Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
20-08-2013, 19:24   #1
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 27
School books you remember

Just wondering if any of ye have nostalgic memories of your schoolbooks? Apologies if there has been a thread on this topic already but I've been thinking a lot lately about the poems we had for Inter cert in 1966. Unfortunately- in a moment of stupidity/ insanity- myself and pals burned our text books when the exams were over. My mother was horrified - she said I would regret it one day and how right she was. What wouldn't I give now to hold that little book again - it was published by Fallons and contained only the poetry on the course for that year, - unlike later years when the poems were in a much bigger book, out of which you picked out and studied the ones on the course. Likewise with the prose book that year, - I remember there was an essay about the Pass of Thermopylae among others. My books had so many little notes and dates and fellas' names with hearts drawn around them - all gone up in flames.

Last edited by Molly007; 20-08-2013 at 19:26.
Molly007 is offline  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
20-08-2013, 22:01   #2
cml387
Registered User
 
cml387's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,062
It was a stroke of genius to re release the Exploring English series. I realise this is after your time OP.

I would love to have the old geography book from primary school, with the principal towns of Ireland and their industries.
I remember that the Westmeath entry had "distilling" down as an industry for Kilbeggan, although by that time (the late sixties) the distillery was long gone.


My primary English book had an article about the overhead railway in Wuppertal, I was interested to see it's still in existence.
cml387 is offline  
(3) thanks from:
22-08-2013, 00:58   #3
Rubecula
Moderator
 
Rubecula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 8,390
Hmm my post vanished???

Anyway I was saying I remembered a book I borrowed from the school library about 1960 called Kemlo and the Space Lanes Not seen it since, a sci fi novel and the first I ever read.

I still have a book called Kemlo and the Gravity Rays (about the same age)
Rubecula is offline  
22-08-2013, 09:11   #4
OldGoat
Registered User
 
OldGoat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 11,921
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubecula View Post
Hmm my post vanished???
Nothing in the Moderation log about it so it's not my fault.
Yay!
OldGoat is offline  
Thanks from:
22-08-2013, 10:00   #5
inthehat
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubecula View Post
Hmm my post vanished???
:)Vanished in the mists of time Rubecula!
inthehat is offline  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
22-08-2013, 11:49   #6
Rubecula
Moderator
 
Rubecula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 8,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldGoat View Post
Nothing in the Moderation log about it so it's not my fault.
Yay!

You snaffled it didn't you. come on admit it you are using my posts to line the bottom of the Goat cage.

(Welcome home OG hope you had a great time)
Rubecula is offline  
Thanks from:
22-08-2013, 19:34   #7
muffler
Moderator
 
muffler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 37,019
I recall more about a certain incident surrounding the first book I read at secondary school than the actual book itself. The book was a collection of short stories as part of the English literature class and the teacher would walk up and down the classroom reading aloud a story from the book.

Now the idea was that we were all to read silently along with him and when he finished it would be a quick round of Q & A's to make sure everyone was paying attention. Like any class of 13 year olds (or any age group for that matter) there was quite a variety of characters and we had one real dopey lad who just seemed to understand nothing and spent most of his time daydreaming. In contrast we had the class joker who was a laugh a minute.

This particular day the teacher was reading a story about a young lad going fishing at the river and how he got his rod, hooks, dug worms and put them in a tin, put on his wellies and got his rod etc etc etc and ended with him catching a trout. When the teacher finished reading he shouted "what did the young lad use as bait to catch the trout" and looking around the class he shouted "Mr Dopey" (Im just referring to him as that so as not to post his real name)

Mr Dopey upon hearing his name being called out managed to awake from his daydream but hadnt a clue as to what question was asked. Unfortunately he was sitting at a desk directly in front of the class joker who stretched out a leg under the desk, kicked him in the ankles, leaned forward and whispered to him..."a cow, that's the answer, a cow"

So Mr Dopey puts his hand in the air and says "please sir, it was a cow"

Needless to say the place erupted
muffler is offline  
11-09-2013, 14:37   #8
jos28
Registered User
 
jos28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,430
This is one I remember and still use today(great classic recipes). For those who remember Dometic Science classes it includes chapters on repairing and altering clothing, how to clean absolutely everything in your home, first aid, personal hygiene and cooking for invalids. It was printed in 1964, long before political correctness.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20130910_222229.jpg (1.91 MB, 228 views)
jos28 is offline  
(2) thanks from:
11-09-2013, 15:17   #9
BrensBenz
Registered User
 
BrensBenz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,289
"Latin for Today". Yes, I know, dead language, etc., but between those stern, matt black covers were all of the answers that our male teacher-in-a-long-black-maxi-dress could throw at us. Shortly after I discovered that he built every Latin class around Latin for Today, I became best in Latin class because I could find the answers before he became violent.

I still admire Latin for its "Lego-like" simplicity, all but lost by "modern" European languages. However, I've never figured out how those ingenious / barbaric Romans managed to calculate how many tiles they would need to cover a floor measuring, say, XXIV sandals by XIII sandals.

Last edited by BrensBenz; 12-09-2013 at 10:07. Reason: Errata
BrensBenz is offline  
Advertisement
13-09-2013, 20:57   #10
CUCINA
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 576
I still have a book from my secondary school days, "Exploring English Prose". I re-discovered it last year and so decided to browse through it for a few minutes. An hour and a half later (!) and so many memories...
We had a teacher, Mr. Henfy, for whom we had more respect than any of the other teachers. I remember he used to say to us, "I'll Frazierise ya" if we didn't do our homework or whatever (this was around the time of the Frazier/Ali fight).
Anyway, getting back to the book, one of my favourite pieces was "Down With Pigeons" by Robert Benchley, very amusing. Another was "The Gettysburg Address" by some obscure person by the name of Abraham Lincoln.
Then there was "A Dissertation on Roast Pig" by Charles Lamb, and Stephen Leacock's talking about "a certain piece of work" by those industrious blokes, A, B, and C.
Anyone else remember this book?
CUCINA is offline  
15-09-2013, 00:38   #11
DeBurca
Registered User
 
DeBurca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 7,752
The only book that springs to mind was "New Vista in English" which was used in my first year after doing the primary
It seemed that the stories in it were so much more grown up at the time a vast change from the simpler stuff that we used to before then and when MISS read them it seemed sooooo much better as she strolled up and down between the lines of us youngfellas who were just beginning to appreciate the female form
DeBurca is offline  
(2) thanks from:
15-09-2013, 19:43   #12
cml387
Registered User
 
cml387's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,062
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrensBenz View Post
"Latin for Today".
Oh god. Latin For Today.

This classic
What is this that roareth thus?
Can it be a Motor Bus?
Yes, the smell and hideous hum
Indicat Motorem Bum!
Implet in the Corn and High
Terror me Motoris Bi:
Bo Motori clamitabo
Ne Motore caedar a Bo---
Dative be or Ablative
So thou only let us live:---
Whither shall thy victims flee?
Spare us, spare us, Motor Be!
Thus I sang; and still anigh
Came in hordes Motores Bi,
Et complebat omne forum
Copia Motorum Borum.
How shall wretches live like us
Cincti Bis Motoribus?
Domine, defende nos
Contra hos Motores Bos!
cml387 is offline  
Thanks from:
15-09-2013, 23:29   #13
grey_so_what
Registered User
 
grey_so_what's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 19,342
Quote:
Originally Posted by CUCINA View Post
I still have a book from my secondary school days, "Exploring English Prose". I re-discovered it last year and so decided to browse through it for a few minutes. An hour and a half later (!) and so many memories...
We had a teacher, Mr. Henfy, for whom we had more respect than any of the other teachers. I remember he used to say to us, "I'll Frazierise ya" if we didn't do our homework or whatever (this was around the time of the Frazier/Ali fight).
Anyway, getting back to the book, one of my favourite pieces was "Down With Pigeons" by Robert Benchley, very amusing. Another was "The Gettysburg Address" by some obscure person by the name of Abraham Lincoln.
Then there was "A Dissertation on Roast Pig" by Charles Lamb, and Stephen Leacock's talking about "a certain piece of work" by those industrious blokes, A, B, and C.
Anyone else remember this book?
I remember those books well, they were and still are a great read. Exploring English 1, 2 and 3......Poetry, Short Stories and Prose. (possibly not in that order)

My mother threw them out when I finished school but I found them in a car boot sale (25 odd years later!). It was lovely to see one of them reprinted.

I still remember the "Dissertation" by Lamb........and The Lady of Shallot....

I loved my English teacher, God Rest her......She read them as they were meant to be read - with wonderful aplomb and character.......
grey_so_what is offline  
(4) thanks from:
16-09-2013, 18:50   #14
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 27
Yea I remember the "dissertation" too- I think that was on the course for several years. It was a classic! And a poem which started "A naked house, a naked moor, A shivering pool before the door" and also "Morte d'Arthur". Lovely memories. But it was the books themselves with all the little diagrams and dates and initials and hearts that I wish I had now !
Molly007 is offline  
(2) thanks from:
16-09-2013, 22:04   #15
cml387
Registered User
 
cml387's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Molly007 View Post
Yea I remember the "dissertation" too- I think that was on the course for several years. It was a classic! And a poem which started "A naked house, a naked moor, A shivering pool before the door" and also "Morte d'Arthur". Lovely memories. But it was the books themselves with all the little diagrams and dates and initials and hearts that I wish I had now !
The House Beautiful, by Robert Louis Stephenson.

Most people (well,me) seem to remember the next bit better:

Yet shall your ragged moors receive
The incomparable pomp of eve

On the subject of schoolbooks there was a strange thing happened in our school on entering secondary.

Since French was a first year subject, we were told we had to buy a big red (expensive)hardback called "Ecouter et Parler". There was another French book to get as well.

Thing is,Ecouter et Parler was in French and Irish, the other book was French and English.

Significantly, the school had recently changed over from teaching through Irish to teaching in English.

We never,ever,used the Ecouter et Parler book.
cml387 is offline  
Thanks from:
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet