Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
02-12-2013, 14:36   #46
looksee
Moderator
Jellybaby, these were on my children's copies (yes, I am the same vintage as you! :-)) There was a map of europe, very scruffily drawn. One day we tried to work out where all the countries were and as far as I can remember they had lost Austria, and various other countries were deformed. It was on copies for years, all the time my children were in primary!
looksee is offline  
Advertisement
02-12-2013, 14:41   #47
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 6,981
Quote:
Originally Posted by looksee View Post
Jellybaby, these were on my children's copies (yes, I am the same vintage as you! :-)) There was a map of europe, very scruffily drawn. One day we tried to work out where all the countries were and as far as I can remember they had lost Austria, and various other countries were deformed. It was on copies for years, all the time my children were in primary!
Aw Looksee, I love being a 'vintage', like cars and wine. Much nicer than being just 'old'. I doubt I would have looked that closely at the map anyway - clever you for finding the error.
Jellybaby1 is offline  
02-12-2013, 19:53   #48
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 6,981
Quote:
Originally Posted by byhookorbycrook View Post
All in The Cooking
Soundings
Jímín

For the love of heaven, I must have everything in my house! I didn't use it in school. I bought it in Eason's because it looked like a good sensible cookery book.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf All In The Cooking.pdf (1.03 MB, 92 views)
Jellybaby1 is offline  
(2) thanks from:
02-12-2013, 21:16   #49
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jellybaby1 View Post
For the love of heaven, I must have everything in my house! I didn't use it in school. I bought it in Eason's because it looked like a good sensible cookery book.
"All in the cooking"!!! That brings me back. We did cooking in primary school - also laundry skills, kitchen hygiene, knitting, sewing, - no wonder I'm a domestic goddess. (we had the nuns of course!)
One thing I remember about several of my schoolbooks is the clear way the information was presented. In particular the geology book we had for leaving cert - can't rem the name, also our Irish grammer book - they were really simple and well laid out with just the amount of information you needed about the subject. My kids' secondary books on the other hand seemed to be full of "filler" with lots of colour pics but not half as useful.
Molly007 is offline  
09-06-2014, 11:24   #50
westman1
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 353
I remember the book to which you refer: Ecouter et Parler. My experience of it was from 1981 to 1983. French through Irish edition. Can anyone advise on where I might source a copy? English/French edition I can find no problem but would really like to get Irish/French edition. Maybe its nostalgia or old age but even though I gave up French as a subject after my Inter Cert, I still retain the basic structure taught to me by the nemesis of my secondary school years and bizarrely find myself remembering (with fondness!!?) the grilling I got daily from her. Obviously something must have seeped in and lodged in my angst ridden, teenage brain. Go figure! Anyhow, would appreciate any help in my search for same: Ecouter et Parler (Irish/French Edition).
westman1 is offline  
Advertisement
27-09-2018, 16:33   #51
Noggle
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 130
There was an excellent prose book at one point for the LC English. It had Hazlitt, Bacon, Stevenson and Charles Lamb, I'd love to get a copy of it.
Noggle is offline  
27-09-2018, 18:54   #52
spurious
Category Moderator
 
spurious's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noggle View Post
There was an excellent prose book at one point for the LC English. It had Hazlitt, Bacon, Stevenson and Charles Lamb, I'd love to get a copy of it.
I know it seems like LC compared to today's stuff, but I think that was for Inter. cert.. I think I have it somewhere. I remember an essay on Superannuation.
Exploring English 2.

edit**
CUCINA refers to it in this post in this thread.

Last edited by spurious; 27-09-2018 at 19:14.
spurious is offline  
27-09-2018, 19:22   #53
spurious
Category Moderator
 
spurious's Avatar
I loved Peig, but I had a great Irish teacher, who we all loved. She had quite a dry sense of humour, which only a few of us appreciated, but she brought Peig to life with photos of the landscape and islands, along with tales of the 'real' Peig stories, many of which were apparently quite blue, but in the days of McQuaid were not going to be allowed sully young minds.
Scothscéalta too and I think we may have been the only school to do a bizarre play set in the Plantations called 'Gunna Cam agus Slabhra Óir'.
Happy days.
spurious is offline  
19-02-2019, 23:09   #54
Garlinge
Registered User
 
Garlinge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 201
I still have Eisert (spelling?) in oldstyle Irish script. We were the last year that were allowed write our exams in old celtic writing....much more attractive and none the silly 'h's....
Garlinge is offline  
(2) thanks from:
Advertisement
20-02-2019, 11:30   #55
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 6,981
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garlinge View Post
I still have Eisert (spelling?) in oldstyle Irish script. We were the last year that were allowed write our exams in old celtic writing....much more attractive and none the silly 'h's....

I agree entirely. The old script was beautiful. I was useless at Irish but written and spoken properly it is beautiful, unlike the Irish today which is such a makey-uppy language. They've changed some original words and spelling.
Jellybaby1 is offline  
(2) thanks from:
28-02-2019, 01:17   #56
Up Donegal
Registered User
 
Up Donegal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 773
Irish School Books

I remember these Irish books from my secondary school days.

Is é Dia an fear is fearr. (1978/79)
Toraíocht Diarmuid agus Gráinne. (1980/81)
Cith is Dealáin. (1982/83)
Caisleáin Óir.(1982/83)
Up Donegal is offline  
28-02-2019, 08:54   #57
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 28,224
I must admit that, having finished secondary school in 1962, I don't remember the name of a single school book.
Malachi Unkempt Watchtower is offline  
Thanks from:
28-02-2019, 11:42   #58
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 6,981
And I embarrassingly admit never having gone to secondary so my Irish was in primary school in the 50's!! You heard right.....the 50's!!! The year I left they were beginning to change gluaisteán to carr!!! Why? How ridiculous to change an Irish word when it already has a word! I understand new words need inventing if there was no word already in use, i.e. ancient irish people never heard of the word 'supersonic' so a word would have to be invented for it, but who would be the privileged person with that job, inventing new Irish words? Bound to be others who would disagree surely?
Jellybaby1 is offline  
28-02-2019, 11:48   #59
blade1
Registered User
 
blade1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 8,295
I still have these for some reason

blade1 is offline  
28-02-2019, 13:38   #60
Up Donegal
Registered User
 
Up Donegal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 773
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jellybaby1 View Post
I agree entirely. The old script was beautiful. I was useless at Irish but written and spoken properly it is beautiful, unlike the Irish today which is such a makey-uppy language. They've changed some original words and spelling.
Cinnte!
Up Donegal is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet