Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
26-07-2014, 11:55   #31
johnny_doyle
Registered User
 
johnny_doyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,021
the page barleyfield refers to is on the site run by Brendan Lee

http://www.irishmedals.org/connaught...rs-mutiny.html
johnny_doyle is offline  
Advertisement
26-07-2014, 12:23   #32
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 216
RTE archive recording from 1970 including interviews with some of those involved.
http://rg.to/file/147df7b191859cda81...rding.mp3.html

Last edited by Phil_Lives; 26-07-2014 at 12:58.
Phil_Lives is offline  
02-09-2014, 12:07   #33
Dagshai
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dazzler88 View Post
It was actually my Great Grandfather so unforunately,I only met him once when I was a child but I have two interviews he done on CD,in the interviews he didnt seem bitter at all,his way of looking at it was they done what anyone in their postion would have done and doesnt see why they should be punished for fighting for the good of their own people.

It always makes me smile when I think of the scene,of an Irish tri-colour blowing in the wind in the middle of a British war camp,thousands of miles from Irish soil.I think it has to be said we gave the British more hassel than any other nation and stories like the Indian Muntiny just prove how brave our ancestors were.
My great grandfather too was one of the mutineers, Patrick Willis of Mullingar. It appears that he never spoke much of it and died and youngish man. I would be interested to know if he was mentioned in the interviews that your great grandfather gave. Many thanks!
Dagshai is offline  
02-09-2014, 12:11   #34
Dazzler88
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagshai View Post
My great grandfather too was one of the mutineers, Patrick Willis of Mullingar. It appears that he never spoke much of it and died and youngish man. I would be interested to know if he was mentioned in the interviews that your great grandfather gave. Many thanks!
No sorry no mention of him in any of the interviews. My Great Grandfather talked about James Daly and Smyth who was killed but didn't really mention any others.
Dazzler88 is offline  
02-09-2014, 13:09   #35
Dagshai
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dazzler88 View Post
No sorry no mention of him in any of the interviews. My Great Grandfather talked about James Daly and Smyth who was killed but didn't really mention any others.
Thank you
Dagshai is offline  
Advertisement
04-09-2014, 00:51   #36
Snickers Man
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 4,670
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuac View Post

the interesting thing about the British time in India is why such a small amount of British troops, and their Indian Civil Service could control such a large subcontinent.
Same way any colonial power subdues a country it wants to govern: get the natives to do it. Divide and rule. There are usually plenty of existing differences, divisions and animosities in any country. Find out what they are and exacerbate them. Recruit heavily from one faction and use them to keep the other in line.

The British always did that very effectively. As indeed did the French. And the Germans.

Look how the Americans are running Iraq from afar: getting the Kurds to do it.
It's not going too well at the moment but you can see the intent.
Snickers Man is offline  
04-09-2014, 09:02   #37
tac foley
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 5,423
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny_doyle View Post
Daly was buried in a CWGC grave after execution and not as outlined in the article

http://www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_...sualty=1498907
The hypocrisy is breathtaking.

tac
tac foley is offline  
05-09-2014, 14:39   #38
ChicagoJoe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snickers Man View Post
Same way any colonial power subdues a country it wants to govern: get the natives to do it. Divide and rule. There are usually plenty of existing differences, divisions and animosities in any country. Find out what they are and exacerbate them. Recruit heavily from one faction and use them to keep the other in line.

The British always did that very effectively. As indeed did the French. And the Germans.

Look how the Americans are running Iraq from afar: getting the Kurds to do it.
It's not going too well at the moment but you can see the intent.
Hitler actually was a big admirer of the British empire and copied aspects of it with the divide and rule tatics, concentration camps and so on. One of his favourite movies was “The Lives of a Bengal Lancer “ which he never ceased to be amazed at how as you say, with a small army and administration the Brits could control all of India. Fact.


( don’t anyone bother with the Godwin’s Law )
ChicagoJoe is offline  
05-09-2014, 15:01   #39
tac foley
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 5,423
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoJoe View Post
concentration camps and so on.
I know that a lot of posters here have less than a good word to say about the British and their odd little ways, but making a comparison between 'a temporary accommodation camp that concentrated people and resources into one location', and the likes of Auschwitz, Buchenwald, Birkenau and so on, is a step too far.

The end result of the Second Anglo-Boer war was not the total genocide of the Dutch and Huguenot population of South Africa, no matter how you put it.

tac
tac foley is offline  
(3) thanks from:
Advertisement
05-10-2014, 00:09   #40
kabakuyu
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 464
Quote:
Originally Posted by tac foley View Post
The hypocrisy is breathtaking.

tac

Some of those who were shot at dawn were also interred in CWGC graves.
kabakuyu is offline  
06-10-2014, 13:48   #41
FTA69
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 8,987
It's worth mentioning that Daly was only 21 when he was executed, for such a young age he was a man of extraordinary bravery and resilience.
FTA69 is offline  
Thanks from:
21-10-2014, 10:47   #42
Dagshai
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by FTA69 View Post
It's worth mentioning that Daly was only 21 when he was executed, for such a young age he was a man of extraordinary bravery and resilience.
From reading witness statements and listening to the radio program posted previously, indeed he was and a personal hero to many but specifically, in my opinion, to Joseph Hawes.
Dagshai is offline  
Thanks from:
05-05-2015, 00:23   #43
Connell research
Registered User
 
Connell research's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5
My Great Uncle, Simon Connell was also a mutineer at Jullunder, he was serving under his brothers name James Connell as he was too young when he first joined the army and his mother got him out. I have found that the ex mutineers were treated pretty badly by the Free State, even though they had all the information, ex mutineers had to provide British army discharge papers etc to get a pension. I hope there is some memorial remembrance service with the descendants/relatives in 5 years time! I have read Joseph Hawes account of the mutiny and feel it is as good a record as you will get. I am trying to trace what happened to Gt Uncle Simon as the family know nothing and he seems to disappear after 1937.
Paul.
Connell research is offline  
Thanks from:
05-05-2015, 09:58   #44
Dagshai
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Connell research View Post
My Great Uncle, Simon Connell was also a mutineer at Jullunder, he was serving under his brothers name James Connell as he was too young when he first joined the army and his mother got him out. I have found that the ex mutineers were treated pretty badly by the Free State, even though they had all the information, ex mutineers had to provide British army discharge papers etc to get a pension. I hope there is some memorial remembrance service with the descendants/relatives in 5 years time! I have read Joseph Hawes account of the mutiny and feel it is as good a record as you will get. I am trying to trace what happened to Gt Uncle Simon as the family know nothing and he seems to disappear after 1937.
Paul.
I presume then that you have seen this...
Dagshai is offline  
05-05-2015, 10:00   #45
Dagshai
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Connell research View Post
My Great Uncle, Simon Connell was also a mutineer at Jullunder, he was serving under his brothers name James Connell as he was too young when he first joined the army and his mother got him out. I have found that the ex mutineers were treated pretty badly by the Free State, even though they had all the information, ex mutineers had to provide British army discharge papers etc to get a pension. I hope there is some memorial remembrance service with the descendants/relatives in 5 years time! I have read Joseph Hawes account of the mutiny and feel it is as good a record as you will get. I am trying to trace what happened to Gt Uncle Simon as the family know nothing and he seems to disappear after 1937.
Paul.
I presume then that you have seen the records in the military service pensions collection?
Dagshai is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet