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21-01-2011, 14:07   #16
 
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Is organic farming sustainable in Ireland?
If the Greens climate change bill passes

Them kiss goodbye to a large chunk of farming, organic or otherwise in Ireland.
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21-01-2011, 15:14   #17
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There is always space for one or two model farms like the Salatin model but your not exactly going to feed Ireland or have a sustainable organic industry. To have a successful organic farm you need one a lot of land for rotation purposes and a good mix of livestock and horticulture production.
Why not? Ok there's no vegetables produced but what about the:
40,000lbs of beef,
30,000lbs of pork,
25,000 dozen eggs,
20,000 broilers,
1000 Turkeys and 1000 Rabbits produced all on only 100 acres.
In a similar set up Castlemaine Farm, of Co.Roscommon have blended livestock and Arable systems successfully. It really depends on the quality of land. Grazed beef and Dairy are most popular and easy to do in Ireland given our climate so why not just intensify that grazing with more species?
Livestock and Horticulture systems as you mentioned above will work in the good vegetable land of north county Dublin,Wexford or around Cork City here vegetable production could be emphasized to counter the lack of production in other areas.
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21-01-2011, 15:41   #18
 
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Why not? Ok there's no vegetables produced but what about the:
40,000lbs of beef,
30,000lbs of pork,
25,000 dozen eggs,
20,000 broilers,
1000 Turkeys and 1000 Rabbits produced all on only 100 acres.
In a similar set up Castlemaine Farm, of Co.Roscommon have blended livestock and Arable systems successfully. It really depends on the quality of land. Grazed beef and Dairy are most popular and easy to do in Ireland given our climate so why not just intensify that grazing with more species?
Livestock and Horticulture systems as you mentioned above will work in the good vegetable land of north county Dublin,Wexford or around Cork City here vegetable production could be emphasized to counter the lack of production in other areas.

I live in North Co Dublin actually and I know a little about the horticulture side. If you have to ship in Organic FYM from the west of Ireland it doesnt really work. Much more sustainable if you have mixed farms as you can feed the waste veg to the animals and use the FYM to fertlise the fields or use as plant feed or hot beds or as an energy source. Also with conventional farming along side organic your going to have spray drift. Remember more organic products fail pesticide testing than conventional because organic have no acceptable MRL. So you need to have a sustanial block of land, this area is a patch work quilt of different land owners or turn the whole area organic.
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22-01-2011, 18:28   #19
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If the Greens climate change bill passes

Them kiss goodbye to a large chunk of farming, organic or otherwise in Ireland.
What nonsense. Where's the evidence for such a claim?
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23-01-2011, 13:05   #20
 
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The real question would be is inorganic farming sustainable?

How much more fertiliser, pesticides and antibiotics can we throw at the environment before we run into serious problems?
Interesting quote from the Green Party when you consider the rant about farmers using pesticides.

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Pesticides
It is now known that the most damage by pesticide and herbicide residues to waterways is done by councils and amateur gardeners spraying along the verges of paths and roadways, where the runoff goes directly down the drains. Certain pesticides and herbicides should no longer be available straight over the counter but should only be purchased with a licence from designated outlets, as in Germany.
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23-01-2011, 13:11   #21
 
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What nonsense. Where's the evidence for such a claim?
Anyone got a link to the climate change bill draft and not a ranting newspaper article?
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23-01-2011, 13:37   #22
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Anyone got a link to the climate change bill draft and not a ranting newspaper article?
http://www.environ.ie/en/Publication...d,25002,en.pdf

If you read it, you'll note the clear absence of sector-specific targets.

Last edited by Macha; 23-01-2011 at 15:12.
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23-01-2011, 20:36   #23
 
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http://www.environ.ie/en/Publication...d,25002,en.pdf

If you read it, you'll note the clear absence of sector-specific targets.
Then who pays for it
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23-01-2011, 20:53   #24
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Then who pays for it
Pays for what?
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24-01-2011, 01:26   #25
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If Trevor Sargent, the failed minister for carrotts, had his way the whole world would change to organic food production.
There would mass starvation and famines within a few years. Only the rich would be able to purchase food!
Of course the consequent collapse of the worlds population, would lead to less fossile fuel consumption, less pollution, less plastic bags, less of all the stuff the greens don't like.
Hey presto ............. one of the great desires of the greens would have been achieved. A greener, cleaner, world.
This organic food thing is a sinister plot coming form the bicycle clip brigade
Yeah - thank God for Monsanto and DDT

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24-01-2011, 01:35   #26
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The market for organics continues to increase worldwide on the back of among other things food scares like the one recently in Germany, problems with contaminated milk in China etc.. Unfortunately this country has failed to capitalise on this (Ireland is at the bottom of the EU league for land under organic production) due to hostilty from vested interests in big-agri business and the failure of state bodies like Teagasc to move with the times
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24-01-2011, 11:58   #27
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The market for organics continues to increase worldwide on the back of among other things food scares like the one recently in Germany, problems with contaminated milk in China etc.. Unfortunately this country has failed to capitalise on this (Ireland is at the bottom of the EU league for land under organic production) due to hostilty from vested interests in big-agri business and the failure of state bodies like Teagasc to move with the times
Ah, the oul "hostility from vested interests in big agribusiness". Organic farming is also an "agri business" and run by those with a "vested interest" in making it work. Both organic, and conventional, forms of agriculture are valuable and worthwhile, and to imply that we'd all be better off with only organic farming, seems to be avoiding some realities.
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24-01-2011, 13:02   #28
 
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Pays for what?
meeting the ~30% targets of course

our emissions wont cut themselves by 30% without someone somewhere paying for it

stop trying to make it out as if there is no cost
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24-01-2011, 13:22   #29
 
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The market for organics continues to increase worldwide on the back of among other things food scares like the one recently in Germany, problems with contaminated milk in China etc.. Unfortunately this country has failed to capitalise on this (Ireland is at the bottom of the EU league for land under organic production) due to hostilty from vested interests in big-agri business and the failure of state bodies like Teagasc to move with the times

I think you mean its not sustainable in our climate on any large scale. Of course the organic market will increase worldwide as certain areas of the world economy experience booms, As I explained before apart from the odd fruit and vegetable grower most of our organic sector is dairy/meat due to our climate. Italy, Spain and Greece sit on top of the organic production table because they have good sunny climates needed to produce crops all year round.

Who are these big vested interests in big agr business? I never actually hear any names mentioned.
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24-01-2011, 13:28   #30
 
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http://www.environ.ie/en/Publication...d,25002,en.pdf

If you read it, you'll note the clear absence of sector-specific targets.
Has any research been done to quantify what emmission levels each sector of industry produces in Ireland?
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