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06-10-2013, 22:54   #31
Scrag
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M'asal beag dubh by Paidin Mhearach and Sceal Sheanagh?
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08-10-2013, 20:20   #32
 
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That Soundings book looks like its in mint condition. Was it really on the curriculum since 1969? I recall it from the late `70s.

And is that actually a first edition of the book?
Yes, First edition in as new condition
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17-10-2013, 12:46   #33
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80s and 90s books here.

Listen, Sing and Play (primary School music).
Treasury of English (primary school, picture of pirate on the front)
Figure it Out (rotten maths book)

And a geography book by a man called Tim McGillicuddy who taught in Scarriff, and there was a whole chapter on the local chipboard factory in it!

Scothscéalta by Padraig O'Conaire for Irish in secondary school.

Deirdre Madden's All About Home Economics (It's recently been reissued but I have the original one I used amongst my cookbooks!)

We also used Exploring English up to JC and Soundings for the LC. Still have them.

Thankfully I avoided Peig because I was doing Ordinary Level Irish post-1993 when it was only inflicted on Honours students.

Last edited by Aglomerado; 17-10-2013 at 13:04.
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24-10-2013, 20:57   #34
 
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The first confession, Frank O'Connor from Exploring English- ah, the memories
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27-10-2013, 22:33   #35
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All in The Cooking
Soundings
Jímín
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29-10-2013, 22:35   #36
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Ireland since the famine F S Lyons a history book I really liked and which made me interested in history this would have been the late 1970s.
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31-10-2013, 09:59   #37
looksee
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Brensbenz I have moved most of your post to a new thread (English as she is spoke) as I think it will make a discussion all of its own :-)
In reply to this thread you posted:


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The first confession, Frank O'Connor from Exploring English- ah, the memories
Yes, a classic! IHS = I Have Suffered.
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31-10-2013, 10:11   #38
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I've never figured out how those ingenious / barbaric Romans managed to calculate how many tiles they would need to cover a floor measuring, say, XXIV sandals by XIII sandals.
312???

loved Latin as well!!
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31-10-2013, 11:06   #39
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312???

loved Latin as well!!
Let me pull on my black maxi dress and send you to the back of the class.
The floor may be CCCXII (312) square sandals but, since we weren't given the dimensions of the tiles, we can't proceed. Best take the carrus to B et Q and see what size tegulas are available. Bring your toga maxima because it's a little chilly today.
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31-10-2013, 21:00   #40
 
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312???

loved Latin as well!!

mensa mensae
mensa mensae
mensam mensas
mensae mensarum
mensae mensis
mensa mensis
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16-11-2013, 21:04   #41
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school books you remember

sambo and the barn door.
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25-11-2013, 12:11   #42
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mensa mensae
mensa mensae
mensam mensas
mensae mensarum
mensae mensis
mensa mensis

Reminded me of this:

Centurion: What is this then? Romanes eunt domus, "People called Romanes they go the house"?
Brian: It..it says, "Romans, go home"!
Centurion: No, it doesn't! What's Latin for "Roman"? [grabs Brian's ear] Come on, come on!
Brian: Romanus!
Centurion: Goes like?
Brian: Annus!
Centurion: Vocative plural of annus is...?
Brian: Anni?
Centurion: [writes] Romani. And eunt? What is eunt?
Brian: "Go"! Let-
Centurion: Conjugate the verb "to go".
Brian: Ire; eo, is, it, imus, itis, eunt!
Centurion: So eunt is...?
Brian: Third person plural, present indicative. "They go!"
Centurion: But "Romans, go home" is an order, so you must use the...?
Brian: The... imperative!
Centurion: Which is...?
Brian: I!
Centurion: [twisting Brian's ear] How many Romans?
Brian: [yelling] I.. Plural, plural! Ite, ite!
Centurion: [writing] Ite. Domus? Nominative? But "go home", it is motion towards, isn't it, boy?
Brian: Dative, sir!
[The centurion promptly draws his swords and presses it against Brian's throat. Brian yells:]
No, not dative! Not the dative, sir! No! The... accusative, accusative! Domum, sir, ad domum!
Centurion: Except that domus takes the...?
Brian: The locative, sir!
Centurion: Which is?
Brian: Domum!
Centurion: [writing] Domum... -um [sheathing his sword] Understand? Now, write it out a hundred times!
Brian: Yes, sir, thank you, sir! Hail Caesar!
Centurion: Hail Caesar. If it's not done by sunrise, I'll cut your balls off!
Brian: Oh, thank you, sir. Thank you, sir. Hail Caesar and everything, sir!

Sorry. Couldn't resist.
I hated Peig. Would have much preferred to do Latin instead.
And Soundings. I can't believe it was from 1969. Does it still have Paradise Lost in it?
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02-12-2013, 01:34   #43
bonzodog2
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I went to school in the UK, in the 60s-70s, and remember exercise books ("copies") that had on the back cover all sorts of info about how many feet were in a mile, stuff about acres, rods,poles,perches,furlongs, chains, and other things kids today won't have heard of.
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02-12-2013, 10:54   #44
looksee
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Do you remember the Irish exercise books / copies that were used in the 70's and 80's that had the wildly inaccurate map of Europe on the back!
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02-12-2013, 14:24   #45
 
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bonzodog2, I remember 'exercise' books. On my way home from school my pals from another school would ask me to play but I would say, 'I can't, I have to go home and do my ekker!'. Aaaah, English as it was taught!

Looksee, what made the map inaccurate? My schooldays were in the 50's and 60's and I can't remember that.
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