Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
05-10-2018, 19:56   #1
LoughNeagh2017
Registered User
 
LoughNeagh2017's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Ballymaguigan, Loughinsholin
Posts: 474
A question about land

If you can trace your ancestors to an area of land around the early 1800s how far back would you expect their family to have lived there?

Could it date back to the medical period or did a particular clan only live within a couple miles of the clans central crowning site?

Take the O'Neills or O'Briens, they ruled land miles and miles away from their central base but would the peasants of the clan (ancestors of us) have lived in these areas far away from the central base?
LoughNeagh2017 is offline  
Advertisement
08-10-2018, 02:11   #2
Peregrinus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 15,726
Depends on whether you're tracing through the male or female line.

In the pre-modern period, most men live and die close to where they were born. Many women do too, but many others migrate to other areas as a result of marriage - they marry an itinerant worker, for instance, and settle in his community, which may be a little distance away.

So, if you're tracing through the male line, you'll often find the family stable in one district for several generations.

Still, there are periodic upsets, whether throug war, dispossession, famine, etc, that see significant numbers of people moving of necessity. These come along ever few generations. So stability over many generations in the same location is the exception rather than the rule.

That's not to say that the people living in a particular townland in, say, 1800 wouldn't be descendants of people who lived in or near that townland in, say, 1500. They might very well be. But they would be a minority; most of the descendants of the people who lived in that townland in 1500 will be living in other places in 1800.
Peregrinus is offline  
(2) thanks from:
11-10-2018, 04:39   #3
riffmongous
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Out foreign
Posts: 8,532
If families did remain in the one area going back many hundreds of years, wouldn't there be recognisable inbreeding issues?
riffmongous is offline  
11-10-2018, 05:07   #4
Peregrinus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 15,726
Inbreeding issues would be more common that today, yes. Indeed, they were. That's why we have the phenomemon of the village idiot - a small rural community where you have little choice but to marry someone who is, in one way or another, your cousin, as your parents did before you and your children will after you does tend to accumulate genetic problems.

This was a constant low-level problem until the invention of the bicycle made it possible to court someone who lives anywhere with a radius of about 20 or 25 miles. That vastly increases the pool of potential spouses and, lo, your problem is fixed. Which is why we don't have village idiots any more.
Peregrinus is offline  
Thanks from:
11-10-2018, 05:09   #5
feargale
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 6,475
It's relevant to ask which part of Ireland. The Cromwellian transplantations played havoc with population stability.
feargale is offline  
Advertisement
09-11-2018, 02:25   #6
meathstevie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 4,276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrinus View Post
Inbreeding issues would be more common that today, yes. Indeed, they were. That's why we have the phenomemon of the village idiot - a small rural community where you have little choice but to marry someone who is, in one way or another, your cousin, as your parents did before you and your children will after you does tend to accumulate genetic problems.

This was a constant low-level problem until the invention of the bicycle made it possible to court someone who lives anywhere with a radius of about 20 or 25 miles. That vastly increases the pool of potential spouses and, lo, your problem is fixed. Which is why we don't have village idiots any more.
I reckon I could find you a few places where they never had bicycles...
meathstevie is offline  
Thanks from:
09-11-2018, 07:05   #7
Rows Grower
Registered User
 
Rows Grower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 1,054
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrinus View Post
Inbreeding issues would be more common that today, yes. Indeed, they were. That's why we have the phenomemon of the village idiot - a small rural community where you have little choice but to marry someone who is, in one way or another, your cousin, as your parents did before you and your children will after you does tend to accumulate genetic problems.

This was a constant low-level problem until the invention of the bicycle made it possible to court someone who lives anywhere with a radius of about 20 or 25 miles. That vastly increases the pool of potential spouses and, lo, your problem is fixed. Which is why we don't have village idiots any more.
How come the invention of the Hiace couldn't solve the problem?
Rows Grower is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet