of the native born people. A few of them had a good knowledge of the North, one of them knew his family tree inside out (to the extent of knowing the villages going back generations) another had a very good knowledge of folklore of his parents' part of southeast Galway. I remember him arguing one time with someone, a local, who was telling him that the Irish language died out in the part of E. Galway a thousand years ago and our boy knowing when the last native speakers died out.
I've heard a great story about Newfoundland/ Nova Scotia from a couple of generations back about a young fella arriving into school and being asked for his home address and giving his home address as a certain townland in Wexford from which his ancestors emigrated four or five generations before. The accent from that part of Wexford is hilarious to anyone who knows the Wexford accent
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02-06-2012, 12:55   #44
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To be fair Irish people delight in stories of the silly American looking for a leprechaun etc. and there are plenty of them but there are areas of London, Boston etc. that are very Irish and it's possible to come from those areas and basically be Irish. There's a tendency among some in Ireland to ignore that or to denigrate it. I've friends who are London-Irish and you couldn't describe them as English. One of them bascially only knew ethnically Irish or West Indian people growing up. When I was in college in Galway a lot of Irish-Americans used to come and spend a year there. I found a few of them a lot more knowledgeable about certain aspects of Irish culture than a lot of the native born people. A few of them had a good knowledge of the North, one of them knew his family tree inside out (to the extent of knowing the villages going back generations) another had a very good knowledge of folklore of his parents' part of southeast Galway. I remember him arguing one time with someone, a local, who was telling him that the Irish language died out in the part of E. Galway a thousand years ago and our boy knowing when the last native speakers died out.
I've heard a great story about Newfoundland/ Nova Scotia from a couple of generations back about a young fella arriving into school and being asked for his home address and giving his home address as a certain townland in Wexford from which his ancestors emigrated four or five generations before. The accent from that part of Wexford is hilarious to anyone who knows the Wexford accent
Sure, there are plenty of us that really care and put in the extra effort to learn about and appreciate Ireland. But we'll be sitting quietly in the background while the stereotypical tourists plow their way through the country giving us a bad name.

...and ordering "black and tans" in every pub.
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02-06-2012, 13:52   #45
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I thought the Black and Tan was a Nike runner
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