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26-06-2018, 22:53   #1
M.T. Cranium
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What a year of weather !!

I was just thinking, from Ophelia's visit in mid-October of 2017 to the current heat wave, we have seen quite a year of weather in Ireland (and it's not even a year in total yet).

Perhaps I am forgetting a few other events, but certainly the cold spells in late February, the record snowfalls around 27 Feb to 1 Mar and now this heat wave threatening to set new records, all in one period of less than a year, rather unusual in total. I guess from Debbie (Sept 1961) to the winter of 1962-63 was not a lot longer interval but there was no notable heat wave anywhere in that time frame.

Would you consider any other events from August 2017 on to be worth including, since otherwise this year can collect more notoriety all the way to October 2018.

I think that windstorm where Knock had the 84 knot gust was rather unusual too, on 2 Jan if I remember right, then later in January came Frederike but that was more of a blast in eastern England and especially the Netherlands.
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26-06-2018, 22:59   #2
Harry Palmr
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Chaotic, unexpected and extreme weather spells are probably going to become the norm.

Soft days are so 20th century.
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26-06-2018, 23:01   #3
Artane2002
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It doesn't really count I guess but we had some very impressive fog here in Dublin around 10-11 January.

The northwesterlies during the winter were very good too. The number of frontal snowfall events during the winter was quite notable too, around 5 or 6 times I think?
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26-06-2018, 23:12   #4
JanuarySnowstor
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An extra ordinary year as you say.
Hurricanes, snow storms and now a serious drought and heatwave.
For a country that normally sports a benign weather type (never too hot or cold) it's been truly remarkable.

Bay of biscay severe storms this weekend would be the icing!
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26-06-2018, 23:13   #5
Artane2002
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I wonder if we'll see a notable tornado this year. I hope not because tornadoes scare me!!
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26-06-2018, 23:15   #6
Donegal Storm
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The past few months have certainly been fascinating, obviously there was the late and extreme winter but the way we essentially skipped Spring and went straight from winter to summer was also interesting, from no growth and snow on the ground to everything in full bloom within a few weeks. There's probably been more clear sunny days since late April than in the past 5 years combined and an almost total lack of wet days.

Now if only we could get a massive slow moving supercell to travel across the country when this spell ends it'd cap things off nicely In my 30 odd years living here I've yet to see a truly impressive thunderstorm
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26-06-2018, 23:16   #7
MidMan25
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Originally Posted by JanuarySnowstor View Post
An extra ordinary year as you say.
Hurricanes, snow storms and now a serious drought and heatwave.
For a country that normally sports a benign weather type (never too hot or cold) it's been truly remarkable.

Bay of biscay severe storms this weekend would be the icing!
Got those last month in East Cork \ Waterford. Certainly the most significant and sustained thunderstorms I can recall in my lifetime.
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26-06-2018, 23:19   #8
Oneiric 3
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Lightning storm earlier this month was the highlight for me this year. Hopefully just a taster of what is to come this summer.
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26-06-2018, 23:50   #9
sryanbruen
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Some things that come to my mind:

- Longest spell of 20c+ days for late May/early June on record at Shannon Airport since its records began
- Lowest March/Spring maximum temperatures on record (at least that we know of) for Ireland (UK also beat their lowest March/Spring maximum temperature on record)
- Record breaking SSW event with two very severe zonal wind reversions taking place nearly simultaneously (many years we barely get one at all or to this severity)
- Ex-hurricane Gert bringing thundery rain to the north on 22nd August 2017 including 77.2mm at Malin Head
- Very good May Day Bank Holiday Weekend and the warmest early May Bank Holiday Monday on record in the UK (not sure for Ireland) (you can't say that often!)
- Constant lightning flashes on the night of May 26th/27th
- Mt Dillon recording 25mm under an hour in a thunderstorm on June 8th with a 9 degree drop in temperature during the period
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27-06-2018, 00:02   #10
pauldry
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In Sligo

No Grass grew until May coz of cold
No grass has grown much since mid June
Notable storms especially all the ones that WERENT Ophelia or Emma
most recently Hector causing widespread power outages and downed trees
Long spell of days over 19c in late May and June
Only 2 wet days of over 15mm in the whole of May and nearly all of June
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27-06-2018, 02:12   #11
hatrickpatrick
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I wonder if we'll see a notable tornado this year. I hope not because tornadoes scare me!!
I've always been utterly fascinated by tornadoes (anyone else watch the Nature's Rage videos from Readers Digest as a kid? ) but they now scare me a lot less than they used to. Not because they're any less dangerous or powerful, but because science has come so far since the 1990s. In both that RD documentary and the film Twister, also made in the mid-90s, the point is repeatedly made that tornadoes were so deadly in part because the average tornado warning was in the region of 3-5 minutes for a given location. NOAA now cites 13 minutes as the average, which is close to the "holy grail" of a 15 minute warning which is cited in both the documentary and film from the 90s.

It also feels like they're now able to give much broader, "macro" tornado forecasts, less in the sense of "A tornado is going to hit Cabra in the next twenty minutes" and more so "A dangerous supercell is forming over the Northwest inner city, we advise evacuation as tornadoes are a major likelihood throughout the day". That seems to be the approach taken in Tornado Alley in the US these days - they differentiate between a "tornado watch" and a "tornado warning", which is definitely a newer development.
I imagine the smartphone era also makes it a lot harder to miss or fail to notice a tornado warning - I don't know this, but I'd be incredibly surprised if there wasn't some kind of local message service in those regions which allows the local government or met office to beam urgent alerts directly to peoples' phones.

In short, tornadoes are still an extremely dangerous force of nature, but the "turn up suddenly and entirely unannounced" nature of them has diminished somewhat with modern science.
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27-06-2018, 09:42   #12
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End of a long tough winter and an early and possibly a long fine summer. Even with a summer windstorm Hector.
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27-06-2018, 09:48   #13
seamus
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I really only pay attention to wind direction because it affects my cycle commute, but it seems to me that much of the extraordinary weather this year is being caused by easterlies. I've never seen a year with so many easterlies, so sustained. Usually it's a couple of days every 4 or 5 months.

Is this just a statistical blip, or could this signal a longer-term trend; some indefinite change in the N.Atlantic Drift?
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27-06-2018, 10:24   #14
Billcarson
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The icing on the cake would be if we could get a white Xmas 2018.
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27-06-2018, 14:49   #15
hatrickpatrick
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The icing on the cake would be if we could get a white Xmas 2018.
I vote we start ramping the minute this heatwave is over
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